Raven getting bombed by a Noisy Miner

Raven getting bombed by a Noisy Miner

Yes!  The Inner West Council meetings get streamed live to YouTube starting Tuesday 6th December 2016.  Now that’s a nice early Christmas present for those of us who are interested in decisions by council.  See media release  –http://bit.ly/2gAVfN8

I was concerned about privacy issues, but these have been cleared up by the Council Administrator Richard Pearson saying, “It is important to note the cameras positioned for the purpose of live streaming will capture video images of the decision making body of the Council and will not be focused on the public.”    So, you will be safe in the Gallery & presumably safe as a speaker addressing the Council.

Meetings start at 6.30pm.  Here is the link – www.innerwest.nsw.gov.au/CouncilMeetings

Canterbury Road Hurlstone Park - now part of the amalgamated Inner West Council.   High traffic and very few street trees.

Canterbury Road Hurlstone Park – now part of the amalgamated Inner West Council. High traffic and very few street trees despite there being room for them and power lines located on the opposite side of the road.

This week the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence in London released a report by the Imperial College looking at how to make air cleaner to “cut” death rate because air pollution is a contributing factor in whopping 25,000 deaths a year in the UK. http://bit.ly/2g8JL0B

In a separate article, dated 2nd December 2016, about air quality alerts being issued at bus stops, tube stations & roadsides across London, the mortality numbers are different.  Air pollution is now Britain’s most lethal environmental risk, killing about 40,000 people prematurely each year.”   http://bit.ly/2gcyuMw

The Imperial College report advocates the following interesting changes to lower air pollution –

  • Road speed humps should be removed because they force drivers to accelerate & decelerate thereby causing a rise in of harmful emissions air pollution.
  • Cycle lanes should be separated from vehicles by foliage. [I like this one.]
  • Cycle routes should not be along high traffic routes.
  • Instead of the traditional living room at the front of the house, it should be moved to the back of the house to put more distance from passing traffic. [This poses a problem for those living in apartments built along busy main roads.]
  • Idling any vehicle outside schools & retirement homes should be banned, again because of harmful emissions being added to the air.
  • New schools, childcare facilities & retirement homes should be built away from high traffic areas.

“…… planners must take into account the effect of air pollution when designing speed reduction schemes and that any ‘physical measures’ must be designed ‘to minimise sharp decelerations and consequences accelerations.’”

The study compared one street that had speed humps & a 20mph speed limit to a similar street with the same speed limit, but with road cushions instead of humps.  They found that a petrol driven car driving along the street with the speed humps produced –

  • 64% more Nitrogen Dioxide,
  • 47% more particulate matter &
  • almost 60% more Carbon Monoxide than the street with road cushions.

If this isn’t a great argument to dispense with or to refuse the installation of speed humps, I don’t know what is.  Speed humps are also noisy when vehicles travel over them.  Kerthump!

One thing I did not know was that using the brakes grinds very fine particulate matter which is released into the atmosphere.

Traffic flow improvement was also recommended because where there is congestion there is also an increase in air pollution.

The report also suggested public awareness initiatives such as ‘car-free days,’ charging to enter traffic congestion areas & creating clean air zones.

With the massive increase in development happening across Sydney the issue of managing & lessening air pollution is serious.   I have long been concerned about the stacks that will be popping up all over the inner west when WestConnex is up & running.

If development goes ahead with the attitude of ‘business as usual’ & without doing as much as possible to lessen air pollution, we may find that our city becomes a toxic place to live with weather reports of windy conditions being greeted with joy.  Unfortunately, all that air pollution has to go somewhere, even if it is blown away from our sky.

The dead habitat trees are visible from some vantage points

The dead habitat trees are visible from some vantage points

‘Habitat trees’ are trees that have been killed because they are considered dangerous due to dropping limbs or other issues, but left on site.  Their canopy & their branches are removed.  The trees are ringbarked & artificial hollows are carved into the remaining wood.  Sometimes, nesting boxes are also attached.

The idea is that even though dead, the trees continue to provide habitat for hollow-dependent wildlife.  About 350 Australian animals use hollows for either roosting or nesting.  It takes around 100-150 years for a tree to even start developing hollows, so our wildlife is at a distinct disadvantage with tree hollows being very scarce across Australia.

I was really pleased to see the changes around the ‘habitat trees’ in Sydney Park.  I last wrote about these trees here – http://bit.ly/2fQ9DkG

The area around both trees has been extensively planted making what I consider viable habitat for a range of species, especially small birds. Instead of two highly visible standing dead trees, the City of Sydney Council has surrounded these trees with densely planted living trees, shrubs & understory plants. To me it looks like the bush.

I am not good at estimating distances, but my guess is that it is at least 25-metres of thick bush around the two habitat trees.  Already a number of living trees are the same height as the two dead trees.  This provides supreme cover & safety for any wildlife who are using the man-made hollows.

I think what has been created here is perfect.  Real habitat has been provided for wildlife & we are not left with what could be considered an eye-sore of looking at two heavily pruned dead trees.  The trees have blended into the new landscape and are not the only thing ones eyes focus on.

You can sit in comfort at a number of places near this area & watch & listen to the birds making it great for bird photography too.

They almost disappear from other angles.  I love that City of Sydney Council plants densely in some areas.

The dead trees almost disappear from other angles. I love that City of Sydney Council plants densely in some areas.

What a sad sight this is.

What a sad sight this is.

Vale to the massive street tree on the corner of Livingstone Road & Pile Street Marrickville.  This tree has blessed us with its presence for more many decades & was a feature when I first visited Marrickville in my twenties.   I call it significant because of its size & large canopy that spread over the road.  We don’t have many street trees like this one.

Who knows what happened, but its death was quick.  Hopefully Council will replace it with another tall-growing native tree since one has managed at this site for so long.

a closer look

a closer look

little-corella-photo-by-saving-our-treesI was sent the link to this short video called, ‘How forests heal people.’    It is lovely to watch, nice to listen to & succinctly sums up the benefits that being in nature brings to human beings.

We don’t need a forest to heal, though looking at these images feels like being in a forest is a fast track way to healing.   Parks, trees, rivers, the beach, a game of golf, a trip to the mountains – all these are also effective ways to reconnect with nature & slow our brains down, thereby reaping the benefits of being in nature & starting the healing process.

Research by Planet Ark found that time spent in nature reduces a person’s chance of –

  • developing diabetes by 43%,
  • developing cardiovascular disease & stroke by 37% &
  • developing depression by 25%.

These statistics show that it makes sense being in nature & we should do it often, at least once a week even if it is a quiet wander around your garden or along the street looking at other people’s gardens.

How Forests Heal People (4.5 minutes) – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y-wHq6yY2CI

The new children's playground with barbecue area.

The new children’s playground with barbecue area.

The new moving exercise equipment area.

The new moving exercise equipment area.

The new World War II Memorial

The new World War II Memorial

New path and garden

New path and garden

Swale in Marrickville Park

New swale in Marrickville Park with new concrete paths.

We went to have a look at Marrickville Park today.  Inner West Council has recently finished an upgrade of this historic park.  It looks good, though there is a lot of concrete where there was once grass.   I concede that concrete paths do improve accessibility, so now there are more paths for people to walk & this is probably a good thing.

The south entrance off Livingstone Road takes you to a new exercise area with moving equipment.  It is good to see that Marrickville is getting the same quality of equipment as other areas of the old Marrickville municipality.    The ground surface is made of what appears to be synthetic material that is super soft & bouncy.

I noticed one of the two new drinking fountains has a bowl that allows both dogs & birds to access fresh water, which is wonderful.  I’ve been noticing these as a norm in many parks, but not at the southern suburbs of the old Marrickville municipality.  It is a shame that both bubblers don’t have this extra water bowl, but having one is a great improvement.    Both bubblers have drainage at the base to take water away instead of creating muddy puddles.

Beside the exercise area is a large swale, which I presume will collect any rainwater & allow it to soak into the ground purifying it of pollutants before it reaches the Cooks River.  I love swales & think the more we have the better.

This swale evolves into a long wide garden area that travels all the way to the original path lined with historic palm trees.  The garden area is covered with geotextile to stop the weeds & keep in moisture.  It has been planted out with bottle brush, pig face, native grasses & 8 new advanced-sized Melaleuca trees.  These trees will provide food for the wildlife.  They look great now, but when mature they will look fantastic, as these trees generally develop beautiful canopies when they do not have to suffer severe pruning for power lines.

There is new lighting.  They look good, are unobtrusive & have been placed on the opposite side of the path & of newly planted trees, which means that trees will not need to be pruned to accommodate the lights.

I was pleased to see that all the trees have had the grass removed from around their trunk & this area mulched.  This is much better for the trees.  It protects them from mower & whipper-snipper damage & also keeps the ground moist & cool for the roots.  It is standard practice these days, so it is great to see our trees get this treatment, especially the historic trees.  I thank Council for this.

At intervals along the new pathway are metal circles engraved with a local sports person’s name & their sport.  This is a nice way to commemorate local sporting greats without making it look like a cemetery, as I have seen elsewhere.

A new war memorial has been created to remember those residents of Marrickville, Newtown, St Peters, Petersham & Camperdown who died in World War II.    The garden bed has been planted with Rosemary.

Next to the new children’s playground is the new barbeque area.  Two wooden tables with wooden bench seats have been placed next to the electric barbeque & there are garbage bins close by.  Two new trees have been planted to eventually provide natural shade.  I suspect this may be a popular place on summer evenings.

The children’s playground is exciting.  Even I had a bounce on one of the three in-ground trampolines.  The surface area here is as soft as around the exercise equipment.  The playground is covered by two shade cloths, while new trees have been planted that will eventually create natural shade.   There is climbing equipment, a tunnel slide, swings of different kinds, benches to sit on & a cubby house.

It looks fun & the kids that were there were obviously enjoying themselves.  It appears we have passed the era of sad-looking playgrounds.  This playground is an entertainment centre in itself.  Here children have all kinds of opportunities to exercise & learn new skills while enjoying themselves.  The adults also have comfortable places to sit.

From the central path with the palm trees to the Croquet Club are 26 new trees.  That is a boon!   One species is the Oriental Plane (Platanus orientalis) – a deciduous tree native to south eastern Europe to west Asia.  It is a fast growing tree with horizontal branching that can grow to 20-30 metres tall.   Fossil specimens of this tree from over 100 million years ago in the earlier Cretaceous period have been found.

Another is Pin oak (Quercus palustris) – a deciduous tree native to the USA & Canada. Can grow to 15-metres with a canopy spread of around 8-metres. It develops deep bronze to red leaves in autumn.  The Little corellas like to eat the small acorns, so even though not native to Australia, it does provide food for wildlife.  A fig tree has been planted & also a couple of Firewheel trees, which is wonderful.

A new white picket fence (in keeping with tradition) has been erected around the oval & it looks nice.

I have two areas of concern.  One is that a mature Brushbox tree that was near the entrance on the south side off Livingstone Road died 2-3 years ago & unfortunately was not replaced by Council.  The tree was there for decades.  Now there is a triangle of concrete pathways with nothing but grass & one bench.  There is lots of space to replace this tree without taking away from any of the new activities or plantings here.  The space looks empty to my mind & I would like to see this tree replaced to fill what is now a visual hole.

The second issue that concerns me is Council’s plan not to replace any of the Brushbox trees that are growing on the hill surrounding half of the oval.  This appears to be a matter of personal taste with the designer because it does not make sense to me.   Trees have been growing here successfully for many decades, perhaps 80-100 years.  Growing on raised ground means that these trees are higher than usual & therefore more visible.  To me this is a good thing in a suburb where roofs are generally more visible than trees.

Of major importance though, is people sit under these trees to watch the games.  They also sit in the shade to have picnics, read books or just chill.  There are 10 mature Brushbox trees here & while we were walking around, 5 of the trees had people sitting or lying underneath them.  Where else are you going to do this in the shade if these trees go?    People are unlikely to place a blanket under the lovely Brushbox trees growing next to busy Livingstone Road & Frazier Street because sitting or lying next to traffic is not conducive to feeling relaxed.

From memory all but one of the new trees are planted next to the pathway or next to the children’s playground.  The other 8 new trees are planted inside a garden area, again next to the path.  My bet is people won’t want to lay a blanket next to a path.  It is not the same as the area on the hill under those beautiful trees.   Shade was much needed this afternoon as it is a hot day.

For Council not to replace trees at this location removes not only beauty, but also a place for people to sit safely in the shade to watch games or to relax.  We need Council to plant trees wherever there is an opportunity, not decide not to replace trees where they have historically been.

I would like Council to replace these trees as they die or need to be removed & replace them with the same species. Brushbox are good for wildlife & they have a most beautiful canopy, especially from beneath.  It would be nice to carry on some of the historical plantings into the next hundred years for people to enjoy like we have.

Finally, I like that the rose garden has been retained.  It is one of those old worldly characteristics that gives this park its unique character.

Council have done good work in this upgrade.  The park has become popular for exercise groups, so the moving exercise equipment will be appreciated.  New trees & gardens are always wonderful & the children’s playground is a big improvement on what was there before.  All up, it looks great.

A Brushbox tree stood here for decades.  When it was removed it was not replaced leaving a gaping hole.  I think this area would be much improved if the tree was replaced with the same species.

A Brushbox tree stood here for decades. When it was removed it was not replaced leaving a gaping hole. I think this area would be much improved if the tree was replaced with the same species to match the row of Brushbox trees on the right.

People making use of the shade provided by the trees on the hill.  Trees are needed and appropriate in this area.

People making use of the shade provided by the trees on the hill. Trees are needed and appropriate in this area.  Note that no-one is sitting in the sun.

Three groups of people under three trees on this hill.  It is unthinkable that these trees will not be replaced when they die or need to be removed.

Three groups of people under three trees on this hill. It is unthinkable that these trees will not be replaced when they die or need to be removed.

Spectators under another Brushbox on the hill.

Spectators under another Brushbox on the hill.

 

 

 

People gathered hear talks about the project under the beautiful fig tree that was saved from death by brackish water & erosion.

People gathered hear talks about the project under the beautiful fig tree that was saved from death by brackish water & erosion.

Here is a 2014 photo of the same tree showing the erosion and exposed roots.

Here is a photo I took in 2014 of the same tree showing the erosion and exposed roots.

Looking at the saved Fig tree, the habitat area and up the Alexandra Canal

Looking at the saved Fig tree, the habitat area and up the Alexandra Canal from the lookout area.  On the far right is a great model that shows how stormwater travels along hard surfaces.  

A close-up of the restored bank. Plants have been placed in slots and below the current tide line, intertidal block pools have been created.  These all offer habitat for a range of creatures.

A close-up of the restored bank. Plants have been placed in slots and below the current tide line, intertidal block pools have been created. These all offer habitat for a range of creatures.  The sandstone blocks have been left in the river to continue their work offering habitat.

This morning I went to the Community Open Day celebrating the newly upgraded Alexandra Canal & other works beside Tempe Recreation Reserve.

The event was opened by an indigenous man who said the area was near enough to the meeting point of three indigenous tribes.  After a short speech about the Cooks River, he welcomed us to Country.

Then representatives from Sydney Water & the contractor Total Earth Care each gave short talks explaining what they had done with the river bank.  They appeared very happy with the outcome & so they should be.  It looks excellent.

I asked how long the work on the banks should last & was told it will see us all out.  I think it is wonderful that this restoration work will be long-lasting.  I am used to seeing work all around the place last a decade if that.

I had other commitments, so was not able to stay for the full program.  Unfortunately, I missed what promised to be a very interesting talk about the indigenous history of the area, plus actual exhibits.  I also missed a talk & showing of a variety of animals & insects that Taronga Zoo brought to the park, though I did get to see a gorgeous echidna before their talk.  It was very windy, so the echidna wanted to burrow in hay & get out of the wind, but I was lucky enough to get a photo of him.

So what is the restoration like & why all the fuss about a river/canal bank?  Firstly, the lovely & significant Fig tree that was badly affected by erosion & had many roots submerged in brackish water every time the tide came in is now sitting pretty in thickly mulched soil as it should be.  It is now one happy tree.

Had the erosion continued, it is highly likely we would have lost this tree.  It has a beautiful bowl-shaped canopy that reaches all the way to the ground – something we don’t see much in this area anymore.

The area between this tree & another large old fig tree on the point has been made into a garden habitat area & lookout with signage that explains the work done, the ecological significance & also the history of this area.   I think the signage is excellent, as it may change the culture of many who use this park by encouraging them to respect the park & the river.

I’ve noticed minimal vandalism & littering at Cup & Saucer Creek Wetland & also the bank restoration work in the same area – both major restoration works by Sydney Water.  People read the signage & learn how important to the river & the wildlife this work is.   The outcome has been negligible rubbish left behind & signs, structures, seating & re-vegetated areas have been mostly left alone & not destroyed or graffitied.  I hope the same level of respect happens here in Tempe Recreation Reserve.

From the lookout area you can see right along the curve of the bank with all the new sandstone & slots that hold plants.  It looks fabulous.

I had a chat with the contractor & was told that they used 1,742 slabs of sandstone to complete the work.  Each slab was hand-cut into eight pieces.  These were then laid to form the wall.  Each slot in the wall was also hand-cut.  To me this is a significant feat.   Some of the slots create intertidal block pools – places for small fish, seaweeds, snails, shellfish & small crabs to live.  Block pools have also been created above the tideline to cater for any future sea level rise.

When you look at the wall, each slab has its own unique markings.  It’s quite attractive. The slope of the wall also allows birds to perch safely away from people.  Crabs will benefit too.

The work is much more than saving a significant tree, restoring the bank & building a lookout area.  Sydney Water has done re-vegetation work all the way to the bridge over the Alexandra Canal.  They created curved garden habitat areas that swing around & encapsulate the fig trees, surrounding them with mulch & plants, therefore protecting them from people.  I like this very much.

Many of the trees have repeatedly had bark gouged out by people of all ages intent on engraving their initials.  This is a relatively new pastime, starting only a couple of years ago.  I’ve seen kids standing at the tree using kitchen knives to cut into the trunk while adults looked on.

Damaging the bark is a very quick was to introduce disease into trees & can bring about their early death, so I am very pleased that the tree trunks are now protected by plantings all around them.  The tree canopies are big enough to provide shade on the lawn areas outside of the garden areas, so picnicking people will still be able to access much needed shade.

A range of native plants have been planted & a good number too.    It is not stingy planting.   It looks good now, so will look terrific once grown.

The work makes this area look maintained & cared for, which also may change the culture of some who use this park for recreation.  I imagine it will be harder to leave lots of garbage behind when it is obvious that a lot of work & money has gone into making this a beautiful place.  Here is hoping anyway.  It would be nice to be able to spend time in this park without feeling upset at the amount of garbage left around or blowing into the river.

All the fences along the canal have been replaced & they are attractive to look at.  Fences are needed here to keep people safe because the bank is steep & the drop is dangerous.  Fences will also stop people from driving their car to the bank & launching their speedboats into the river at this location.

All in all, Sydney Water & contractor Total Earth Care should feel proud of what they achieved.  The community has benefited by this major improvement to our park & the wildlife now have additions that will help improve their life.

Beauty always lifts the spirit, so this work will make people feel happier after time spent here.  I also think the work will educate people as to the importance of the river & its ecology.  Hopefully, this will spinoff into respectful behavior toward the river & the park environment.

Lastly, Tempe Recreation Reserve is highly visible from the Airport Drive.  I am sure many thousands of people look & wonder about this park every day.  Now when they are driving past they will get an excellent look at the bank restoration work & instead of seeing a rundown eroded area filled with weeds & junk, they will see beauty.  The benefits will flow on further than just the users of the park.  To me this is priceless.

A massive thank you to Sydney Water & contractor Total Earth Care from me.  You give me hope that one day the Cooks River & the Alexandra Canal will be restored & we will have a healthy river system once again.  All work here is worth it many times over.

A section of the educational signage that shows the sandstone riverbank.  I was amazed to read that dugong bones with butcher marks had been excavated when the Alexandra Canal was constructed. Dugongs lived here about 5,500-years-ago.

A section of the educational signage that shows the sandstone riverbank. I was amazed to read that dugong bones with butcher marks had been excavated when the Alexandra Canal was constructed.  Dugongs lived here about 5,500-years-ago.

Lots of exhibits were bought along for the talk on the indigenous history of the area.  I was amazed to read that dugong bones with butcher marks had been excavated when the Alexandra Canal was constructed.  Dugongs lived here about 5,500-years-ago.

Lots of exhibits were bought along for the talk on the indigenous history of the area. 

The lookout area is surrounded by seating height sandstone blocks, which I imagine will be really popular.

The lookout area is surrounded by seating height sandstone blocks, which I imagine will be really popular.

Two more sandstone seats were installed further along the Canal.  They look great.

Two more sandstone seats were installed further along the Canal. They look great.  You can see the garden area curve around the fig tree.

Looking down at the new sandstone river bank at the lookout area.  I think this looks very attractive.

Looking down at the new sandstone river bank at the lookout area. I think this looks very attractive.  

More habitat areas alongside the Alexandra Canal.  This will look amazing in a few months time.  It travels all the way to the bridge over the Canal.  The bitumen road has been painted rusty red with signage saying that it is a shared zone.  It looks cared for.

More habitat areas alongside the Alexandra Canal. This will look amazing once it all grows. The habitat area travels all the way to the bridge over the Canal. The bitumen road has been painted rusty red with signage saying that it is a shared zone. The whole area now looks cared for.

Lastly, an echidna who came for a visit from Taronga Zoo.

Lastly, an echidna who came for a visit from Taronga Zoo.  This is only the second echidna I have seen, so quite a treat.

Photographer unknown.  Sourced from Pinterest.

Photographer unknown. Sourced from Pinterest.

So sad to read of the death of the 88-year-old Jacaranda tree in the south-eastern quadrangle of Sydney University.  It fell quietly overnight on Friday 28th October 2016.  http://bit.ly/2eKF9Qn

This tree was planted in 1928 by Professor EG Waterhouse & had a massive 18-metre wide canopy.  It was included in the City of Sydney’s Significant Tree Register.

It had ganoderma fungal decay in the base of its trunk, which was known to the university, though tests are being done to confirm the cause of death.  It’s very nice to see such interest in a tree.

In 2014, Sydney University took cuttings of this Jacaranda tree & have successfully grafted two clones – so the genes of this iconic & much loved tree will continue to live on.

Showing the tree that was saved, the new garden area and the new viewing area.  Photo January 2016

Showing the tree that was saved, the new garden area and the new viewing area. Photo January 2016.  

Sydney Water & contractor Total Earth Care are holding a Community Open Day to celebrate the newly upgraded Alexandra Canal beside Tempe Reserve.

I last wrote about this work in January 2016 & was impressed with the extent of restoration work that had been done.  I am sure it looks quite different from my last visit.  See – http://bit.ly/1ZjIYhv

WHEN:          Saturday 5 November 2016.

TIME:             10 – 12 noon.

WHERE:        Next to the Alexandra Canal at Tempe Recreation Reserve.

Parking available in the park at the end of Holbeach Avenue Tempe.

Well I wish it was a trip to Canada for two that kept me away from this blog for so long.  Life in my family is almost back to normal, so I should be posting regularly again.

Here are some birds nests to celebrate Spring.   No photo unfortunately, but our local Red Wattle birds now have two fledglings, which makes successful breeding in a street tree for this pair three years in a row.

A Magpie is back nesting in a local fig tree.  It is nice to see the same pair breeding in the same tree a year later.  A chick’s head was seen moving today, so we expect to see at least one more in the next couple of days.  Last year this pair had two sets of chicks.  The first three fledglings left the nest in November to be looked after by Dad, while Mum returned to the nest to sit on another clutch that hatched in December.  Then the whole family joined together to look after the youngest two.

A Magpie is back nesting in a local fig tree, also a street tree. It is nice to see the same pair breeding in the same tree a year later. A chick’s head was seen moving yesterday, so we expect to see at least one more in the next couple of days. Last year this pair had two sets of chicks. The first three fledglings left the nest in November to be looked after by Dad, while Mum returned to the nest to sit on another clutch that hatched in December. Then the whole family joined together to look after the youngest two.

Canterbury Racecourse is a biodiversity hotspot being located next to the Cooks River with great expanses of grass & quite a few substantial trees.   A Raven holds the highest nesting site right up with the powerful lights that illuminate the track.

Canterbury Racecourse is a biodiversity hotspot being located next to the Cooks River with great expanses of grass & quite a few substantial trees. A Raven holds the highest nesting site right up with the powerful lights that illuminate the track.

A Willy Wagtail has a tiny nest on a horizontal branch of a London plane tree.  It was hard to spot.

A Willy Wagtail has built a tiny nest on a horizontal branch of a London plane tree. It was hard to spot.

In another London plane tree is a mud nest of a Magpie lark.

In another London plane tree is a mud nest of a Magpie lark.

Lastly, Fairy Martin nests can be found all over the race course & it is easy to spot these birds flying above the grass catching insects.  Each little beak full of mud can be easily seen in this nest.

Lastly, Fairy Martin mud nests can be found all over the race course & it is easy to spot these birds flying above the grass catching insects. 

 

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