Very large rain garden in  Alice Lane Newtown

A very large rain garden in Alice Lane Newtown. This new development also planted numerous trees.  

Just published research from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate System Science called, Future increases in extreme precipitation exceed observed scaling rates’ (http://go.nature.com/2iFybub) This research says we can expect “strong increases in rainfall during extreme precipitation events in Australia as a result of global warming.”

A 2°C rise in global average temperatures, is expected to cause an 11.3% to 30% intensification in rainfall from extreme precipitation events in Australia.  Other areas will be more susceptible to drought.

The researchers looked at the likely outcomes of a 4°C rise in global temperature & found “a projected increase in rainfall for extreme events of 22-60%.”  A 4°C rise in global temperature “is a likely outcome based on current increases in the rate of carbon emissions.”  See – http://bit.ly/2jlUfMs

More intense rainfall extremes will likely cause a problem with stormwater, so it is just not an issue of sea-level rise, but also more rain, which has to go somewhere.

Nature did not expect that our cities & suburbs would be covered in vast amounts of concrete & other impermeable surfaces like roofs & roads.  If rain water cannot seep into the ground, it will flow over the hard surfaces following the slope of the land until it reaches an area where it collects.  Many of our streets do this naturally & become hazardous areas during a heavy downpour.  Imagine what these will become during “intense rainfall extremes.”

In the Inner West, our sewerage / stormwater infrastructure is aging & “at capacity” – or so I once read in a Marrickville Council paper on the subject.  The level of new development, predominantly high-rise, will significantly add to this load, so I guess we need to expect more flooding.

Inner West Council (nee Marrickville Council) has done quite a bit of work building swales & raingardens around the Cooks River.   Once water is in the swale or raingarden, it can seep into the ground naturally.  This process cleans it of pollutants such as oil, grease, particulate matter, litter, heavy metals & fertilizers before the water reaches the river or replenishes groundwater stores.

Until I read about it I had never considered that litter tossed in the street at Newtown or Enmore could reach the Cooks River & I am sure most people don’t think about or know of this either.

Council has also been slowly creating verge gardens for a number of years.  These not only cool the streets & add beauty & pockets of habitat, they also help capture stormwater.

Things we can do to help with stormwater management –

  • Choose to have as much ground surface available on our property. This means not creating large expanses of concrete driveways or concreting our back & front gardens.  All water that runs off your property causes a problem somewhere else.
  • Depave any unnecessary concrete in your property. Every bit of depaving helps.
  • We can agree to a street tree out front if Council asks us & look after it if one is planted. Trees are very good at capturing the rain & holding it in the canopy. Rainwater either slowly drips to the ground or is absorbed into the atmosphere by the process of evapotranspiration.
  • Create & look after a verge garden.
  • Plant tree/s & add living plants to everywhere we can – ground, roofs & walls.

With all the development happening or about to start across Sydney, local councils & planning bodies would do well to insist that developers retain as many mature trees as possible on development sites.  Instead of installing underground pipes to take stormwater from the site to the collective sewerage system, it would be better if they did not over develop the site & planted more big canopy trees & other vegetation as these would help slow down some of the stormwater.  Adding a raingarden would be good too.

Our city is changing rapidly.  Climate change is happening & expected to worsen.  How well we live & our quality of life very much depends on how we create our environment.   We will be much better off if we depave, if we plant medium to large growth trees & if we add living plants to everywhere we can – ground, roofs & walls.  We need to start to plant to keep cool & to help manage stormwater.

I do not understand why new high-rise developments are allowed to build right to the front footpath.  Not only is this unsightly, but it also subjects residents of the building to all the health issues connected with particulate matter & other air pollutants from the passing traffic below.  It would be far nicer & healthier for everyone if a 2-5 metre space (depending on the size of the property) were left to plant shrubs, trees & other vegetation.

I do not understand why new high-rise developments are allowed to build right to the front footpath. Not only is this unsightly, but it also subjects residents of the building to all the terrible & significant health issues connected with particulate matter & other air pollutants from the passing traffic below. It would be far nicer & healthier for everyone if a 2-5 metre space (depending on the size of the property) were left between the front footpath & the building to plant shrubs, trees & other vegetation. 

Female Magpie & her new out of the nest fledgling drinking from the gutter.  Fresh water is not readily available for birds in this area that I am aware of so it would be wonderful if the community provided drinking water for them.

Female Magpie & her recently out of the nest fledgling drinking from the gutter.  Fresh water is not readily available for birds in this area that I am aware of so it would be wonderful if the community provided drinking water for them.

The heat is terrible at the moment & it stresses our wildlife.  Birds can die during heatwaves.

If you can put out water for the birds it would be helpful.   It doesn’t need to be a birdbath, any wide shallow container will do.

Place it somewhere safe & where the birds can sit & watch before they go for a drink, but also in a place where they can easily escape to safety.

If your container is deep, place a brick or pebbles inside so the birds can get out.  To make it useful to other creatures such as bees & lizards, place a suitable stick to allow entry into & exit from the water.

Placing the water in the shade is better because, like us, birds like cool water.

Lastly, it is best to replace the water every day to prevent the spread of any disease.

Cup and Saucer Creek Wetland three weeks ago with much of the pond area covered with netting.

Cup and Saucer Creek Wetland three weeks ago with much of the pond area covered with netting.

Cup and Saucer Creek Wetland last Sunday.  It's a jungle in there.

Cup and Saucer Creek Wetland last Sunday. It’s a jungle in there.

Something interesting is happening at Cup & Saucer Creek Wetland, but I don’t know what.  It is obvious that work is being done because the pond has been drained & large areas have been covered with netting.  It was like this three weeks ago & everything had grown into jungle-like proportions by last weekend.

Canterbury Council holds regular working bees in the wetland & are looking for new volunteers.  To register your interest & for more information about how you can get involved, call Council on 9707 9000.

The pond closest to the river is green with algae.

The pond closest to the river is green with algae.

Two branches left after pruning by Ausgrid

Two branches left after pruning by Ausgrid

I found a very interesting article on the practice of tree topping in American newspaper the Richmond Register called, ‘Topping Trees is a Bad Practice.’  See – http://bit.ly/2ifhA5e

It is especially interesting in terms of the topping of street trees done by power company Ausgrid, as mentioned in the City of Sydney Council Minute I posted here last week.

  • “Topping involves the drastic removal or cutting back of large branches in mature trees leaving stubs. Topping can make a tree hazardous and reduce its life.”
  • Removing much of the tree canopy upsets the crown-to-root ratio and can cause serious interruption of the tree’s food supply as well as exposing the bark to the sun. For example: a 20-year-old tree has developed 20-years-worth of leaf surface area, therefore that much area is needed to feed the 20-years-worth of branches, trunks and roots that have developed.”
  • “Large branch stubs left from topping seldom close or callus. Nutrients are no longer transported to large stubs and that part of the tree becomes unable to seal off the injury. This leaves stubs vulnerable to insect invasion and fungal decay. Once decay has begun in a branch stub, it may spread into the main trunk, ultimately killing the tree.”
  • “Topping removes all existing buds that would ordinarily produce normal sturdy branches and instead stimulates regrowth that is dense and upright just below the pruning cut. The growth that results from topping is not well integrated into the wood of the tree. Because of the weak connections, these branches are more vulnerable to breaking.”

We know there is another way because Energy Australia managed our street trees for many decades with a pruning cycle of 7-8 years, while now Ausgrid has a pruning cycle of every 18-months.

Food for thought.

This sign was installed  by Marrickville Council.

This sign was installed by Marrickville Council.

A resident said with some sarcasm that they were glad Ausgrid at least left some canopy over the street.  (Marrickville)

A resident said with some sarcasm that they were glad Ausgrid at least left some canopy over the street. (Marrickville)

Today I was sent this Minute of the City of Sydney Council dated 24th October 2016.  This council document makes wonderful reading for those of us who have been greatly concerned & angered by the pruning practices of our street trees by power company Ausgrid.   It also gives our opinions legitimacy.  I thank Clover Moore, Lord Mayor of the City of Sydney for this Minute.

Bold is my emphasis. For the original document see –  http://bit.ly/2iEjxEw

 COUNCIL

24 OCTOBER 2016

ITEM 3.2. FILE NO:

To Council:

AUSGRID TREE PRUNING S051491

MINUTE BY THE LORD MAYOR

The City’s urban canopy helps make our city liveable for our residents and workers. Street trees benefit the community’s health, remove pollutants from the air, create shade in the hot summer months and enhance general wellbeing. In densely populated areas, trees can also provide privacy.

There are currently around 81,000 trees in the City of Sydney area. Our last canopy measurement in 2013 found that the Local Government Area (LGA) has a 17.1 per cent canopy cover. This is up from just over 15 per cent in 2008.

Over the past 11 years, more than 11,431 street trees have been planted throughout the local area as part of our commitment in Sustainable Sydney 2030 to increase the local area’s green canopy by 50 per cent to 23.5 per cent in total.

Street trees need to be pruned occasionally to maintain the security of the overhead electricity wires. However, I share the concerns of residents about the disgraceful way in which Ausgrid’s contractors mutilate trees.

The methods breach the Australian Standard for the Pruning of Amenity Trees. Of particular concern is:

  • the ‘pruning’ is excessive and unnecessary and, far from being based on a risk management approach, it is simply “one size fits all”;
  • Ausgrid’s approach takes no account of tree species and growth rates, formative pruning that may have been carried out by local authorities, tree location, maintenance regime or risk of failure;
  • Ausgrid contractors effectively use ‘lopping’, the removal of branches to a designated clearance and not to a branch collar or other growth point. This is described as an ‘unacceptable practice’ in the Australian Standard for the Pruning of Amenity Trees; and
  • lopping is more expensive than a more environmentally sensitive approach would be. The harder a tree is cut the faster the regrowth. So the practice implemented by Ausgrid increases the cost of pruning as the trees require more frequent visits. The approach not only fails in terms of the environment and urban amenity, but economically.

Ausgrid’s mutilation of trees is controversial throughout the areas in which it occurs. On 12 October 2016, the Member for Summer Hill, Jo Haylen MP, moved a motion in the NSW Parliament calling on the Baird Government to hold an urgent parliamentary inquiry into “the butchering of trees across the inner west” by Ausgrid contractors. The motion followed a public meeting in Haberfield the previous month that was attended by over 100 people in response to Ausgrid pruning in that suburb.

When questioned about their approach, Ausgrid makes spurious claims to justify the extensive pruning, such as the risk of children climbing trees and getting electrocuted. I have seen no evidence to support this claim. On 13 October 2016, the Member for Sydney, Alex Greenwich MP, asked a number of questions in State parliament about Ausgrid’s pruning practices and the claims they have made to justify them. I look forward to the responses.

Lopping in the City’s LGA stopped in mid-2016 after representations from the City but continues in the inner west and north shore. We remain concerned that the Ausgrid pruning program for 2017 in the City may include destructive practices, such as lopping in the absence of a formal commitment not to.

Ultimately, the solution is to place power lines underground, something I have been calling for as Lord Mayor and as State MP since 2001. Underground power lines would remove the need to mutilate street trees and provide future generations with a permanent legacy of greater energy reliability, improved safety and a better urban environment. It will bring us into step with other Australian capitals, and major international cities such as London New York, Paris and Rome.

I will write to the Premier requesting that he begin this important work as soon as possible. I will also write to the President of Local Government NSW (LGNSW), Councillor Keith Rhoades, urging LGNSW to run a state-wide campaign on this issue, given it affects communities across our State.

To avoid further mutilation of trees by Ausgrid contractors in the interim, I will seek a formal commitment from Ausgrid that their contractors will use best practice – as defined by the City of Sydney in conjunction with other Councils and major industry associations – when pruning trees, and abide by the Australian Standard for the Pruning of Amenity Trees. This would rule out destructive practices, such as lopping.

I will also urge the Premier to insist that contract conditions attached to the recent leasing of 50.4 per cent of the Ausgrid network includes clear conditions for the successful lessee that tree pruning must be in accordance with best practice and follow the Australian Standard for the Pruning of Amenity Trees.

RECOMMENDATION

It is resolved that Council:
(A) note the destructive tree pruning practices used by Ausgrid contractors which:

  1. (i)  are excessive, unnecessary, and not based on a risk management approach, but simply “one size fits all”;
  2. (ii)  take no account of tree species and growth rates, formative pruning that may have been carried out by local authorities, tree location, maintenance regime or risk of failure;
  3. (iii)  effectively use ‘lopping’ which is described as an ‘unacceptable practice’ in the Australian Standard for the Pruning of Amenity Trees, increasing the cost of pruning as the trees require more frequent visits and thus failing not only in terms of the environment and urban amenity, but economically; and

 (iv) is not based on evidence, but on spurious claims, such as the risk of children climbing trees and being electrocuted;

  1. (B)  note that the best way to avoid tree mutilation while providing greater energy reliability, improved safety and a better urban environment is to place power lines underground;
  2. (C)  request the Lord Mayor write to the Premier seeking a commitment that:
    1. (i)  power lines in NSW will be placed underground as a matter of urgency; and
    2. (ii)  the contract for the leasing of 50.4 per cent of the Ausgrid network include conditions that pruning of trees across the network be in accordance with best practice and compliant with the Australian Standard for the Pruning of Amenity Trees;
  3. (D)  request the Lord Mayor write to Ausgrid seeking a written assurance that any pruning of trees be in accordance with best practise, [sic] compliant with the Australian Standard for the Pruning of Amenity Trees (which requires pruning be undertaken by third parties with Arboriculture qualifications – not ‘tree loppers’); and
  4. (E)  request the Lord Mayor write to the President of Local Government NSW, Councillor Keith Rhoades, asking Local Government NSW to run a state-wide campaign about compliance of electricity networks with the Australian Standard for the Pruning of Amenity Trees.

COUNCILLOR CLOVER MOORE  – Lord Mayor”

Here is your urban forest - on the ground.

Here is your urban forest – on the ground.  

I am posting these photos purely to counterbalance yesterday’s post.  Having access to a river makes us a very fortunate community in my opinion.  Even better is the waterbirds & other wildlife that we come across when we are lucky.   Here is what we saw today during a short bicycle ride.

White-faced heron waits and watches the river.

White-faced heron waits and watches the river.

A close-up of his beautiful face.

A close-up of his beautiful face.

Ten Masked lapwings sit beside the river. I've not seen so many together before. One the way back their number had expanded to eleven.

Ten Masked lapwings sit beside the river. I’ve not seen so many together before. On the way back their number had expanded to eleven.

A close-up. I love their yellow mask.

A close-up. I love their yellow mask.

Half a dozen Little corellas flew in to rest in a tall tree.

Half a dozen Little corellas flew in to rest in a tall tree.

A young White-faced heron seen on the way home. He was within 1.5-metres of the path.

A young White-faced heron seen on the way home. He was within 1.5-metres of the path.

 

A section of Landing Lights Wetland.

A small section of Landing Lights Wetland.

A view into the very large Spring Street Wetlands, which were officially opened in 1994.

A view into the very large Spring Street Wetlands, which were officially opened in 1994.  They have been deemed of “limited ecological value.”  Who decided this I don’t know.

Raised boardwalk Landing Lights Wetland with sign listing bird species in this area.

Raised boardwalk Landing Lights Wetland with a sign listing the bird species that live in this area.

Some local news to make you gasp.

Developer John Boyd Properties wants to have the Kogarah Golf Course moved so that they can build a 100-hectare development featuring 5,000 new dwellings & a new St George Stadium sports stadium at a cost of $100 million.  A development application was submitted to Bayside Council in November 2016.  See – http://bit.ly/2j6sY3e

“Peter Munro from the Cooks River Valley Association said there were two key issues: the impact of development on local species, and the alienation of public land“It’s such a fragile area,” he said. “Botany Bay and its environs contain some of the most important natural but threatened sites on the NSW coast, made all the more remarkable by the fact that the Bay is one of the more developed landscapes in Sydney. “Also once it becomes a golf course, there’s no broad community access. It’s closed to the public.”

The relocated golf course will be built “across 52 hectares of parkland in the southern precinct of the Cook Cove site, which takes in Barton Park, a number of wetlands, and the heritage-listed Arncliffe Market Gardens.”

To soften the community the developers say they will build a public walkway through the golf course, a bird-watching space near the Landing Lights Wetlands & ponds for the green & golden bell frogs.  The M5 6-lane motorway is expected to go through this area.

In the Development Application, the Spring Street Wetland was deemed of “limited ecological value” & so will be removed. This area is thick with trees & mangroves.  If you stand & listen, you can hear the tweeting of many little birds.  This habitat is perfect for them.  Undoubtedly other wildlife calls this area home, but I have not walked through this wetland.

The developer says that they will remediate Landing Lights Wetland, the surrounding saltmarsh & mangroves thereby creating new habitat for endangered green & golden bell frogs & migratory wading birds.

The fact is that all the wildlife that use & fly across the world from as far away as Siberia to the Landing Lights Wetland are doing really well without human intervention. Yes, many years ago a couple of roads have been built & there is a run-down empty stadium, but on the whole, the land has been left alone for decades, apart from remediation efforts by the council & the community.

Bayside Council (nee Rockdale Council) says on their website –

  • “Although highly urbanised, the City has retained several small bushland and wetland areas which play an important role in terms of providing food, habitat and shelter for native animals. These areas are deemed to have ‘conservation value’ (meaning they are worth preserving for future generations) because they represent ecosystems that would otherwise be lost.”
  • “These remaining natural areas are home to particularly diverse, endangered and/or vulnerable species of flora and fauna. A total of 180 native plant species and over 90 vertebrate species of terrestrial animals (not including marine fish) have been identified in the City’s bushland and wetlands.”
  • “Landing Lights Wetland (also known as Riverine Park Wetlands), located at Spring Street, Banksia is one of Council’s most environmentally significant natural areas. The site contains some of the last remaining saline wetlands on the Cooks River and includes vegetation identified as threatened under NSW legislation (salt-marsh).”
  • “The wetlands have aesthetic, heritage and environmental value. They form part of a system of tidal and freshwater swamps, and provide important habitats for a variety of animal and plant species, including common wetland birds and a number of protected migratory birds.”

I presume the birds, frogs & other wildlife will need to fit in to pockets created in the new golf course.  Seriously, how will this work?  How will they save & relocate the green & gold frog?  How will migratory birds adapt so fast to radical changes to their habitat that has been here for thousands of years?

The developer also says this area contaminates the Cooks River.  The Cooks River is contaminated by storm water outlets along the length of the river.  However, wetlands that have been here for thousands of years naturally & perfectly clean the water before it reaches Botany Bay.  I cannot see why it wouldn’t do the same for any water that goes from the wetlands to the river either.   It would be horrible to leave all the other pollution problems of the river as is & destroy remnant wetlands in the name of improving the water quality of the river.

This wet & boggy land will need to be filled in to allow people to play golf.    To me this is a tragedy.  Why is this precious remnant wetland even up for development? 

I understand the concerns of the Kogarah Golf Club for their security of tenure, as they rent from Sydney Airport & Bayside Council.   Their website says they have “been in existence for over 80 years,” so tenure seems pretty solid.    What is unfortunate is that the golf course has temporarily lost 9-holes to the building of the M5 twin tunnels as part of connecting the WestConnex motorway. There will also be a ventilation stack within the golf course, which is not good.   However, it comes down to a ventilation stack in a golf course or a ventilation stack in amongst high-rise housing.

And then there are the trees.   Like any golf course, Kogarah Golf Course has possibly thousands of trees & some of these trees are spectacular & should be classified as ‘significant’ & protected.  Many of these trees will likely be lost to high-rise development.   This whole green space will be lost to development.

It’s not a good counterargument to say that there will be new trees in the new golf course.  It takes time for new trees to grow & importantly, the destruction of remnant biodiversity rich wetlands for a golf course is a patently poor exchange.

In reality, all this environmental destruction will be happening so a developer can sell apartments that have water views of the Cooks River, Wolli Creek, Muddy Creek & of Botany Bay.  Water views spell MONEY – big money.  

My impression of Bayside Council when I have spoken with them is that they are fiercely protective & proud of their natural environment.  Their website confirms this.  They have done some brilliant work along the Wetland Highway & Botany Bay.  My hope is that Bayside Council refuse this development application, protect Landing Lights Wetland & the other wetlands & allow them to remain undeveloped into perpetuity.

Our city is changing fast & it is likely that in the next 10-15 years our suburbs will contain more high-rise than not.  Pockets of biodiversity rich habitat will become even more precious & rare.  These places will be vitally important to help the wildlife survive – else there will be very little of worth & no connectivity & we as a community will be much poorer as a result.

If you want to learn more & see the natural landscape that is at risk, you can watch ‘The Corridor.’  “The Corridor” explores the conflict between our desire to hold on to natural areas and the ever-pressing push for development, concentrating on one location, and one road.  The location is Rockdale, NSW, Australia. The road is the F6 extension.”  This video was made in 2015 before the issue of 5,000 new dwellings & the relocation of the golf course was publically raised.  It’s an interesting & informative video with anti-development & pro-development sides represented & is well worth watching.    – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jDFXrqs5E-Q

You can download the development proposal here – http://bit.ly/2iORRgI While it all looks & sounds great, no new development can ever replace the wild nature of remnant lands.

Anyone can put in a submission regarding this development application because it is significant to the whole of Sydney.  You can send a submission to Bayside Council at council@bayside.nsw.gov.au quoting ‘DA-2017/179.’  The deadline for submissions is Friday 27th January 2017.  

DA image of relocation of Kogarah Golf Course.

DA image of relocation of Kogarah Golf Course.  The top shows the current location of the Kogarah Golf Course & the bottom image shows where it will be relocated to if the Development Application is approved by Bayside Council.  The land for the relocated golf course is massive & will require the destruction of biodiversity rich wetlands.  What is now 52 hectares of public land will be a private golf course & the current golf course will be high-rise housing.  This is not a win for the community, but more especially, it is devastating for the wildlife.

The current Kogarah Golf Course is just across the river from Sydney Airport. While we were on the southern side just outside the golf course, we could hear the planes revving loudly. It made us wonder how people could live here. The noise would be intolerable in our opinion.

The current Kogarah Golf Course is just across the river from Sydney Airport. While we were on the southern side just outside the golf course, we could hear the planes revving loudly.  It made us wonder how people could live here. The noise would be intolerable in our opinion.

Sign in the Riverine Parklands warming people of a massive fine or 2 years imprisonment if they damage the habitat in this location.

Sign in the Riverine Parklands warming people of a massive fine or 2 years imprisonment (or both) if they damage the habitat in this location, yet developers want this land to build a golf course.

Development on the Prices Highway at Wolli Creek. Notice how it is built right to the footpath boundary on the Princes Highway. It would have been much better if there was a green line if trees dividing the building form the highway.

Housing development on the Princes Highway at Wolli Creek built right to the footpath boundary, as is common practice. It would have been much better and healthier for the residents if there was a green line of trees dividing the building from the highway.

Medical journal ‘The Lancet’ released research that found that dementia is more common in people who live near main roads.  See – http://bit.ly/2ja2Hgh

The research was performed in Ontario, Canada.   6.6 million people were tracked from 2002 to 2012.  It was found that dementia rates rose in those people who lived close to busy roads.  This should make the government rethink their current push to build high-rise housing along major traffic thoroughfares such as Parramatta Road & the Princes Highway.

The researchers found that –

  • People who live within 50 metres of a main road had a 7% higher risk of developing dementia.
  • People who live within 50-100 metres of a main road had a 4% higher risk of developing dementia.
  • People who live within 101-200 metres of a main road had a 2% higher risk of developing dementia.
  • People who live more than 200 metres of a main road had no increase in risk of developing dementia.

“While the study only highlights an association between the two, air pollution experts said it opened up “a crucial global health concern for millions of people” and warranted further investigation to see if preventative measures could be found.”

I’d suggest increasing the urban forest, especially street trees.  For new high-rise development, instead of building right up to the footpath, space be left to create a green barrier of trees between the building & the street. Not only would this look better & create more attractive streetscapes, but the trees would help trap fine particulate matter, thereby creating a healthier environment for everyone.

It’s pretty simple really.  We do not have to create an unhealthy city unless we choose to.

 

Upgraded shared path at Kendrick Park Tempe is a big improvement on the flood zone that it was until recently.

Upgraded shared path at Kendrick Park Tempe is a big improvement on the flood zone that it was until recently.

One section of the shared path travels along the Cooks River from Tempe Railway Station to Kendrick Park.  The path goes down a slope & curves around & under the railway line.  This particular area, until very recently, would flood with the high tide.  This posed a problem for cyclists – to take their bicycle through the bracken water or not, because salt equals rust.  I doubt it was pleasant for pedestrians who didn’t want to get their feet wet either.

Inner West Council has fixed this problem & what a good job they have done.  I doubt even king tides will impact on this path now.

The sandstone wall has been replaced by a solid wall on both sides.  One is on the water side & the other on the opposite side contains a drainage system.  I think the path has been widened at the curve as well.

The area under the railway line has been caged in, I presume to stop people boarding trains from this location.  At the very least it should make it difficult for taggers to get up there.

I especially like that some of the sandstone blocks & a wooden pole has been placed in the shallows where it becomes riverbed at low tide.  It looks like thought has been put into where to place the blocks so as to enhance the view over the Cooks River & the entrance to Wolli Creek.  It’s a nice touch.

A new garden bed has been created on the Kendrick Park side, though it had not been planted when I was there.

This pathway is heavily used by both cyclists & pedestrians.  Everyone who uses this path will benefit from this work.

It’s New Year’s Eve, so I wish you all a Happy New Year & I hope 2017 is a good year for you all.  I thank you for your support & for reading my blog.  I very much appreciate it. ~ Jacqueline

Showing how the area is caged in.

Showing how the area is caged in.

A not very good photo of some of the artistically placed sandstone blocks placed in the Cooks River.

A not very good photo of some of the artistically placed sandstone blocks placed in the Cooks River.

Look at all that bat, bird, bee and other insect food.

Look at all that bat, bird, bee and other insect food.

Merry Christmas. Happy Hannukkah.  I hope that whatever you are doing today you enjoy yourself.  Jacqueline 🙂

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