A section of Landing Lights Wetland.

Today is an excellent day!  I came home to a letter from Bayside Council in response to my submission opposing the 100-hectare development application for Barton Park & Landing Lights Wetland.

Developer John Boyd Properties wanted to build 5,000 new high-rise dwellings in what is currently the Kogarah Golf Course.  They would rebuild the golf course in the wetlands & add a sweetener of a new St George Stadium sports stadium.  Part of the heritage listed & fully functioning Arncliffe Market Gardens was to be claimed for the development as well.

The letter said – “Please be advised that the applicant has decided not to proceed with the development & accordingly the application has now been withdrawn.”

How wonderful is that!  The migratory birds that fly all the way from Siberia say thanks.  The Green & Gold frog say thanks.  All the numerous other birds, animals & insects that call this remnant wetland home say thanks as well.   If the community sat back & did nothing, I expect this development would have gone through, but they did not.

Thank you to all who opposed this development application.  Now there is a chance that this vitally important part of Botany Bay can be left for the wildlife & for the many in the community who enjoy spending time in such undeveloped areas bursting with nature.  To keep this precious area is so wonderful.

Bayside Council wrote the following on their website –

  • “Although highly urbanised, the City has retained several small bushland and wetland areas which play an important role in terms of providing food, habitat and shelter for native animals. These areas are deemed to have ‘conservation value’ (meaning they are worth preserving for future generations) because they represent ecosystems that would otherwise be lost.”
  • “These remaining natural areas are home to particularly diverse, endangered and/or vulnerable species of flora and fauna.  A total of 180 native plant species and over 90 vertebrate species of terrestrial animals (not including marine fish) have been identified in the City’s bushland and wetlands.”
  • “Landing Lights Wetland (also known as Riverine Park Wetlands), located at Spring Street, Banksia is one of Council’s most environmentally significant natural areas. The site contains some of the last remaining saline wetlands on the Cooks River and includes vegetation identified as threatened under NSW legislation (salt-marsh).”
  • “The wetlands have aesthetic, heritage and environmental value. They form part of a system of tidal and freshwater swamps, and provide important habitats for a variety of animal and plant species, including common wetland birds and a number of protected migratory birds.”

I last wrote about this development application here – http://bit.ly/2jey4Xi

Letter regarding the Cook Cove Precinct DA

 

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