All the grassed area from the foreground to the arrow at the pedestrian bridge over the Cooks River will be naturalised.  No more concrete & no more fence.

All the grassed area from the foreground to the arrow at the pedestrian bridge over the Cooks River will be naturalised. No more concrete & no more fence.

Plan of the naturalisation works at Cup and Saucer Creek.  If the end result looks anything like the Cup and Saucer Creek Wetland, this will be a beautiful place indeed.

Plan of the naturalisation works at Cup and Saucer Creek.   If the end result looks anything like the Cup and Saucer Creek Wetland, this will be a beautiful place indeed.

Last month I went to an information event at Cup & Saucer Creek put on by Sydney Water.  The event was to display their upcoming works along the Cooks River at this location.

They will be removing the concrete from just past Cup & Saucer Creek wetland all the way to the pedestrian bridge over the river at the Sugar Factory apartments.  Work is due to start this month & may have already started at the time of this post.

If I remember correctly, twelve trees will need to be removed to allow for the current grassy area to be sloped naturally down to the river.  However, they do plan to plant many new trees & a couple of the larger trees closer to Cup & Saucer Creek wetland will be retained.  A saltwater wetland will be created, as well as compressed clay paths, seating & a viewing platform.  The ugly fence will not be necessary.

Stormwater catchment model

Stormwater catchment model

There was a great model at the event, which is used at schools & other educational events to demonstrate the impact hard surfaces have on stormwater management.  It clearly showed the benefits of permeable surfaces, be they gardens, verges, rain gardens, swales or wetlands.

From Sydney Water’s website – “Riverbank naturalisation can take different forms, but generally involves the removal of some, or all of the steep concrete channel bank & creating a more gently sloping bank. This is stabilised with native plants, trees & rocks. Naturalisation creates a softer landscape feel & can greatly improve the riverbank habitat for native birds & other animals.  Wetlands can also be established as part of the naturalisation process. Wetlands have a significant role in improving the river’s ecology & health by treating stormwater runoff from streets & industrial areas, before it enters the river.”

I am quite excited by this remediation work, as I believe it will have a great & positive impact for the wildlife, as well as return a more natural look to the river.  Apparently we have turtles in the river & they will be able to leave the water at these more natural places.

It is costing a lot of money to remove the damage done in the past, but every little bit of naturalisation helps.  I was told that further up the river at Strathfield, concrete that is degrading is not being replaced.  Hopefully one day the Cooks River will have no concrete walls.  Wouldn’t that be wonderful.

I’ll post some photos of this site & Whidden Reserve when the work is done.  I wrote about the other remediation sites along the river here –  http://bit.ly/StsjU6

All the trees will yellow dots will be removed.  Luckily the large tree on the left gets to stay.   I suspect most of the trees located on the other side of Cup and Saucer Creek will need to be removed too.

All the trees will yellow dots will be removed. Luckily the large tree on the left gets to stay. I suspect most of the trees located on the other side of Cup and Saucer Creek will need to be removed too.

Another of the trees to be removed.

Another of the trees to be removed.    The big tree on the left is planned to be retained.

Two more small trees that will be removed.

Two more small trees that will be removed.

Another two trees for removal.

Another two trees for removal.

 

 

 

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