The brand new Carrington Road cycleway in Marrickville South.

The brand new Carrington Road cycleway in Marrickville South.

Safety at last for cyclists.  Shame about the Fig tree massacre though.

Safety at last for cyclists. Shame about the Fig tree massacre though.  Half the canopy is gone.  These branches used to arch over the road.

I had the best & safest bike ride that I have ever experienced along Carrington Road in Marrickville South today. Previously using this road felt like I was risking my life, but as a main route, it meant a significant detour when I chose not to travel this way.   Trying to cycle along the footpath was not really an option, as it was very difficult due to the many parked cars.

After a long campaign & many Council Meetings, Marrickville Council has created a separated cycleway.  It is not yet totally finished, but it is open to cyclists & we are using it.  I passed five bike riders in the three minutes I was riding along the route.

I thank Council for this initiative. It has certainly increased safety for cyclists & I think it will prove to be very popular once people learn about it.

As I was cycling along Carrington Road I noticed that Council’s recent work to replant the lovely & distinctive verge garden in front of New Directions looked like it had been vandalized. The verge garden was made up of French lavender & rosemary – totally appropriate for a company specializing in the production of botanicals.

Council recently planted 55 lavender & rosemary plants to recreate the look. However, today, there are 31 holes where plants used to be & only 24 plants remain.  If they were stolen, it is really poor form. I wonder how Council can ever get ahead with streetscape improvements when this is the outcome.

Verge garden outside New Directions - with

Verge garden outside New Directions – with 31 holes where plants used to be.

A closer look. Such a shame.

Such a shame.

The following is a guest post by Hasmukh Chand, a local resident interested in environmental protection & conservation through science & policy research.

This post is part of his candidacy to be selected to attend the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change in Lima, Peru in December 2014.  See – http://unfccc.int/2860.php

I wish Hasmukh success. J

______________________________

 

Marrickville: leading the way in climate action

 

I have been living in Marrickville for over five years now and I have been noticing that Marrickville Council and the people of Marrickville are becoming increasingly progressive towards climate change and environmental issues. At first I thought that it was odd that all this good work that was going unnoticed. A close friend of mine who has lived in the area has made similar observations on a number of occasions. Perhaps, this is because the political and mainstream media cycles these days are dominated by conservative news when it comes to Australia’s position on climate change and the environment.

Harnessing the sun’s power has been long recognised as an important mechanism for reducing our current reliance on conventional fossil fuels which contribute to climate change. According to the Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA), Australia receives about ‘58 petajoules worth of sunlight each year, approximately 10,000 times Australia’s annual energy consumption’.

This was taken on Thursday afternoon (28.8.14). The sun provides energy that drives life on earth and it's free.

This was taken on Thursday afternoon (28.8.14). The sun provides energy that drives life on earth and it’s free.

Marrickville Council has recognised the importance of the sun. For example, part of Marrickville Council’s Community Strategic Plan includes ‘the uptake of energy efficiency and low carbon, renewable energy in homes, businesses, street, public spaces and Council facilities and operations’ forms a core part of the Council’s Community Strategic Plan. The Council Administration building in Petersham, for example, is sporting eighty new solar panels, which will collectively save nearly thirty tonnes of emissions per annum. Solar panels have also been installed on the Annette Kellerman Aquatic Centre, the Council Depot, Tillman and Deborah Learning Centres and the Chrissie Cotter Gallery.

In an effort to further reduce the impact on climate change, Marrickville Council is also actively encouraging its constituents to embrace the power of the sun. To achieve this goal, information such as Your Home: Guide to Environmentally Sustainable Homes as well as other fact sheets are available through the Council’s website. I think that the leadership shown by the Council has been one of the driving forces behind the uptake of solar power by residents in Marrickville Local Government Area.

In fact, the people of Marrickville should also be congratulated for embracing the Council’s vision and helping do its part in addressing greenhouse gas emissions. Anyone commuting by train (particularly between Marrickville and Sydenham train station) would have noticed an increase in the number of households with solar panels on their roofs.

photo-by-Hasmukh-Chand-2

Solar panels on roofs near my place. Good on these households.

Solar panels on roofs near my place. Good on these households.

The benefits of solar and other renewable energy systems go far beyond that of addressing climate change. Earlier this year, a research by Pew Charitable Trust and the Bloomberg New Energy Finance found that in 2013, $4.4 billion was invested in renewables in Australia alone. Nearly half of this came from household investment into solar technologies. In other words, investing in renewables means more jobs and innovation.

A second and perhaps over looked benefit has been highlighted by Marrickville Council’s Green Equity Paper (2009). The Council found that solar panels and other solar technologies not only reduced emissions, but also reduced the cost of electricity. This is particularly important for those from low income households. This is why I feel greatly heartened by the fact that Marrickville Council has added its voice to many other stakeholders such as climate change activists, conservationists, political parties and the renewable industry, asking the Federal Government not to alter the Renewable Energy Target (RET).

Under the RET, the Government set goals to generate 20% of national electricity from renewable sources such as solar, wind and hydro, by 2020. To meet this goal, the RET provided financial support to households and businesses through the sale of renewable energy certificates for those installing solar panels, solar water heaters and heat pumps. Unfortunately though, as I write this the Federal Government’s RET review panel has released their report. The panel is recommending that the Renewable Energy Target either be ‘scaled back or scrapped entirely’. If the Government adopts this, it would be a significant obstacle for renewable technologies uptake and emissions reductions.

Regardless of the outcome, while the higher levels of government drag their feet on acting on climate, I congratulate Marrickville Council and the people of Marrickville Local Government Area for doing their bit (whether small or big) towards making a positive difference. I personally find these acts encouraging, as the news on all things climate change and environment related continues to be bleak and depressing. I look forward to seeing more solar panels and other great initiatives taking root all over Marrickville.

By Hasmukh Chand

 

Showing the boundary of the proposed Victoria Road Precinct. Click to enlarge.

Showing the boundary of the proposed 18-hectare Victoria Road Precinct. Click to enlarge.

Call me naïve, but what much of what I learnt during the Council Meetings I observed came as a surprise. One of the most important insights was the incremental changes, brick by brick, & the Victoria Road Precinct is a great example.

The developers came to the May 2012 Council Meeting & said what they wanted to do with the 18-hectare site.  The Councillors voted as follows –

Clrs Olive (Greens), Phillips (Greens), Byrne (Greens), O’Sullivan (Labor) & Wright (Labor) against the proposal.  Mayor Hanna (Ind), Clrs Macri, (Ind), Iskandar (Labor), Tsardoulias (Labor), Thanos (Ind) for the proposal with the then Mayor Hanna (Ind) using his casting vote to pass the vote. See – http://bit.ly/1rF1roi

During the extensive consultation process for the Local Environment Plan (LEP), the community was shown things like height restrictions & floor-space ratio & together with Marrickville Council, agreed on a development plan for the future. I have been very surprised that the LEP has been changed a number of times post approval & is still being amended to allow for more rezoning, development & higher buildings.

Since the LEP was finalised, the total for new dwellings for Marrickville has increased from a government required 4,150 by 2031 to a Councillor increased amount of 12,000 whenever these dwellings can be built.   The debate in Council Meetings went something like, though don’t quote me – “I remember when Marrickville had 110,000 residents & it was busy on the main street. Marrickville can cope.”

Once the LEP was finalised development started & many in the community went into shock with the ugliness of some of the developments, the loss of heritage buildings & the application for 16-storey high-rise in a location where 8-storeys was the maximum in the LEP.

“But how can this be allowed?” was a very common response from the community & they had to start fighting Council to prevent this. Thankfully Railcorp saved the day & stopped the 16-storey development because it encroached on Railcorp land.

In response to community outrage over a high-rise development in Dulwich Hill, Mayor Haylen lobbied for an Architectural Excellence Panel & thankfully, this was established.  Problem is though, this panel cannot be employed to assess every development because of the costs to rate-payers & if the Councillors don’t vote to send the DA to the panel, it doesn’t get assessed.

Earlier this month I sat in a Marrickville Council Meeting & watched the Councillors vote to allow for one-bedroom apartments that were a whopping 40% BELOW the floor-space ratio requirements.  My question is how can this be allowed?

The “Victoria Road Precinct” development is on the agenda for next Tuesday’s Infrastructure, Planning & Environmental Services Committee meeting on 2nd September 2014 & for the first time I see mention of 14-storey buildings planned for this massive 18-hectare site.  This is vastly different from the 6-storey buildings shown in their proposed images of the site that was provided to the Councillors in the Council Meeting of May 2012.

One other point that I think is important is that the development of the Victoria Road Precinct will be razing most of the area to the ground.  Also in Tuesday’s Infrastructure, Planning & Environmental Services Committee meeting is the attempt to save the lovely Beynon & Hayward building in Livingstone Road Petersham to be demolished to extend a Council car park. The community does not want to lose this iconic building, judging by the numbers who signed the petition & the comments left on the local Facebook site. See – http://bit.ly/1skfXi2

Both the National Trust & the Australian Institute of Architects have criticized Marrickville Council over this move. Also an article in the Sydney Morning Herald about the proposed demolishion said –

“London or New York might salivate at the prospect of reviving an inner-city heritage landmark, but in Sydney it seems we’d still just as readily swap character for a car park.”

Back to the Victoria Road Precinct, a new modern glass, steel & concrete precinct is not at all in keeping with the character of Marrickville in my opinion.  Many of these buildings could be repaired & repurposed to make the area similar to those in London or New York. However, the plan is to make this area of Marrickville look like what is happening to Alexandria at the moment – a suburb of high-rise square blocks.

Demolishing all the buildings may be easier for the developers, but I personally think it will be a loss to the community & to Sydney itself.  The Meatpacking District in Manhattan was once regarded as a slum, but since it has been rejuvenated it is now a marvellous place to live & work. Part of the charm is that the buildings were retained & repurposed into housing & employment.

I am in total agreement with this recent article in the Sydney Morning Herald.  It is about the Beynon & Hayward building, but it could just as easily be about the proposed plans for the Victoria Road Precinct.

_________________________

Marrickville Council is under heavy fire from heritage experts, who fear “ill-informed” decision makers are repeating Sydney’s errors of last century in the race to redevelop increasingly valuable inner-city space.” See – http://bit.ly/1k8JINc

_________________________

Now I must state clearly that I am NOT against development & that I believe that we need more housing.

I just would like development to conform to the height restrictions & floor/space ratios in the LEP, not be substandard housing & also retain as much of the streetscape character of the area. It can be done well & beautifully. See my post on The Gantry in Camperdown http://bit.ly/1sR1PMg for an example of great housing that retains the façade, yet provides housing of a great standard of modern housing for the same or similar financial outlay as other recent housing developments in Marrickville & Dulwich Hill that are currently polarizing the community.

I would also like the so-called “affordable housing” to actually be affordable & for those that are rental “affordable housing” to be given to actual finacially poor people & not to people based on what job they have.

My greatest fear is that I will end up living in an area that has lost much of what motivated me to move here in the first place.  I fear that traffic, which is already becoming unmanageable, will be horrendous. I believe that, if this push for  concrete, glass & steel high-rise goes ahead, the community will be asking why were these developments allowed just like they do about many of the local monstrosities built in the 1970s.

We are in the hands of our Councillors. Let’s hope they do not destroy Marrickville for the profit of developers.

Planning diagram of the development proposal for the Victoria Road precinct back in May 2012 - nothing like the current 14-storeys proposed.

Planning diagram of the development proposal for the Victoria Road precinct back in May 2012 – I can’t see the 14-storeysas currently  proposed.

The planning diagrams for the  Victoria Road frontage of the Victoria Road precinct as part of the development proposal.  Again, nothing like the 14-storeys currently proposed.

The planning diagrams for the Victoria Road frontage of the Victoria Road precinct as part of the development proposal in May 2012. Again, nothing like the 14-storeys currently proposed.

Anti-litter sign at Cooks Park at Dolls Point.  These were at every entrance, in the car park & also on many sides of the toilet blocks & other buildings.  There was onky three pieces of litter in the park & this was at the end of a sunny day.

Anti-litter sign at Cooks Park at Dolls Point. These were at every entrance, in the car park & also on many sides of the toilet blocks & other buildings. The park was clean & so were the waterways.

At one of the pedestrain entrances.

At one of the pedestrain entrances.  I believe this educates & fosters pride for the environment.

I went to Cooks Park at Dolls Point last weekend & was impressed by many aspects of this section of the park. I say “this section” because Cooks Park travels for 8.5kms through seven suburbs from the Cooks River, along the length of the Botany Bay foreshore all the way to the Georges River.   The section at Dolls Point is near the Georges River end.

This sign was on three sides of the toilet block - visible, but unobtrusive.

This sign was on three sides of the toilet block – visible, but unobtrusive.

My friend took me specifically to see the massive sign at the entrance to the park that said – “LEAVE ONLY YOUR FOOTPRINTS.”   The sign said it was part of a “Litter abatement plan – an action plan to reduce littering in Cooks Park.”

These signs were at all pedestrian entrances, in the car park & at the entrances to public toilets.  To say I was impressed was an understatement.  Especially after a long walk through the park & only three pieces of litter were picked up.

Cooks Park is as busy as our parks along the Cooks River, but it is not suffering piles of barbeque coal & tons of litter flying or lying around.  There was no string or discarded fishing line either & a significant number of people were at the park while we were there.  I’d say Rockdale Council’s litter abatement plan is working.

Dead trees have been left in place for their beneficial impact on local ecology.

Dead trees have been left in place for their beneficial impact on local ecology.  I love that there is very few concrete paths in this park.

This is filled with magnificent  trees.  The Pines, Norfolk Island pines & Coral trees are all classified ‘culturally significant.’  Many of the trees are veterans & historic to the area.  No tree has grass growing right up to its trunk.

My friend said she loved Cooks Park because she needed to strain her neck to look up at the trees. It’s true. More than half of the trees are exceptionally tall.  Rockdale Council has also left dead trees in situ & there are large logs lying around to improve on biodiversity.

The park itself is a biodiversity hotspot & is full of birdlife, as well as marine life at the water’s edge. I watched a young eel swimming in only 10 cms of water & have seen velvet snails & sea slugs as well – all without going into the water. The Cunjevoi season is incredible to see & is visible from the pedestrian pathway.

I have always been impressed by the work Rockdale Council has done along the park & also the creeks that are part of the ‘Wetland Highway,’ – an important biodiversity corridor for the area. Even having a ‘Wetland Highway’ is a wonderful concept.

The stormwater canal, which I thought was a creek until I looked at a map, is fenced off & the banks have been left in a natural state.  Dead trees have been left in the water & it was easy to see the benefit these would bring to fish.

Juvenile Ibis taking a drink in the stormwater canal - a boon for wildlife.

Juvenile Ibis taking a drink in the stormwater canal – a boon for wildlife.

Something else I really liked was the mosaic landscapes on the walls of various buildings in the park.  These depicted the park & environs at sunrise, daytime & by moonlight.  I thought they were exceptionally beautiful & think these mosaics would foster pride in the park.  They also add rather than detract from the surrounding beauty.   There was no graffiti that I noticed & no trees sprayed with tags.

The toilet blocks along the length of Cooks Park are being clad in wooden strips that immediately give them an updated look, but also discourage graffiti & of course, make the buildings sit well in the natural environment.

There has also been extensive dune restoration work along a large section of the foreshore near the actual point.  The dunes have been sculpted, string netting has been laid & planting has started.  It looks great now & will be fantastic once all the plants have grown.  It will also be wonderful habitat for the wildlife.

Cooks Park has something for everyone.  It is well worth a visit, especially if you like trees, birds & nature.  There is so much happening here, that your focus is not only on the water.

Mosaic on one of the buildings in the park

Mosaic on one of the buildings in the park depicting sunrise.

Another mosaic, again showing the iconic trees in this park. This one depicts daytime.

Another mosaic, again showing the iconic trees in this park. This one depicts daytime.

This one depicts the moon over Botany Bay - again with the iconic trees.

This one depicts the moon over Botany Bay – again with the iconic trees.  

The very natural stormwater canal.  So nice to not see concrete!

The very natural stormwater canal. So nice to not see concrete!

Veteran Coral trees.

Veteran Coral trees.  Imagine these in flower.  Birds would be everywhere.

The shared pathway lined with Tuckeroos.  These are the shortest trees in the park.

The shared pathway lined with Tuckeroos. These are the shortest trees in the park.

Dune restoration work has started.

Dune restoration work has started.  

 

 

 

 

Juvenile Grey Butcher bird - the first one I have seen in Tempe Reserve.

Juvenile Grey Butcher bird – the first one I have seen in Tempe Reserve.

It happened two years ago, but I’ve just seen it.

“The City of Playford has commenced a program of retaining selected standing dead street trees for their habitat value – this video explains the process and details the first such tree to be created, on Judd Road in Elizabeth, in the northern suburbs of Adelaide, South Australia.”

The tree is a ancient Red gum & a street tree.  Interestingly, the Arborist carved the ends of the branches to create more natural aesthetics & also to provide homes for insects. Natural holes were used to create access holes to man-made hollows. This has been happening in Europe.

The video is almost 18-minutes long, but worth watching for the information it provides.  It is interesting watch the Arborist create the hollows with a chainsaw.

Playford Council also provided native plants to the resident to add to the local biodiversity close to the habitat tree.   It’s great to see such enthusiasm from all involved, including the resident who lives closest to the street tree.  It’s a wonderful video.

To watch see – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mPLWrmMjmnc

 

Long shot from the bridge looking towards Marrickville.

Long shot from the bridge looking towards Marrickville.

From the bank

From the bank. Look how full it is & all those perches for the waterbirds.

Looking towards the bridge with the naturalisation work in the background.

Looking towards the bridge with the naturalisation work in the background.

Big thanks to Canterbury Council who have installed a floating litter trap & boom in the river next to Boat Harbour at Hurlstone Park. The boom collects floating debris that comes downstream, including the bane of the river, plastic bottles. The trap is full already & has only been installed within the last week or two.

What I particularly like is that the boom itself has been left bare, so that the birds can perch on it & watch the river as is their natural behaviour. It is the exact opposite of the bird-deterring boom in the Alexandra Canal that is covered in spikes to prevent the birds landing on it.  I found that so pointlessly cruel, especially as there is nowhere on the Alexandra Canal for the waterbirds to perch. See – http://bit.ly/1rucdNQ

Boat Harbour has the fenced off bird sanctuary on the peninsula, the first wildlife sanctuary on the Cooks River & now, a great big floating litter trap with perches, as well as a 40-metre or so boom to sit on. I bet the waterbirds are ecstatic.

Full of this muck!

The trap is full of this muck!

The boom & trap will go a long way to help clean the river & will also be a magnet for waterbirds to spend time. I saw fish swimming near the entrance of the boom & bet the cormorants are already diving under it to source their dinner.

The Bird Sanctuary & boom is an excellent addition to the Cooks River & will encourage waterbirds to stay on the river. The more waterbirds there are, the more the river will be attractive to people.   Hopefully, seeing the birdlife will encourage people to treat the Cooks River & surrounds with respect.  I hope that other floating litter traps with booms will be installed elsewhere along the river.

Other fabulous news is that Sydney Water has started naturalization work along the riverbank outside Cup & Saucer Creek Wetland.  The works include removing the concrete from the riverbank, adding gradually sloped standstone banks so the birds & the turtles can exit the river.  Sydney Water will also be extensively re-vegetating the area.  The naturalization works extend from past the Cup & Saucer Creek Wetland all the way to the pedestrian bridge over the river at the Sugar Factory apartments – a massive area.

We have seen what Sydney Water can achieve with their naturalization work at Whiddons Reserve in Croydon Park (See – http://bit.ly/VNsuP4) & with the spectacular work creating the jewel that is the Cup & Saucer Creek Wetland. This new naturalization work will make this section of the Cooks River very beautiful & fantastic for the river ecology & wildlife. I will post more as work proceeds.

A long shot that covers most of the riverbank to be naturalised.

A long shot that covers most of the riverbank to be naturalised.

A close-up showing where the concrete riverbank has been removed.

A close-up showing where the concrete riverbank has been removed.

The entrance to Cup & Saucer Creek, which used to be an incredibly beautiful place until it was concreted to provide work in the Depression.    Soon beauty will be restored.

The entrance to Cup & Saucer Creek, which used to be an incredibly beautiful place until it was concreted to provide work in the Depression. Soon beauty will be restored.

 

First sight of the habitat trees from across the lower pond.

First sight of the habitat trees from across the lower pond.

A closer view

A closer view. Both are still very tall trees.

City of Sydney Council has recently created two ‘habitat trees’ in Sydney Park. Both trees are Eucalypts & are located close to the lower pond.   They are surrounded by other tall trees & so would make attractive homes for wildlife.

A significant difference from the ‘habitat tree’ created by Marrickville Council in McNeilly Park is that the branches have not been ring-barked – at least it had not been done when I saw these trees.  It appears that Sydney Council has created more holes in each tree than the one in McNeilly Park.

Showing the damage on one of the trees.

Showing the damage on one of the trees.

Like Marrickville Council, the City of Sydney Council is also using these trees as a demonstration for professionals on to how to create nesting hollows for birds & animals.

I really like this movement to retain trees that would have been removed previously.   The idea is to mimic dead trees found in the bush.

The more I read about dead trees the more I realize how important these old dead trees are to the ecology of the environment.   Standing dead trees in the bush are called snags & stag trees.

Only old trees have hollows & these trees often need to be 100-150 years old before they start creating hollows.  Eucalypts start creating hollows after dropping branches & we know that once branch-dropping starts, the tree is removed for the safety of the human population.

“Australia-wide, 15% of all land birds use hollows. These 114 species include parrots, owls cockatoos & lorikeets, ducks, treecreepers, owls, owlet-nightjar, kingfishers, pardolotes, martins & woodswallows.”  ~ Sourced from Wildlife Notes, Department of Conservation & Management April 2005.

One of the least known characteristics of Australian animals is their high utilisation of tree hollows. For example, the proportion of Australian animals that use tree hollows is three times greater than in North America & twice as great as in South Africa.

About 350 Australian animals use hollows for either roosting or nesting. This includes:


  • half of our small bats,
  • nearly 90% of our parrots,
  • all of our gliders,
  • all but one of our owls
  • all of our tree-creepers.

Nearly 20% of our birds use hollows in some way. For 60% of these, hollows are essential.” http://www.ozbox.net.au/anim&holl.htm

Of the 22 species of bats that have been recorded to utilise tree hollows in NSW, 10 of these are listed as threatened. (Gibbons & Lindenmayer 1997).

Repurposing trees that would have been removed so that they become useful for wildlife is a great idea. Tree hollows in urban environments are very rare.  I look at trees all the time, but only know of three trees on public land in Marrickville LGA that have natural hollows. I applaud this move to help wildlife & improve on biodiversity by both Councils.   It will be interesting to see what wildlife do take up residence in these hollows.

Sign on tree

Educational sign on tree

The back of the nesting hollows.  To show the front would have meant facing the sun,

The back of the nesting hollows. To show the front would have meant photographing into the sun.

Another view.  It's hard to see the hollows, but the more I looked, the more I spotted.  They are on the tips of branches as well as multiple hollows along branches.

Another view. It’s hard to see the hollows, but the more I looked, the more I spotted. They are on the tips of branches as well as multiple hollows along branches.

A hollow has been made at he end of many of the branches.

A hollow has been made at he end of many of the branches.  It’s hard to see, but it is there.

 

From this...

From this…

To this….

To this….

Leaving this...

Leaving this…

To this.

To this.

And finally to this.  I wonder why it was necessary in the first place.

And finally to this. I wonder why it was necessary in the first place.

On 10th April 2014 I posted about the ruination of a very nice & quite different street tree that was a feature the corner of Swain Street & Burrows Avenue Sydenham.  See – http://bit.ly/1hjsbUq   The tree was left unviable after pruning for power lines & was removed.

I was pleased to see that Marrickville Council planted a new tree in this location sometime in the last week.  It looks like a Banksia serrata, which is a great tree, especially for wildlife.

Fabulous idea to put a green wall here.

Fabulous idea to put a green wall here.

The geraniums are doing well.

The geraniums are doing well.

The residents at the corner of Ewart Street & Ewart Lane Dulwich Hill have recently created a green wall. The house is very visible when you drive along Ewart Street towards Marrickville, so a green wall here is a very nice addition to the streetscape.

The green wall structure is made of pockets in geo-textile that has been fixed to the exterior wall.   Each pocket is filled with soil or another growing medium & planted. It appears that they were having some problems with plants surviving in this hot location. However, the geraniums were doing very well & the vibrant red of their flowers is what initially attracted my eye.

My photos were taken around a month ago & it may have been replanted since then.   With trial & error they will find what works & the community will get to benefit from the addition of beauty on what was a bare wall.

The residents have also planted mother-in-law’s tongue in the tiny area between the wall of the house & the kerb of Ewart Lane. These are extremely hardy & are a good choice for this location. Being hemmed in by the building wall & the kerb with the bitumen road beside will stop them spreading.

I was with a friend who was just as happy as I was to see this work. Any addition of green improves the streetscape. Adding the structure on the wall was a great idea & I am sure that this will become very attractive as the plants grow. Well done.

Showing the planting along the side of the house that borders Ewart Lane.  I think this looks great.

Showing the planting along the side of the house that borders Ewart Lane. I think this looks great.

Marrickville Councillor Emanuel Tsardoulias.

Marrickville Councillor Emanuel Tsardoulias.  Photo from Marrickville Council & used with thanks.

Sad news. Last weekend Marrickville Councillor Emanuel Tsardoulias died after a long battle with cancer.  He was 38-years-old & is survived by his wife & two children.

Clr Tsardoulias was willing to devote his time to work for the community on many levels & this is something to be applauded.

He was elected as the Labor Councillor for West Ward (Burraga) & held that position since September 2008. This was his third term as a Councillor.

A Condolence Book will be available for anyone to sign at the Council meeting tomorrow night.  His death is a great loss to the whole community of Marrickville.

You can read Council’s Press Release here – http://bit.ly/1vZY7pw

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