Anti-litter sign at Cooks Park at Dolls Point.  These were at every entrance, in the car park & also on many sides of the toilet blocks & other buildings.  There was onky three pieces of litter in the park & this was at the end of a sunny day.

Anti-litter sign at Cooks Park at Dolls Point. These were at every entrance, in the car park & also on many sides of the toilet blocks & other buildings. The park was clean & so were the waterways.

At one of the pedestrain entrances.

At one of the pedestrain entrances.  I believe this educates & fosters pride for the environment.

I went to Cooks Park at Dolls Point last weekend & was impressed by many aspects of this section of the park. I say “this section” because Cooks Park travels for 8.5kms through seven suburbs from the Cooks River, along the length of the Botany Bay foreshore all the way to the Georges River.   The section at Dolls Point is near the Georges River end.

This sign was on three sides of the toilet block - visible, but unobtrusive.

This sign was on three sides of the toilet block – visible, but unobtrusive.

My friend took me specifically to see the massive sign at the entrance to the park that said – “LEAVE ONLY YOUR FOOTPRINTS.”   The sign said it was part of a “Litter abatement plan – an action plan to reduce littering in Cooks Park.”

These signs were at all pedestrian entrances, in the car park & at the entrances to public toilets.  To say I was impressed was an understatement.  Especially after a long walk through the park & only three pieces of litter were picked up.

Cooks Park is as busy as our parks along the Cooks River, but it is not suffering piles of barbeque coal & tons of litter flying or lying around.  There was no string or discarded fishing line either & a significant number of people were at the park while we were there.  I’d say Rockdale Council’s litter abatement plan is working.

Dead trees have been left in place for their beneficial impact on local ecology.

Dead trees have been left in place for their beneficial impact on local ecology.  I love that there is very few concrete paths in this park.

This is filled with magnificent  trees.  The Pines, Norfolk Island pines & Coral trees are all classified ‘culturally significant.’  Many of the trees are veterans & historic to the area.  No tree has grass growing right up to its trunk.

My friend said she loved Cooks Park because she needed to strain her neck to look up at the trees. It’s true. More than half of the trees are exceptionally tall.  Rockdale Council has also left dead trees in situ & there are large logs lying around to improve on biodiversity.

The park itself is a biodiversity hotspot & is full of birdlife, as well as marine life at the water’s edge. I watched a young eel swimming in only 10 cms of water & have seen velvet snails & sea slugs as well – all without going into the water. The Cunjevoi season is incredible to see & is visible from the pedestrian pathway.

I have always been impressed by the work Rockdale Council has done along the park & also the creeks that are part of the ‘Wetland Highway,’ – an important biodiversity corridor for the area. Even having a ‘Wetland Highway’ is a wonderful concept.

The stormwater canal, which I thought was a creek until I looked at a map, is fenced off & the banks have been left in a natural state.  Dead trees have been left in the water & it was easy to see the benefit these would bring to fish.

Juvenile Ibis taking a drink in the stormwater canal - a boon for wildlife.

Juvenile Ibis taking a drink in the stormwater canal – a boon for wildlife.

Something else I really liked was the mosaic landscapes on the walls of various buildings in the park.  These depicted the park & environs at sunrise, daytime & by moonlight.  I thought they were exceptionally beautiful & think these mosaics would foster pride in the park.  They also add rather than detract from the surrounding beauty.   There was no graffiti that I noticed & no trees sprayed with tags.

The toilet blocks along the length of Cooks Park are being clad in wooden strips that immediately give them an updated look, but also discourage graffiti & of course, make the buildings sit well in the natural environment.

There has also been extensive dune restoration work along a large section of the foreshore near the actual point.  The dunes have been sculpted, string netting has been laid & planting has started.  It looks great now & will be fantastic once all the plants have grown.  It will also be wonderful habitat for the wildlife.

Cooks Park has something for everyone.  It is well worth a visit, especially if you like trees, birds & nature.  There is so much happening here, that your focus is not only on the water.

Mosaic on one of the buildings in the park

Mosaic on one of the buildings in the park depicting sunrise.

Another mosaic, again showing the iconic trees in this park. This one depicts daytime.

Another mosaic, again showing the iconic trees in this park. This one depicts daytime.

This one depicts the moon over Botany Bay - again with the iconic trees.

This one depicts the moon over Botany Bay – again with the iconic trees.  

The very natural stormwater canal.  So nice to not see concrete!

The very natural stormwater canal. So nice to not see concrete!

Veteran Coral trees.

Veteran Coral trees.  Imagine these in flower.  Birds would be everywhere.

The shared pathway lined with Tuckeroos.  These are the shortest trees in the park.

The shared pathway lined with Tuckeroos. These are the shortest trees in the park.

Dune restoration work has started.

Dune restoration work has started.  

 

 

 

 

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