Lovely old Poplar to be removed.  Unfortunately it is leaning.

Lovely old Poplar to be removed. Unfortunately it is leaning.

Marrickville Council has given notice of their intention to remove a Lombardy Poplar (Populus nigra var. ‘Italica’) in Camperdown Park, Camperdown.

Council gives the following reasons for removal -

  • “Tree is leaning with major rootplate lifting and signs of wind throw.
  • Tree is in a state of decline with signs of internal decay.
  • Tree poses a risk to public safety.
  • Tree is causing damage to public infrastructure.”

Council says that the replacement tree species will be determined during the Camperdown Park upgrade.

I hope the replacement is another Poplar to keep the line of this species in this location.

The deadline for submissions is Tuesday 28th October 2014.   I will not be putting in a submission.

The lean is more obvious on the other side

The lean is more obvious on the other side

Close-up

Close-up

Showing the lower section of this tree.

Showing the lower section of this tree.

The street tree in Davis Street Dulwich Hill to be removed

The street tree in Davis Street Dulwich Hill to be removed

Marrickville Council has given notice of their intention to remove a Bottlebrush (Callistemon viminalis) outside 8 Davis Street Dulwich Hill.

Council gives the following reasons for removal -

  • “Tree has had a major branch failure leaving remaining stem unsound.
  • Tree is in a state of decline with extensive internal decay and damage from termites.
  • Tree poses a risk to public safety.”

Council says the replacement species “will be determined by Street Tree Master Plan 2014,” but not when they will plant the tree.

I looked up the Street Tree Master Plan & Davis Street is part of the Dulwich Hill West Precinct. Eucalyptus eximia & Acmena smithii var. minor are planned for this side of the street.

I will not be putting in a submission.

The deadline for submissions is Tuesday 28th October 2014.

The branch

The damage

The branch that came off

The branch that came off

Black Tea-Tree outside 21 William Street Marrickville

Black Tea-Tree outside 21 William Street Marrickville

Showing the split

Showing the split

Street side

Street side

Marrickville Council has given notice of their intention to remove the following trees in Marrickville.

Tree number 1:

One Black Tea-Tree (Melaleuca bracteata) outside 21 William Street Marrickville.

Council gives the following reasons for removal -

  • “Active split at junction of co-dominant stem.
  • The tree poses a risk to property and to the public.”.

Council say they will replace this tree during the 2015 planting season with the “species to be determined by Street Tree Master Plan.”

I looked up the Street Tree Master Plan & Williams Street is part of the Newington Precinct.  Trees planned for this street are Chinese Elm (Ulmus parvifolia ‘Tod’) opposite wires & Weeping Bottlebrush (Callistemon viminalis) under wires.   This tree is under powerlines, so it will be replaced with a Weeping Bottlebrush, a lovely tree that attracts lots of birds who feed on the flower nectar.

Tree Number 2:

One Bottlebrush (Callistemon viminalis) outside 13 Wharf Street Marrickville.

Council gives the following reasons for removal –

  • “Tree has significant mechanical damage.
  • Tree is in a state of decline.
  • Tree poses a risk to public safety.”

Council says the replacement species “will be determined by Street Tree Master Plan 2014,” but not when they will plant the tree.

I looked up the Street Tree Master Plan & Wharf Street is part of the Marrickville South Precinct. Weeping Bottlebrush (Callistemon viminalis) are planned for this street.

No wonder this tree is to be removed.  Pruning for powerlines has removed one side of the tree & at least two other main branches.

The deadline for submissions for both trees is Tuesday 28th October 2014.  I will not be putting in a submission for either tree.

Pruning for powerlines has left a lopsided tree. Pruning for powerlines has left a lopsided tree.   Pruning for powerlines has left a lopsided tree.

Pruning for powerlines has left a lopsided tree.  The red semi-circle indicated the tree to be removed.

Large branch removed

Large branch removed

More pruning indicated by the yellow lines

More pruning indicated by the yellow lines.  The top was also a large branch.

Gotcha!  White-faced Heron fishing in the saltwater wetland in Tempe Reserve.

Gotcha! White-faced Heron fishing in the saltwater wetland in Tempe Reserve.

The very first Australasian Bird Fair is happening this weekend at Newington Armory, Jamison Street, Sydney Olympic Park.

From the website –

“The Australasian Bird Fair seeks to connect birders & nature lovers from across the region with resources, information & inspiration from around the world. Our goal is to enhance human experiences with birds in the many ways we regularly encounter them. We aim to enrich the lives of people in an ever widening audience by awakening a deeper connection & love of nature along with an expanding conservation imperative.”

There is a lots happening. See the website for more information & to book tickets – http://www.birdfair.com.au

My propagated plants from when I did the workshop last May.  All, but one plant survived & I now have many more propagated plants in pots around the garden waiting to grow up.  You won't be disappointed if you do this workshop.

My propagated plants from when I did the workshop last May.  All, but one plant survived & I now have many more propagated plants in pots around the garden waiting to grow up.  You won’t be disappointed if you do this workshop.

Marrickville Council is holding a free half-day propagating workshop. A teacher from Ryde TAFE will deliver the workshop.

There are still vacancies for this Saturday 25th October 2014.

I’ve done this workshop & loved it. See – http://bit.ly/1k1Qvvq   I learnt a lot & gained confidence in propagating native plants.

If you have a particular native that is doing well in your garden, this workshop will help you learn how to propagate clones for your garden, verge and/or to share with friends & neighbours.   Propagating also helps save lots of money.

DATE: Saturday 25th October 2014

TIME: 1.30pm – 5.30pm

WHERE: Marrickville Community Nursery, Addison Road Centre, Addison Road Marrickville.

Afternoon tea supplied, plus course notes.

BOOK: by calling Council 9335 2222 during business hours.

Huge loss to this park

Huge loss to this park

I was told to visit Tillman Park as the lovely Fig tree next to the railway line had been chopped down.  The first connection I had in the park was with a man who was very angry that this tree had been removed.  He told me that the tree had been chopped down in the last couple of days.  The stump, about 1-metre round, was still wet.

I have no idea why this tree was removed. If there has been a Notification of Removal on Marrickville Council’s website, I missed it.

I hope Marrickville Council elects to replace it with another Fig tree. There are fewer and fewer of these trees in the municipality.

There is room for this species in Tillman Park.  Marrickville Council has designated Tillman Park a ‘priority biodiversity area.’  Fig trees are entirely appropriate as they are a great resource of food for wildlife.   Fig trees are also impressive & we need to still have such trees in our parks.

The tree that has been removed had a canopy spread of around 15-metres. Before Council pruned it a couple of years ago, the boughs looked like an upturned bowl making it a lovely, relatively private refuge to sit & enjoy the cool shade & the birds.  I shall miss this tree & I know that others in the community already are.  Right now the space looks like an empty scar.

This whole area of dirt & rocks was covered by the canopy of this Fig tree

This whole area of dirt & rocks was covered by the canopy of this Fig tree & there is more area behind the camera.

The stump

The stump

 

 

 

Click to enlarge.

Click to enlarge.

The shows two entrances into two separate hollows.  It looks very natural.

The shows the entrance into the hollow. It looks very natural & would be very attractive for a bird to explore. 

This photo shows the back of two man-made hollows  shows how hard they are to spot from the ground.

The back of two man-made hollows that shows how hard they are to spot from the ground.

The following photos are examples of how Marrickville Council creates a habitat tree, which is a tree that would normally be removed because it presents a risk to the public or infrastructure.  Instead it is modified to remain useful to wildlife.

These were on display in Council’s kiosk at the Marrickville Festival last Sunday.  I did not go to the festival, but was fortunate to be shown these exhibits last week.

I found it extremely interesting to be able to look at these hollows & to see close-up just how small the entrance are. It’s one thing to see a photo or read a description & something else entirely to be able to see & touch a real one.

I think it was a great idea for Marrickville Council to create such an exhibit & feel happy that so many in our community got to see & touch these exhibits as I did.

You can read about habitat trees here – http://bit.ly/1034evv

Inside a man-made microbbat hollow - nice & roomy

Inside a man-made hollow – nice & roomy. 

Holding the back panel to the above nesting hollow

Holding the back panel to the above nesting hollow

Demonstrating the small entrance for microbats.

Demonstrating the small entrance for microbats.

 

 

Ultra-cute 'Lemon,' a brushtail possum in WIRES care.  Photo by Maree Evans with thanks :-)

Ultra-cute ‘Lemon,’ an orphaned brushtail possum who was in WIRES care. Photo by Maree Evans used with thanks 

Last week I was fortunate to witness an Inner West WIRES release of a young possum to the urban wild.   It was a fascinating experience.

The female possum named ‘Twistie’ is now 12-months-old & was brought into care as an orphan some 9-months ago. After being fed a diet of milk that moved onto fruit & then onto native flora, she was ready to be returned to the area where she was found & given a good start to life outside of care.

The tree was climbed by a man who obviously knew what he was doing, as he used ropes, pulleys & wore safety gear. He scaled the tree & found a suitable place to attach the possum box, which will be Twistie’s home for as long as she wants it.  Possums like natural tree hollows, but these are rare in the Inner West.

Possum in a nesting box fashioned out of a hollow tree.  A spy cam took this image.  Photo by Steven Richards used with thanks.

Possum in a nesting box fashioned out of a hollow tree. A spy cam took this image.  Looks comfy, doesn’t she.  Photo by Steven Richards used with thanks.

The opening of the box was faced towards the east, so she sees the morning sun & is protected from southerly winds.  How nice is that!

A bucket of fruit will be brought daily for six weeks to help her adjust & ensure that she has enough until she learns to survive on her own. Checking how much of the fruit has been eaten provides information for the WIRES carer, who will come periodically for anything up to six months post-release.

It is unknown whether Twistie will stay in this tree or move into another that she prefers.  Inner West WIRES have had great success releasing rescued possums from care, so I don’t doubt Twistie will do well.

Possums are Australian native Australian animals & are protected by law.

Possums are an arboreal herbivorous marsupial & carry their young in a pouch until they are around 4-months old.  They are nocturnal & also great pollinators, as they feed on leaves, buds, flowers & fruits.  They enjoy exotic plants & love rose petals, herbs & some garden plants.

It is easy to protect what you want untouched, like fruit trees if you have a possum around.   You can net trees & plants, especially in the vegetable garden. Apparently possums don’t like certain smells or tastes, so using a range of the following on a regular basis will help save your plants –

  • Sprinkling Blood & Bone fertiliser around plants.
  • Spraying with commercially available possum deterrents.
  • Make your own spray of water mixed with lots crushed garlic and/or fish sauce.

Possums stay in an area of approximately 100-metres in any direction & they need to be returned to the area where they were rescued.

The idea that a possum can be removed from a roof cavity & relocated many kilometers away to start a new life is incorrect. They will die if relocated out of their area. Possums are very territorial.  They suffer extreme stress if taken to another location. It is highly likely that other possums will attack them & this will result in death. Possums will also cover great distances attempting to return to their territory, which places them at risk of attack by dogs & by being hit by motor vehicles.

If a possum is in your roof, call in an expert who will set up a one-way gate, which allows the possum to exit at night, but be unable to return to your roof cavity in the morning.  They should check to ensure that there are not young possums left in the roof & permanently block access.  They will also install a possum box offering a viable alternative to your roof.

Using a trap is not recommended.  If caught, the possum panics & will try to escape even though it is causing injury to itself.  This can cause ‘trap nose’ – a severe injury sustained while trying to escape.

Even if you take the possum out of the area, another possum will very quickly take its place, so the best thing to do is call in humane experts if one sets up home in your roof. Then install a possum box & enjoy the nocturnal wildlife in your garden – that is if you are lucky enough to see them.  We have at least one brushtail possum & one ringtail possum in our immediate neighbourhood. It is rare that anyone sees them, but there is some excitement when they are spotted.

Lastly, WIRES is run by volunteers & relies on donations.  They are currently running a Food Fund campaign to help pay for the cost of the thousands of native animals they rescue.  Spring & summer are busy months.

$10 will feed a joey for 2-weeks, feed a wombat for 1-week & feed a brushtail possum for 2-months.  Donations of $2 & over are tax deductable.  To donate & for more information see – http://www.wires.org.au

There is also a FREE WIRES Rescue App available to download for iphone, ipad, Android & tablets.  The app gives advice on what to do if you find sick, injured or orphaned wildlife & also allows you to report a native bird / animal / reptile / bat that needs rescuing. For more information see – http://bit.ly/TzDX49

'Twistie' being set up in her new home.

‘Twistie’ being set up in her new home.  The nesting box is being fixed into the fork of this tree.

Mother & baby possum. Photo by Adey May used with thanks

Mother & baby brushtail possum. Photo by Adey May used with thanks

Brushtail possum out during the day.  Photo by Kim Sutterby used with thanks.

Brushtail possum out during the day. Photo by Kim Sutterby used with thanks.

 

 

 

 

Red-rumped parrots at Tempe Reserve

Red-rumped parrots at Tempe Reserve

Marrickville Council is holding community consultation about the future of the parklands along the Cooks River. The parks are Mahoney Reserve, Steel Park, Warren Park, Richardson’s Lookout, Cooks River Foreshore Park, Mackey Park, Kendrick Park & Tempe Recreation Reserve.

DATES IN OCTOBER -

  • Sunday 19th October 2014 – Feedback about all the riverside parks at Council’s stall at the Marrickville Festival tomorrow.
  • Thursday 23rd October 2014 - Feedback about Mahoney Reserve.  Meet at the Debbie & Abbey Borgia Centre – 5.30pm-7.30pm.
  • Tuesday 28th October 2014 - Feedback about Steel Park.  Meet at the Debbie & Abbey Borgia Centre – 5.30pm-7.30pm.

DATES IN NOVEMBER -

  • Sunday 1st November 2014 – Feedback about Mahoney Reserve.  Meet in the park 8am-12 noon.
  • Wednesday 5th November 2014 – Feedback about Warren Park, Richardson’s Lookout & the Cooks River Foreshore Park.  Meet at the Debbie & Abbey Borgia Centre 5.30pm-7.30pm
  • Sunday 8th November 2014 – Feedback about Steel Park.  Meet in the park 8am-12 noon.
  • Thursday 13th November 2014 – Feedback about Mackey Park.  Meet at Herb Greedy Hall, Petersham Road Marrickville 5pm-7pm.
  • Saturday 15th November 2014 Feedback about Warren Park, Richardson’s Lookout & the Cooks River Foreshore Park.  Meet in Warren Park 8am-12 noon.
  • Wednesday 19th November 2014 – Feedback about Kendrick Park.  Meet at St Peter’s Town Hall, Unwins Bridge Road Sydenham 5pm-7pm.
  • Saturday 22nd November 2014 – Feedback about Mackey Park.  Meet in the park 8am-12 noon.
  • Saturday 29th November 2014 – Feedback about Kendrick Park.  Meet in the park 8am-12 noon.
Mahoney Reserve Marrickville

Mahoney Reserve Marrickville

Steel Park Marrickville

Steel Park Marrickville

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