This is a notable tree in this area because of its size & its greenness.

This is a notable tree in this area because of its size & its greenness.

This is a tall street tree planted directly under power lines - inviting trouble.  You can see that it has needed pruning by the power company.

This is a tall street tree planted directly under power lines – inviting trouble. You can see that it has needed pruning by the power company.

The canopy does not look to me to be in decline.

A closer view of the canopy.

Marrickville Council have given notification of their intention to remove an Evergreen Alder (Alnus acuminata) outside 1 Wemyss Street Enmore.

Council gives the following reasons for removal –

  • “Tree is in poor health & in decline.
  • Decay to upper branches in canopy.
  • The tree is causing damage to private property & is unsustainable in its location.”

Council says they will replace this tree with a Chinese Pistachio (Pistacia chinensis), but not when they will do this.

I saw this tree today & was surprised that it is to be removed.  I have never claimed to be an expert in trees, but for most trees Marrickville Council puts up removal, the reasons are obvious.  With this tree I could not see that it was “in poor health & in decline.”   To me the canopy was full with rich green leaves.

I am unsure whether I spotted the “decay to upper branches in canopy.” It’s true that a small number of wrist-size branches that had been pruned did look as though there was some decay, but I could not see any significant decay.  However, I do know that decay can be hidden inside the tree.

“The tree is causing damage to private property ….”   The notice from Council does not specify how or where the tree is causing damage to property & I could only assume it was the front fence they were referring to.

The front garden of the property is elevated well above the footpath & the sandstone fence is functioning as a retaining wall. I would describe this as a beautiful old sandstone wall typical of the municipality.  However, I was not able to see any significant structural damage to the wall.

The wall does have some small cracks in the mortar between stones & this is the type of thing my husband would fill with a small bowl of concrete & a spatula.  I could not see any evidence of other damage to the front of the property, but this is not to say there isn’t.

Whether the damage warrants the removal of a very pleasant street tree is debatable.   However, Council says the tree is in poor health & in decline.

The Chinese Pistachio is an ornamental deciduous tree native to China & Taiwan.  It grows to around 8-metres & has bright yellow, orange & scarlet foliage in autumn.

Chinese pistachio (Pistacia chinensis) is regarded as an environmental weed in New South Wales & the ACT, & is also a potential environmental weed or “sleeper weed” in other parts of southern Australia.”   See – http://bit.ly/190nZHG

I think Marrickville Council should be making better choices – not planting trees classified as ‘environmental weeds’ in this state.

I thought the following comment on ‘Dave’s Garden’ about the Chinese pistachio was very interesting.

“On Jul 21, 2012, TreeGuyCliff from Austin, TX wrote:

If I could rate this tree more negatively than Negative, I would.

   The Chinese pistache has been planted in public spaces & sold in nurseries in Austin, Texas, for at least 20 years.  And it has turned out to be a time bomb, producing an explosively expanding wave of seedlings throughout the parks, preserves, & other natural areas throughout Central Texas.

It was initially recommended for its fall color, handsome form, moderately fast growth rate, tolerance of alkaline soils, & resistance to disease & pests.

Its invasive tendencies quickly moved it from the recommended list to the “do not plant” list. 

  As for whether its seed is viable, each female tree produces hundreds of panicles of seed, each containing hundreds of seeds. So one female tree produces tens of thousands, perhaps hundreds of thousands, of fruits.”

There were other comments classified as ‘negative’ covering different problems with this tree.   You can read them here – http://bit.ly/1AE7SHl

The deadline for any submissions is this Friday 20th March 2015.

I think decay is visible in these pruned branches.

I think decay is visible in these pruned branches.

The sandstone fence

The sandstone fence

Another view of the fence

Another view of the fence.

A crack inside the gate.

A crack inside the gate.

 

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