A truly amazing sign placed on a tree by Shoalhaven City Council.  The tree is in Sanctuary Point, which is located about 25-km south of Nowra & around 200-km south of Sydney.   Photo  by Gavin Swan & I thank him for sharing it with me.

A truly amazing sign placed on a tree by Shoalhaven City Council. The tree is in Sanctuary Point, located about 25-km south of Nowra & around 200-km south of Sydney. Photo taken by Gavin Swan & I thank him for sharing it with me.

“The spread of the built environment results on conflicts between the death of such trees and public safety. The importance of old growth remnants for native fauna habitat was recognised in the decision to retain the main parts of this tree and the numerous hollows it contains. It has also been retained to show the scale of coastal forests that once covered the area. SCC”Shoalhaven City Council.

How progressive is this!  I think this is a fabulous way to educate the community on the value of trees, especially old growth trees.  Hollows are incredibly important & they are being lost at an alarming rate.

It takes between 100-150 years before trees start creating hollows.  Eucalypts start creating hollows after dropping branches & we know that once branch-dropping starts, the tree is removed for the safety of the human population

“Australia-wide, 15% of all land birds use hollows. These 114 species include parrots, owls cockatoos & lorikeets, ducks, treecreepers, owls, owlet-nightjar, kingfishers, pardolotes, martins & woodswallows.”  ~ Sourced from Wildlife Notes, Department of Conservation & Management April 2005.

One of the least known characteristics of Australian animals is their high utilisation of tree hollows. For example, the proportion of Australian animals that use tree hollows is three times greater than in North America & twice as great as in South Africa.

About 350 Australian animals use hollows for either roosting or nesting. This includes:


  • half of our small bats, 
  • nearly 90% of our parrots, 
  • all of our gliders, 
  • all but one of our owls 
  • all of our tree-creepers. 

Nearly 20% of our birds use hollows in some way. For 60% of these, hollows are essential.” http://www.ozbox.net.au/anim&holl.htm

Of the 22 species of bats that have been recorded to utilise tree hollows in NSW, 10 of these are listed as threatened. (Gibbons & Lindenmayer 1997).

I am very impressed by this action by Shoalhaven City Council & hope that it becomes commonplace across Australia.

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