Marrickville gateway to the shopping strip. The trees along here are at least 2 years old.

Marrickville gateway to the shopping strip. The prunus street tree at the bottom of the image is one of a row along here & at least 2-years-old.  Two of the trees visible around the Town Hall on the left have been removed & the pencil pines are due to be removed.

Compare with Chatswood  town centre with 4 storey street trees.

Compare with Chatswood town centre with 4 storey street trees.

I love it when I receive emails pointing me to media articles that prove to me that my observations about Marrickville’s urban forest are correct. An article in yesterday’s Sunday Telegraph said –

“A survey of the city’s tree canopy shows Botany Bay has fewer trees than any other suburb, with just 12 per cent leaf cover.

Next comes nearby Randwick, with 14 per cent, and beachside Waverley is also near the bottom with only 17 per cent. Other suburbs under 20 per cent include Auburn, Marrickville, Holroyd and Strathfield.”

Suburbs blessed with a tree canopy of above 50% were Pittwater, Warringah & Ku-ring-gai. Suburbs with more than 30% canopy were Lane Cove, Hunters Hill & Ryde. Manly, North Sydney, Penrith, Liverpool & Burwood followed. These statistics were gathered by the University of Technology Sydney & compiled by the 202020 Vision.

The 202020 Vision is a national initiative that includes government, local councils, the private sector, individuals & academics. The initiative was launched in November 2013, well before Marrickville Council’s new Street Tree Master Plan was released.

The 202020 Vision has the wonderful aim to increase urban green space by 20% by 2020. They want more trees, gardens, green walls & green roofs, because these will improve the livability of our suburbs & cities, as well as the health & wellbeing of the community & wildlife.  The use of hard surfaces, increased development & a rising population is creating urban heat islands & poor air quality.

Of course the urban forest & public trees are a major part of this. I have heard some of the Marrickville Councillors saying on a number of occasions in Council Meetings that we have enough public trees & one even said that we may even have too many.  Another Councillor even wanted all the street trees removed from the historic Abergeldie Estate in Dulwich Hill.

I must say that I find it exciting to see a strong movement to increase the canopy of Sydney.  To me trees are a public health issue & the research backs me up on this.  Maybe one day Marrickville Council will publicize on their website & in newsletters such as ‘Marrickville Matters’ just how many trees they target to plant & how many they actually planted each year. That would be good.

I will post more about the 202020 Vision soon. To read the Sunday Telegraph’s article, see – http://bit.ly/1zixCtJ

Sydenham from the air. The expanse of green space is Sydenham Green where there trees are planted mostly around the perimeter and along pathways.

Sydenham from the air. The expanse of green space at the top of the photo is Sydenham Green, where there trees are planted mostly around the perimeter and along pathways.  Street trees are amost invisible.

 

Advertisements