Australian native Bracelet Honey Myrtle to be replaced by ornamental Manchurian pear.

Australian native Bracelet Honey Myrtle to be replaced by ornamental Manchurian pear.

The yellow dot shows the tree to be removed.  It also shows the verge gardens and the other street trees.

The yellow dot shows the tree to be removed. It also shows the verge gardens and the other street trees.

Tree number 1:

Marrickville Council has given notification of their intention to remove a Bracelet Honey Myrtle (Melaleuca armillaris) outside 583 New Canterbury Road Dulwich Hill.

They give the following reasons for removal –

  • “Tree is in decline with significant canopy dieback.
  • Lean presents a significant obstruction and is a risk to public and property.
  • The tree is unsustainable in its current condition.”

Council says they will replace with a Manchurian Pear (Pyrus ussuriensis) as part of the 2016 Street Tree Planting Program.

The Manchurian Pear is a deciduous ornamental tree that grows to approximately 9-metres tall by 7-metres wide. Their leaves turn red in autumn & they produce small white flowers in late winter to early spring.  The tree produces inedible, greenish-yellow, globose fruit up to 3 cm in diameter.

As far as I am aware these trees have no benefit to wildlife, though perhaps the bees like the flowers.

Gardening Australia says the following about Manchurian Pear trees –

“The tree has inherent branch weaknesses, which means that it can fall apart & in a home garden that’s a considerable safety problem. The biggest problem is included bark, which is where the bark grows into the junction between the branches, and means you don’t really get good, firm attachment. The result is that the branch has simply peeled off and broken. Although good bark is produced to heal the wound, it’s still an unsightly feature and unsafe when the branch breaks.
 Another problem is a V-crotch or an acute branch structure. It’s where one branch has grown quickly and with the weight of foliage it acts like a lever and that can easily lead to a break.”  See – http://ab.co/1DBD68U

The Bracelet Honey Myrtle tree is one of those old gnarly street trees that many love.  Unfortunately this tree is in decline, though it is not dead yet.   I wonder whether a tree growing in these conditions with only whatever rainwater it could catch could respond to fertilizing, watering & mulching.

I feel regret when a lovely old tree that has received very little care over its life gets chopped down before any attempts to save it.  I consider this a big loss, as it is one of the nicest street trees along this stretch of road.

To replace this food-producing native with an ornamental Manchurian Pear that does nothing for wildlife is a shame.

Tree number 2: A Small-leafed Peppermint (Eucalyptus nicholii) outside 16 Ross Street Dulwich Hill.

Council gives the following reasons for removal –

  • “Subject tree is in decline/dying.
  • Identified for removal under Street Tree Inventory 2012.
  • Tree in its present state poses an unacceptable risk to public and property.”

Unfortunately this lovely tree is not doing well. It is the last big tree in the street that seems almost bare of street trees.

Council says they will replace it with a Jacaranda (Jacaranda mimosifolia) as part of the 2016 Street Tree Planting Program.  Another loss of a native for an ornamental tree.

The deadline for submissions for both trees is Friday 14th August 2015.

Small-leafed Peppermint to be removed.

Small-leafed Peppermint to be removed.

Lovely shaped branches.

Lovely shaped branches.

 

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