Such a sad looking tree.

Such a sad looking tree.

Marrickville Council has given notice of their intention to remove a Small-leafed Peppermint (Eucalyptus nichollii) outside 17 Loftus Street Dulwich Hill.

Council gives the following reasons for removal -

  • “Tree is in decline.
  • Canopy severe dieback.
  • The tree in its present state poses an unacceptable level of risk to the public & property.”

I went to see the tree & it is almost dead.

Council say they will replace this tree with a Swamp Mahogany (Eucalyptus robusta) to be planted in the 2014–15 Street Tree Planting Program.

The deadline for submissions is Friday 1st August 2014.  I will not be putting in a submission.

Planting trees at Sydney Park on National Tree Day last Sunday.

Planting trees at Sydney Park on National Tree Day last Sunday.

Tree-planting volunteers in Western Australia are waiting for official confirmation of a new Guinness World Record after planting more than 100,000 tree seedlings in one hour.  How fantastic is that!

The current record holder is India with a record of 99,103 trees, which was set in 2012.

The event organized by the ‘Men of the Trees,’ who are well known for their tree planting, gathered more than 2,200 volunteers in Whiteman Park in Perth.  Twelve hundred participants were school children.

Confirmation from Guinness World Record should happen within the next two weeks.

See – http://ab.co/1l2PZKN

Marrickville gateway to the shopping strip. The trees along here are at least 2 years old.

Marrickville gateway to the shopping strip. The prunus street tree at the bottom of the image is one of a row along here & at least 2-years-old.  Two of the trees visible around the Town Hall on the left have been removed & the pencil pines are due to be removed.

Compare with Chatswood  town centre with 4 storey street trees.

Compare with Chatswood town centre with 4 storey street trees.

I love it when I receive emails pointing me to media articles that prove to me that my observations about Marrickville’s urban forest are correct. An article in yesterday’s Sunday Telegraph said -

“A survey of the city’s tree canopy shows Botany Bay has fewer trees than any other suburb, with just 12 per cent leaf cover.

Next comes nearby Randwick, with 14 per cent, and beachside Waverley is also near the bottom with only 17 per cent. Other suburbs under 20 per cent include Auburn, Marrickville, Holroyd and Strathfield.”

Suburbs blessed with a tree canopy of above 50% were Pittwater, Warringah & Ku-ring-gai. Suburbs with more than 30% canopy were Lane Cove, Hunters Hill & Ryde. Manly, North Sydney, Penrith, Liverpool & Burwood followed. These statistics were gathered by the University of Technology Sydney & compiled by the 202020 Vision.

The 202020 Vision is a national initiative that includes government, local councils, the private sector, individuals & academics. The initiative was launched in November 2013, well before Marrickville Council’s new Street Tree Master Plan was released.

The 202020 Vision has the wonderful aim to increase urban green space by 20% by 2020. They want more trees, gardens, green walls & green roofs, because these will improve the livability of our suburbs & cities, as well as the health & wellbeing of the community & wildlife.  The use of hard surfaces, increased development & a rising population is creating urban heat islands & poor air quality.

Of course the urban forest & public trees are a major part of this. I have heard some of the Marrickville Councillors saying on a number of occasions in Council Meetings that we have enough public trees & one even said that we may even have too many.  Another Councillor even wanted all the street trees removed from the historic Abergeldie Estate in Dulwich Hill.

I must say that I find it exciting to see a strong movement to increase the canopy of Sydney.  To me trees are a public health issue & the research backs me up on this.  Maybe one day Marrickville Council will publicize on their website & in newsletters such as ‘Marrickville Matters’ just how many trees they target to plant & how many they actually planted each year. That would be good.

I will post more about the 202020 Vision soon. To read the Sunday Telegraph’s article, see – http://bit.ly/1zixCtJ

Sydenham from the air. The expanse of green space is Sydenham Green where there trees are planted mostly around the perimeter and along pathways.

Sydenham from the air. The expanse of green space at the top of the photo is Sydenham Green, where there trees are planted mostly around the perimeter and along pathways.  Street trees are amost invisible.

 

View of some of the crowd who attended National Tree Day - taken from the lower pond.

View of some of the crowd who attended National Tree Day at Sydney Park – taken from the lower pond. The fence & the piles of soil is because of work happening to the lakes.

Two children finalise the planting of a 5-metre Gum tree. I bet they watch this tree as it grows with a sense of pride.

Two children finalise the planting of a 5-metre Gum tree. I bet they watch this tree as it grows with a sense of pride.

One group pf volunteers gets ready for the next stage of planting.

One group pf volunteers gets ready for the next stage of planting.

It was a beautiful sunny spring-like day & perfect to be out in a lovely park planting trees. We came in via the bottom car park & knew where to go because of the large crowds visible further up the hill.

The path was lined with large tags hung from trees. Each tag stated a tree fact garnered from the recent Planet Ark research, ‘Valuing Trees: What is Nature Worth?’ – see http://bit.ly/1yMGZm5

Just one of the many tags on trees

Just one of the many tags on trees

A few hundred people were at the top of the hill where Planet Ark & City of Sydney Council held National Tree Day this year & in 2013.  It was wonderful to see how well last year’s planting held up & how lovely the area looks now that the plants & trees have grown some.

There were lots of families, lots of children, loads of bicycles & quite a few happy dogs.  The line for the sausage/veggie pattie on a roll was impossibly long & only three Planet Ark National Tree Day promotional hats were left. Everyone who registered to plant was given a pair of gardening gloves, also with the National Tree Day logo. Some of us see these as collector’s items. I saw a few people wearing their national Tree Day t-shirt from last year.

There were ‘trees’ walking around for photo opportunities. Kudos to the men & women who were wearing the tree suits. For a winter’s day, the temperature was quite hot at around 23 degrees. I imagine it was boiling inside the suits.   Still, they looked terrific & the kids liked the walking talking trees a lot. So did I.

The gorgeous children’s television presenter ‘dirtgirl’ was there taking to the children about the benefits of trees & wildlife.  She also took groups of kids to plant trees with her.   I think this would have been ultra-exciting for the children & definitely something to talk about at school next week.

Cricket & soccer star Ellyse Perry, played a game of cricket with the community after the tree planting was finished.  Incredibly the last of five thousand trees & plants were being planted at 1pm, a full hour before the end of the event.

Planting

Planting

People came to plant & were taken in large groups to sections ready to be planted out. It was a very well organised event.  A City of Sydney Council worker gave each group a lesson on how to plant properly, explaining the process step-by-step. This in itself was a great opportunity for both children & adults to learn how to plant to minimize loss.

There were native animal displays & kids yoga with a heap of children displaying just how flexible they are. All the free plants for the community had found new owners. There were tents with free booklets about the urban forest, the green villages initiative, community gardening & how to improve & add to biodiversity.

There were also large posters with information about the works happening in Sydney Park, but I will write about this in another post.

Those who had finished planting gathered around the lounges, the café tables or on picnic blankets under the shade of a tree.

It really was a perfect day out. Well done to Planet Ark & City of Sydney Council.  It really does feel good to be able to plant trees in the park.  Planting trees is not something those living in the Inner West can do very often.  One thing that impresses us every time we visit Sydney Park is that the City of Sydney Council is always doing work to improve the park. It was not planted out & just left to survive – or not. There are no dead looking areas & there are trees everywhere.

I think Sydney Park is a very special place & feel very happy to have been given an opportunity to add to this beauty. May all the trees grow tall & strong.

Volunteers planting

Volunteers planting

A City of Sydney Council worker gives a step-by-step lesson on how to plant properly to ensure a greater chance of survival.

A City of Sydney Council worker gives a step-by-step lesson on how to plant properly to ensure a greater chance of survival.  Groups like this were happening in various locations.

dirtgirl talking to a group of children about biodiversity & the need for trees.

dirtgirl talking to a group of children about biodiversity & the need for trees. She was fun.

The only way I like synthetic turf to be used.

The only way I like synthetic turf to be used. 

Showing the wildlife

Showing the wildlife.

A walking talking tree

A walking talking tree – thumbs up.

Another local National Tree Day event happening this Sunday 27th July 2014 at Illoura Reseve Earlwood with the Wolli Creek Preservation Society.  I am a bit late posting with the RSVP by noon today, but I am sure they will be happy for as many participants as possible & there is a phone number to check.

Another local opportunity to plant trees.

Another local opportunity to plant trees.

Give-away plants in containers meant to go straight into the ground at last year's National Tree Day event at Sydney Park.

Give-away plants in containers meant to go straight into the ground at last year’s National Tree Day event at Sydney Park.

 

The City of Sydney Council & Planet Ark work is holding a National Tree Day at Sydney Park this Sunday 27th July 2014 from 10am – 2pm.  Meet at the southern end of Sydney Park.  

They plan for the community to plant between 4,000 & 5,000 trees. Hundreds of people attended this event last year, so I am confident the target will be reached.

Children’s television star ‘dirtgirl’ will be attending, as will cricket & soccer superstar, Ellyse Perry.  There will also be native animals, nature crafts, face painting & kids yoga. Children can also plant trees. There will be a plant giveaway & a sausage sizzle or vegie pattie for participants.

Last year’s event was fabulous. I think it is terrific that the community is given an opportunity to plant trees.  This kind of activity generates community pride & also fosters as respect for nature.  I can’t wait to see the trees in the ground & watch them grow.

High Cross Park - set to become the Randwick interchange.  The near-century old Cook pines are to be removed, along with all of the surrounding trees, except for three trees  nearest to the cenotaph.   Photo by Rickie-Lee McLaurin-Smith used with thanks.

High Cross Park – set to become the Randwick Interchange.  The near-century old Cook pines are to be removed.  All other trees are to be removed, except for three trees nearest to the cenotaph. Photo by Rickie-Lee McLaurin-Smith used with thanks.

Row of Fig trees along Alison Road in the Randwick Racecourse -flagged for removal for a stop.  Photo by Rickie-Lee McLaurin-Smith used with thanks.

Row of Fig trees along Alison Road in the Randwick Racecourse -flagged for removal for a stop. Photo by Rickie-Lee McLaurin-Smith used with thanks.

There are two community events happening on National Tree Day to try to save the hundreds of trees along the CBD & South East Light Rail.  I am posting about these events because they are close enough to Marrickville LGA & because many of us have grown up knowing these trees.

760 trees along the route are marked for removal.  In Randwick, 270 trees are to be removed. Many are significant & historic trees, which have been here for generations.  The community believes small changes in the route can be made to accommodate the tracks & retain the trees.

I have put the events in order of the time they commence. It would be easy to go to both events.

Event number 1: PUSH – People Unite Surry Hills

Sunday, 27 July 2014

9am to 12 noon

Ward Park Surry Hills.

“Our aim to educate the public on the hundreds of trees under threat of removal due to the construction of the CBD & South East Light Rail. We want to ensure the government do all that they can to minimise the number to be removed.  These trees provide visual & healthy amenity, add value to properties, & provide a connection to our rich natural & cultural heritage – not to mention the habitat they provide for our urban wildlife including native birds. There will be a plant giveaway, garden maintenance & educational activities.”

For more information see – http://treeday.planetark.org/site/10005750

_______________________________

Event number 2: Randwick Tree Walk

Sunday July 27th – 10am meeting at High Cross Park at 11am (see below)

“All are welcome to join this free community walk along the planned light rail route between Centennial Park (at the corner of Alison Rd & Anzac Parade) & High Cross Park, starting 10am to show support for the many trees set to be removed. If walking is not for you, meet us at High Cross Park at 11am. There will be some other fun & educational activities for all ages.

Randwick Tree Walk is an opportunity for the community & its friends to show that they value Randwick’s trees. These trees provide visual & health amenity, add value to properties, & provide a connection to our rich natural & cultural heritage – not to mention the habitat they provide that connects us to our urban wildlife, including native birds. Wear your best tree colours (whatever that may be for you!).”

For more information see – http://treeday.planetark.org/site/10005868

Fig trees in Wansey Road, also within Racecourse land. These trees were marked for removal in the initial stop plans, but the fate is uncertain in the latest plan.  .Photo by Rickie-Lee McLaurin-Smith used with thanks.

Fig trees in Wansey Road within Racecourse land. These trees were marked for removal in the initial plan, but the fate is uncertain in the latest plan.  Photo by Rickie-Lee McLaurin-Smith used with thanks.

Fig & Plane trees apparently 'to be saved' due to lobbying ny Randwick Council.  However this has not yet been committed to in writing.    Photo by Rickie-Lee McLaurin-Smith used with thanks.

Fig & Plane trees apparently ‘to be saved’ due to lobbying ny Randwick Council. However this has not yet been committed to in writing. Photo by Rickie-Lee McLaurin-Smith used with thanks.

 

 

 

This beautiful tree at the entrance of the Addison Road Centre in Marrickville was recently assessed as being aged 150-years plus.   It would be a good contender.

This beautiful tree at the entrance of the Addison Road Centre in Marrickville was recently assessed as being aged 150-years plus. It would be a good contender for inclusion in the National Register of Significant Trees.

Next Sunday 27th July is National Tree Day.   To commemorate this day, the National Trusts of Australia has, in a world first, put together a national register of 25,000 significant trees.  Information about these trees will be available on a new website & also available as an app.  This means that you can look for significant trees while you are out traveling the country.

You can also nominate any tree that you think is significant.  The tree/s you nominate will be assessed by the Significant Trees Committee for each state ot territoty to see if they are suitable for inclusion in the Register.

This is not just about celebrating trees, but also about their protection.  A registered significant tree has a greater chance of being protected from development. Not always, but any tree is safer being on a National Trust Register.

To get a national map like this is very special & I predict that it will be a popular download both for residents & visitors to Australia.

The National Trust of Victoria has an excellent free app that maps & provides information on more than 24,000 significant trees in Victoria. I have long enjoyed perusing this app because of the photographs & often detailed information about the trees.  You can download this app here – https://itunes.apple.com/au/app/trust-trees/id426819442?mt=8

You can download the National Register of Significant Trees app on & after National Tree Day here – http://trusttrees.org.au

I have received a number of emails about the Frampton Street car park in Marrickville from residents concerned at the heat it generates and the general ugliness.

The Frampton Street car park in Marrickville is a perfect generator of the urban heat island effect.

The City of Sydney Council is trialing light-coloured pavement in parts of Chippendale, including a 600-square-metre section of Myrtle Street that included the road surface.  The aim is to reduce the urban heat island effect as part of an overall aim to reduce carbon emissions by 70% & increasing the tree canopy by 50% by 2030.  How fantastic is this!  It is disappointing that Marrickville Council has not done similarly to state a target for increasing the tree canopy in their recent Street Tree Master Plan.

Albedo or white-coloured surfaces have been shown to be effective at reflecting heat.  The traditional red roofs of Australia actually absorb & trap heat making our houses hotter.  The current design trend for black roofs is a dreadful move, as the heat trapped in these houses radiates back at night, raising the temperature of whatever surrounds it. This could be the house next door.

We have black roads, often dark footpaths, dark paving, dark walls, dark roofs, few street trees & poor canopy cover & much of the ground covered in concrete or bitumen surfaces.  All these hard surfaces create a heat sink, which then releases heat at night when it is supposed to be cooler.

Cities & built up suburbs are up to 8 degrees warmer than rural areas.  A few degrees might not sound much to someone who likes summer temperatures, but the urban heat island effect does kill people.  Around 200 people die of heat every year in Melbourne. Their 2013 road toll was 242, so heat-related death is something to take seriously.

The City of Sydney Council has installed temperature & humidity meters in Chippendale & Redfern.  They have also installed a Pyranometer, which measures the strength of the sun.  They will be monitoring how shade trees & pavement-colour affect the temperature.

Any interested person can look at their data collection from these sites here -http://adms.ajenti.com.au/Dashboard/Global/28

New Canterbury Road Dulwich Hill - wide footpaths and no overhead power lines.

New Canterbury Road Dulwich Hill – wide footpaths and no overhead power lines.

Someone put effort in to adding beauty in this Newtown lane.

Someone put effort in to adding beauty in this Newtown lane.  The slope didn’t make it easy.

Close-up.  There is quite a bit to see.

Close-up. There is quite a bit to see.

A while ago I discovered this little garden in a Newtown lane.  I thought it quirky & beautiful.  It definitely added something good to the laneway.

Lanes are areas traditionally neglected, yet they offer loads of potential. As you can see, a bit of creativity, plus a few easily propagated & hardy plants can make an enormous difference.  Well done to whoever created this.  It put a smile on my face.

Hanging plant, a vine & a mirror reflecting the tagging opposite.

Hanging plant, a vine & a mirror reflecting the tagging opposite.

Another look.

Another look.

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