I was shocked to see this.  It once was a wonderful area of habitat.

I was shocked to see this. It once was a wonderful area of habitat.

This large area is now mulch

This large area is now mulch

Close to the bridge over the Cooks River at the Sugar Factory apartments & as you approach Cup & Saucer Creek Wetland there was a wonderful fairly large bush pocket. It contains roughly 40 mature trees & a number of saplings. Native grasses were growing in abundance.

It was a place full of the sound of birdsong & if you were lucky a butterfly would come flitting out. I always admired this bush pocket thinking that there aught to be more of these bushy areas that are off limits to people & which provide sanctuary, habitat & food for a huge range of wildlife.

So my mouth literally fell open when I came upon it today. All the lower branches have been pruned, so the lower part of all the trees looks like sticks. As if we don’t have enough of this everywhere we go!

The native grasses have been either removed or cut back & what was pruned from the trees has been spread as thick mulch on the ground.

I can’t imagine how many insects went through the wood chipper. As it is today it remains useful to birds, but for the rest of the wildlife, it now represents a stark unsafe place, so they had better find somewhere else to live…that is if they are still alive.

For us humans, the bulk of what made this place beautiful has gone. What was Canterbury Council thinking? This work is a major step backwards for biodiversity. Because the lower branches have been removed, this site will not be able to return to what it once was. Such a shame.

Almost every tree had been pruned.

Almost every tree had been pruned.

Mulch.

Mulch.

Even the native grasses were cut back.

Even the native grasses were cut back.

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