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The healthy Bottlebrush  outside 3 Derby Street Camperdown.

The healthy Small leaf lilly pilly outside 7 Derby Street Camperdown

The worst part of the footpath outside 7 Derby Street. You can also see an NBN channel.

Inner West Council – Marrickville have given notice that they intend to remove 4 trees in Camperdown.

Tree number 1:  A Bottlebrush (Callistemon viminalis ) outside 3 Derby Street Camperdown.

Tree number 2:  A Small leaf lilly pilly (Syzygium species) outside 7 Derby Street Camperdown.

The footpath is narrow & has two small, but healthy trees.   I was amazed that council even notified the community of their proposed removal because they appear to be under 5-metres.

I have noticed that people tend to walk with their dog down the road of this quiet back street rather than along the footpath.   If a car does come down Derby Street, it is easy to get off the road.

To lose both these trees to replace a footpath does not seem necessary to me.  I am pretty certain that the footpath can be replaced while keeping the trees.  To replace only one of these trees in this location is another loss despite the proposed planting of a spotted gum on O’Dea Reserve around the corner.  I am not a fan of removing trees from one location to plant in another.   If there is room to plant a Spotted gum in O-dead Reserve, Council should do it anyway.

Derby Street will be down one tree.  I think Council should be looking to find more planting places for street trees, not reducing them.

Then there is the issue of new tree plantings failing to survive & if the new tree does survive, the years it will take before it produces amenity & benefits.  Currently, the two healthy trees provide both amenity & benefits.

Neither tree had a Notification of Removal sign on them.

Tree number 3:  A Weeping fig (Ficus benjamina) outside 2 Ross Street Camperdown.  I first saw the Weeping fig in 2011 when I posted about O’Dea Reserve.  Even then I was surprised this tree was allowed to remain in this position because it was causing significant issues with the footpath.  Now it has moved on to damaging the brick fence.  I highly doubt this tree was planted by Council.  Weeping figs are sold as lush pot plants & many people decide they would be good to put in the ground.  The problem is that this tree has very strong roots & can grow into a large tree.  I think it should be removed.

This tree did not have a Notification of Removal sign on it.

Tree number 4:  A Chinese hackberry (Celtis sinensis) adjacent 2A Eton Street Camperdown.   I could not find this tree.  A resident tried to help me find the address to no avail.

Council give the following reasons for wanting to remove the above trees –

  • To undertake capital footpath reconstruction and kerb extension improvement works, including replacement tree planting.
  • To remove trees that are either inappropriate species, in poor condition and/or unsustainable in the planted location.”

Council says they will replace these trees with –

  • 1  Black tea tree (Melaleuca bracteata) in road tree planting outside 7 Derby Street.
  • 1  Spotted gum (Corymbia maculata) in O’Dea Reserve.

That is 4 trees removed to be replaced with two, which is not good in my opinion.  Council do not say when they will plant them.

Black tea tree is an Australian native & is usually described as a medium sized shrub, but can reach 10-metres.  It has rough dark grey bark & produces white flowers in winter/spring/summer.  The flowers are attractive to birds, insects & butterflies.

Spotted gum is an Australian native that grows straight & tall.  It is known for its beautiful bark that shed in summer leaving behind creamy smooth bark with spots of older bark. It has dark green leaves & produces small clusters of fragrant white flowers from autumn to winter, which attract birds, bees & other insects.   It is a good tree for wildlife.

The bottom of the weeping fig in Ross Street Camperdown.  It is not too often I will say this, but this is the wrong tree for this space.

You can just see the raised wooden footpath on the right of the photo.  The tree itself is magnificent.

You can just see the raised wooden footpath on the right of the photo. The tree itself is magnificent.

I was really happy to see that the Inner West Council is installing a raised wooden footpath over the tree roots of one of the significant Fig trees in Camperdown Oval.  The tree is very special, so it is wonderful that such care is being taken to protect it.

Apart from a Fig tree in O’Dea Reserve in Stanmore, that has a large area of raised decking around it, I have not seen this kind of work done around trees in parks of the old Marrickville municipality.  I think this is a first raised footpath in the area. This is an excellent move & I hope it becomes a norm.

A lot of work is being done to upgrade Camperdown Oval.  I will write about this later when the work is finished.  It’s very nice to see more trees have been planted.

The raised footpath - excellent to see such infrastructure when Council decide that a path must be placed in a certain area.

The raised footpath – excellent to see such infrastructure when Council decide that a path must be placed in a certain area.

The tree that is having its roots protected

The tree that is having its roots protected.  The path can be seen in the middle of the photo.

An organic pocket farm has sprung up in the inner city suburb of Camperdown.

An organic pocket farm has sprung up in the inner city suburb of Camperdown.  Some of the raised garden beds can be seen, as well as the first farm patch, which is growing well.

Another view of the vegetable plot.

Another view of the vegetable plot with the back section of Camperdown Commons visible in the background.

Three enthusiastic volunteers tilling the soil of the second farm plot.

Three enthusiastic volunteers tilling the soil of the second farm plot under the ever-watchful eye of Chesty Bond.

We cycled over to have a look at Camperdown Commons today, which has been operating for just one week.  What a delightful surprise this place is. Everything screams – We Care!

A bit of history before I start waxing lyrical.

‘Camperdown Commons’ is the new name & venture of what was previously the Camperdown Bowling Club.  It is located beside Camperdown Park at 31a Mallet Street Camperdown.  The land is owned by Canterbury-Hurlstone Park RSL Club.

Under the watchful eye of ‘Chesty Bond,’ a historic figure in the Inner West, the former clubhouse has been revamped so much so that it is unrecognizable.  Two bowling greens have been transformed into large vegetable gardens.  These will be providing seasonal organic produce to the large restaurant named ‘Acre,’ which is licenced.

The restaurant itself was lovely to look at.  It was spacious & airy with windows that open fully, which will be a boon in summer.  They used a lot of wood in the construction & with the furniture, so it has a warm, soft feel.  Because much of the produce comes from the onsite farm, they can boast zero food miles, which has got to be applauded.

There is indoor eating & also a large terrace filled with tables & covered by wooden pergolas providing shade.  All around the building are raised garden beds planted with herbs & flowers.  It is very nice.  I spotted a bougainvillea, so one day there may be a riot of colour cascading over the pergolas.

The outside terrace looks over a newly planted lawn, which will be a great place for the kids to play.  On the corner next to the terrace is a wonderful children’s playground – different to any that I have seen.  The area has a sunken circle that looks like a wagon wheel on its side.  There are gabion walls & smooth logs that allow kids to walk or climb over.  There are a couple of structures that look like large framed pictures.  These have moving parts attached allowing the kids to move wheels, turn on switches & other kinds of things.

There are many semi-hollowed out logs that have been polished smooth so as not to cause splinters.  These allow kids to climb, hug & fill the hollows with mulch & rocks situated around the logs.  Some of the logs have doors that open & have latches.

There is also a large tree sculpture. I think it looks great.  While we were there, birds perched on this watching the goings on with interest.

There is no concrete.  Mulch, pebbles & clay paths make up the area.  By sinking the playground, they have made it an interesting space for children.  The space encourages children to be active without relying on the more traditional playground infrastructure & therefore encouraging more imaginative play in my opinion.

Next to the playground is a Hen House & to my delight I saw that all the hens are rescue hens – that is, saved from battery farms.  These hens won’t believe their luck.  For a chicken, it will be like coming from hell to heaven.  I was most impressed by this ethos.  The Hen House is quite lovely too.

Camperdown Commons has lots for children to see, do & learn.  They also plan for workshops & lifestyle classes.  Plus, there are also spaces for hire making this a multi-purpose site for the community.

If you don’t want to have a restaurant meal, there is a sandwich hut near the entrance. This sells all kinds of food & drinks.  The seating around this has a country feel & there is even a wheelbarrow filled with flowers & herbs.

Now to the farming side of the venture.  One of the vegetable gardens is established while the other was being tilled & planted by volunteers.   All around the garden farm are raised beds filled with herbs, flowers & vegetables.

In the common space at the back are two olive trees, another undercover area for workshops or entertainment, more raised garden beds & even a large insect hotel.  These are quite easy to make & I may write a post about these later.  To have a good garden, you need beneficial insects to do the hard work of pollinating for you. Insects will come if there is food, but if there is an onsite hotel with superior accommodation, they are likely to move in & that is what any good gardener wants.

Even the fencing around the property is interesting.  It is a mix of traditional black steel vertical bars & hardwood planks cut at at different lengths.  You can see into the property from the street, which is an added bonus.  The view inside will passively educate the passing community as to what can be achieved in unused spaces & hopefully inspire them to join in or dig up a bit of lawn in their own garden.

In the back area, panels of perspex has been attached to the inside of the fence.  This allows full visibility, but protects both the gardens & people from the wind.  I thought this was a smart addition, as cold wind can ruin most people’s outdoors experience.

The street area along the verge was being planted by volunteers.  They were planting more flowers & herbs around a mix of fruit trees & heavily mulching the beds.  It already looks wonderful.

Even the bike parking poles, of which there are many, were attractive.  They sit on compressed clay – again, no concrete – & the bicycles can be attached to wooden poles that have two wide holes in them to thread your bike chain through.  The use of wood in Camperdown Commons is very soothing to my eye. I like that my eye wasn’t being drawn to concrete, but rather to plants & wood of various colours & hues.

The farm is being managed by Pocket City Farms who have a wonderful aim.

“Pocket City Farms is taking to Sydney’s neglected spaces, from spare plots to rooftops, in an effort to make good of that unused space – by growing fresh organic produce!”

To become a volunteer, you need to subscribe to their newsletter, which will tell you of upcoming dates & activities.  As far as I am aware, it is free to participate.  See – http://www.pocketcityfarms.com.au

Their first workshop at Camperdown Commons is happening next week & is titled, ‘Edible Gardening for Kids.’   “This workshop will provide a fun & interactive opportunity for kids to get involved with the farm & the demonstration garden, learning to plant seeds, to grow & harvest their own food & to compost their scraps.”  Pretty exciting if you ask me.

  • WHEN: Wednesday, July 6th 2016.
  • TIME: 10am – 12 noon.

I am bound to have missed some aspects of this marvelous venture, so you will need to go & experience it for yourself.  I think the whole space is wonderful.  It is great to see spaces like this repurposed into something that incorporates nature & growing things.  It’s good for all of the community to have an opportunity to get their hands dirty & learn how to grow food.  Lastly, some of the produce will be for sale at a market stall. Camperdown got really lucky.

A section of Acre.

A section of Acre.

One of the lovely displays inside the restaurant Acre.

One of the lovely displays inside the restaurant Acre.

More raised garden beds with the Hen House in the background.

More raised garden beds with the Hen House in the background.

A section of the Children's Playground.  I found this a very interesting place totally suitable to children making up their own play.

A section of the Children’s Playground. I found this a very interesting place totally suitable to children making up their own play.

The 100-metre verge is being planted with suit trees, herbs & flowers. Such a boon for the streetscape.

Volunteers were busy planting & mulching the 100-metre verge, which has been planted with fruit trees, herbs & flowers. Such a boon for the streetscape.

They have a resident Magpie who seems very happy.

They have a resident Magpie who seems very happy.  Everywhere I looked there were flowers & herbs.  A great deal of care has been taken to make this a beautiful place.  It will only get better.

 

Dead Sydney Blue gum in Tooth Lane Camperdown

Dead Sydney Blue gum in Tooth Lane Camperdown.

Marrickville Council has given notice of their intention to remove a Sydney Blue Gum (Eucalyptus saligna) in Tooth Lane Camperdown.

Council gives the following reasons for removal –

  • “The tree has died (scenecent) [sic]
  • The tree poses an unacceptable level of risk to the public and property.”

I visited this tree & it is as Council says – dead. What is incredible is that this tree had been allowed to live in the first place. Either it was left in-situ when the units were being developed or it was planted shortly afterwards. It is the only tree in this lane. It once had a significant canopy that I can only assume was enjoyed by the people who looked onto its canopy & enjoyed the shade it provided. This tree provided significant amenity for many years.

Council says they will not be planting a replacement tree “due to site restraints.”

I agree with Council that planting another tree here is unfeasible because there simply is no room.   However, with Marrickville municipality officially recognised as having one of the poorest canopies in Sydney, I would consider it a good move toward increasing our urban forest if Council planted a Sydney Blue Gum in another location where its growth will not be restrained. There are plenty of suitable places.

It seems counterproductive in these days of climate change not to use every opportunity to replace any tree lost with at least one other of comparable size & amenity. In many places the standard is to replace one lost with two to four new trees.  To lose a tree, & a big tree at that, & decide to replace with nothing is disappointing. It makes me wonder how Marrickville’s urban forest will ever achieve the 20% increase as campaigned for by the 202020 Vision.

Sydney Blue gums are valuable trees to local wildlife providing habitat & food. They also are one of the few tall tree species in the municipality, so provide green on the skyline for the community to see.  The benefits of trees have been repeatedly spoken about in this blog.  Just being able to see trees on the skyline instead of red tiled roofs offers some respite from the harshness of the inner city landscape.

I offer Broadway, Ultimo & Chippendale as nearby suburbs that have 3-4 storey street trees as a norm. Marrickville municipality has, on average, wider streetscapes & verges than those suburbs, yet our streetscapes are remarkably different.

The deadline for submissions is Friday 12th February 2016.

A very detirmined tree to live in this space for as long as it did.  When it is gone the space is perfect for a small garden to keep some beauty in this lane.  Better than weeds.

A very detirmined tree to live in this space for as long as it did. 

Part of the canopy of this Deciduous fig tree.  I think it is glorious.

Part of the canopy of this Deciduous fig tree. I think it is glorious.

Marrickville Council has, for the first time as far as I am aware, used cables & braces to stabilize a tree, rather than chop it down.

Showing the stainless steel bolt of the cabling system.

Showing the stainless steel bolt of the cabling system.

The tree is a 100-year-plus Deciduous fig (Ficus superba var henneana) that lives in the lovely Camperdown Park. It is a magnificent tree & totally worth the money & effort that has been put into retaining it.  I applaud Marrickville Council for taking this management approach.

Council’s sign below the tree says it is one of only a handful known to exist in Sydney.  

The tree has a visible crack in the base of the trunk. The trunk has been braced & has a measuring gauge that I assume will allow Council to monitor the crack to see if it is growing wider. The brace will fortify the stem & should prevent further splitting.

Showing the split in the trunk & the device that will  monitor any further splitting.

Showing the split in the trunk & the device that will monitor any further splitting.  Let’s hope the vandals leave it alone.

A number of stainless steel cables have been drilled through some larger branches & fixed with stainless steel bolts. These cables alleviate stress by supporting the heavy branches, especially during high winds.

The following is a 3-minute video explaining cabling & bracing, which is a common management intervention to save risky trees. The only difference is that with this tree, Council drilled right through the branches & attached with a stainless steel bolt, but the principles are the same.   See – http://bit.ly/1Dgl0q7

One view of the magnificent Deciduous fig tree in Camperdown Oval

One view of the magnificent Deciduous fig tree in Camperdown Oval

Another view.

Another view of this very special tree.

A number of branches have been removed to reduce the weight of the canopy & cables have been attached to branches to relieve stress on the tree.

A number of branches have been removed to reduce the weight of the canopy & cables have been attached to branches to relieve stress on the tree.

It's a massive loss to lose this huge tree.  The shear where the branch came off is around 1.8 metres.

It’s a massive loss to lose this huge tree. The shear where the branch came off is around 1.8 metres.

Marrickville Council has given notification that they intend to remove a Tallow-wood (Eucalyptus microcorys) from Peter Cotter Reserve, corner Ross Street & Salisbury Road Camperdown.

They give the following reasons for removal –

  • “Major branch failure resulting in the loss of approximately one quarter of the canopy.
  • The tree has a history of branch failure, including three branches within the last 12 months.
  • The tree poses an unacceptable level of risk to the public & property.”

Council says they will replace this tree as part of park upgrade scheduled for 2015-16 financial year.

The deadline for submissions is Monday 5th January 2015.

A closer view of the shear.

A closer view of the torn trunk.

Lovely old Poplar to be removed.  Unfortunately it is leaning.

Lovely old Poplar to be removed. Unfortunately it is leaning.

Marrickville Council has given notice of their intention to remove a Lombardy Poplar (Populus nigra var. ‘Italica’) in Camperdown Park, Camperdown.

Council gives the following reasons for removal –

  • “Tree is leaning with major rootplate lifting and signs of wind throw.
  • Tree is in a state of decline with signs of internal decay.
  • Tree poses a risk to public safety.
  • Tree is causing damage to public infrastructure.”

Council says that the replacement tree species will be determined during the Camperdown Park upgrade.

I hope the replacement is another Poplar to keep the line of this species in this location.

The deadline for submissions is Tuesday 28th October 2014.   I will not be putting in a submission.

The lean is more obvious on the other side

The lean is more obvious on the other side

Close-up

Close-up

Showing the lower section of this tree.

Showing the lower section of this tree.

Lovely streetscape work next to Camperdown Park on Mallett Street Camperdown

Lovely streetscape work next to Camperdown Park on Mallett Street Camperdown

I was in Mallett Street Camperdown recently & noticed some very nice work Marrickville Council have done either side of a pedestrian crossing next to Camperdown Park.

Both sides have verge gardens with trees, plus there is good quality planting on four traffic islands on both sides of the pedestrian crossing. There was also a line of newly planted trees beside the crossing on the verge alongside the park.

It is a stunning piece of work & adds much to the area.  It would be good if  the southern suburbs of Marrickville municipality could get similar treatment where there are opportunities.

Another view

Another view from across the road.  A row of new street trees have been planted across the road, which will add even more green to the streetscape.

Looks great.

Looks great.

The community benefit from a row of new trees beside the pedestrian crossing.   The new Street Tree Master Plan says Council will no longer plant street trees on the side of a park.

The community benefit from a row of new trees beside the pedestrian crossing. I think they are Maple trees.  The new Street Tree Master Plan says Council will no longer plant street trees on the side of a park.

The original facade in Camperdown has been retained.  The trees on the left are in Camperdown Park.

The original facade has been retained. The trees on the left are in Camperdown Park.  The trees on the right were planted as part of the development.

Attractive seating, attractive fences, plus great trees & gardens.   In there is also a swimming pool.

Attractive seating, attractive fencing, plus great trees & gardens. In there is also a swimming pool.

part of the public walkway.  Care has been taken to make this area attractive as well.

Part of the public walkway looking onto Denison Street. Care has been taken to make this area attractive as well.

Street tree planting & verge gardens were part of the development project.

Street tree planting & verge gardens were part of the development project.  I think it looks wonderful.

For quite a while there has been frequent debate on Facebook regarding the plethora of apartment developments recently built in Marrickville & Dulwich Hill, in the process of being constructed or currently in the DA process. I think it is good to see such community interest.

The majority who leave comments are not against high-rise & recognise the need for more housing, though it is my impression that there is a consensus that the Local Environment Plan should be respected in regards to height restrictions. There are varying opinions as to whether retaining facades or recreating facades is good or the all-modern concrete & glass boxes are the way to go.  Many want to facades to fit in with the streetscape & I am one of those who hold this view.

The term “affordable housing” is used often; though $500,000 plus for a one-bedroom apartment is not anywhere near what I would consider affordable.  The term is a misnomer in my opinion.

A couple of weekends ago I visited Camperdown Park.  From there I noticed a lot of new street tree planting & verge gardens, so I went over to have a look.  I found myself outside a relatively new apartment development called ‘The Gantry.’  After having a good look around & after talking to residents I came away thinking that this is the way to provide very livable housing.

While I was looking around, I kept thinking of the new developments happening & the community conversation about these developments.

The Gantry offers one, two, three & four bedroom apartments, so the complex does offer that politically hot term – “affordable housing.”  To offer a comparison, the pricing is similar to ‘The Revolution’ on Illawarra Road Marrickville, though from the whole outlook & green space provision, the two are poles apart.

‘The Gantry,’ located at 139-143 Parramatta Road, Camperdown is where the Fowler pottery warehouses & High Bay building used to be.  Marrickville is famous for Fowler Pottery, so it is wonderful to have retained this historical link while repurposing the factory.  The complex also fronts Denison & Australia Streets & is opposite Camperdown Park.

The Architects managed to keep the historic façade.  They also incorporated verge gardens & street trees, radically improving on what was a treeless & visually harsh side of the road. The shape of the buildings was interesting & quite attractive, so I am very pleased that they were retained.

This development shows that very good, personable & livable housing can be designed & that it can fit into the streetscape without looking like an ultra-modern building in a primarily Federation style area.  Of interest, there is gated underground parking for residents.

Inside is modern, while outside retained the façade that has been here since the 1850s. To me, this is important. Other big cities of the world like London, Paris & New York have retained much of their building history & I cannot see why the same cannot be done for Sydney. I can remember when the Queen Victoria building was regarded as an eyesore & there was a strong push to knock it down, just like they did to the Anthony Horden Building in Haymarket. Now the Queen Victoria building is viewed a jewel in the heart of Sydney’s CBD & we lost the gorgeous Anthony Horden Building.

I was very surprised at the amount of green space in The Gantry development. A public walkway paved with old bricks (not concrete or granite), cuts between two buildings.  Here a panel describing the history of the building is mounted on the wall.  Above are metal beams & glass that open up to the sky. Many examples of original fowler pottery have been mounted onto the wall to further provide a historical link. I am sure this building will be put on a tourist trail, if this hasn’t happened already. People can come & see without intruding on the residents who live here.

This is a very clever way to soften the visual environment.

This is a very clever way to soften the visual environment.

The walkway has long good-looking wooden benches where people can sit. There are plants everywhere.  Grasses have been used, but not as the dominant plant.  There are a wide variety of hardy plants & quite a few tall growing trees. Pot plants line corridors between buildings, so nature features everywhere.

Street trees have been planted at regular intervals on both Denison & Australia Streets.  Even the planting of the verge gardens is imaginative & attractive.   There is quite a bit to learn from their low maintenance plant choices.

There are two large garden areas that are like large pocket parks. These are perfect places to catch a bit of sun, read a book or the like.  There is also a good-sized swimming pool.   The very leafy Camperdown Park is just across the road complete with incredible moving exercise equipment available to use for free.   It’s like a mini-gym of quality that I don’t think I’ve seen in any other park in the municipality.

All the people I spoke to said they liked living there & it did not seem to be a place where people bought as a stop-gap before moving on to something better.  It is a humanistic environment with softness that nature provides.  I think the Architect who designed The Gantry did really well & three cheers to the developer who wanted to add quality housing, not just make a quick buck. This is an excellent example of what can be done when designing high-density housing.  I just wish this were the norm.

A nice place to sit while waiting for your friends to come out.  Everywhere you look there are plants & trees.

A nice place to sit while waiting for your friends to come out. Everywhere you look there are plants & new tree plantings.

The Australia Street landscaping that first caught my eye.  The Street Tree Master Plan says Council will not plant street trees opposite parks. Despite the large trees in Camperdown Park, I believe this street will look wonderful once these Poplars have grown up.

The Australia Street landscaping that first caught my eye. The Marrickville Street Tree Master Plan says Council will not plant street trees opposite parks, however, these plantings have been done as part of the development.   It looks wonderful now & will be even more lovely when these Poplars have grown up.

The historical signage inside the public walkway

The historical signage inside the public walkway. Again, look at the variety of plants.

Looking upwards.  On the wall is orginal Fowler pottery.  It looks clean, bright & very attractive to my eyes.

Looking upwards. On the wall is orginal Fowler pottery. It looks clean, bright & very attractive to my eyes.

They have chosen easy to manage, hardy & attractive plants with a tree planted in every verge garden.

They have chosen easy to manage, hardy & attractive plants with a tree planted in every verge garden.

 

In Steel Park Marrickville South you get wooden benches & chin-up poles for free-to-use exercise equipment, which is great. In Camperdown Park you get state-of-the-art equipment, also free-to-use.

In Steel Park Marrickville South you get wooden benches & chin-up poles for free-to-use exercise equipment, which is great.  In Camperdown Park you get state-of-the-art equipment, also free-to-use.  There is a vast difference.

 

Poplar to be removed.

Red dot shows the Poplar to be removed.

Bottom of the Poplar.  I thank Council for the trouble they took to use sticky tape to attach the Notification of Removal sign.

Bottom of the Poplar. I thank Council for the trouble they took to use sticky tape to attach the Notification of Removal sign.

Marrickville Council has given notice that they intend to remove two trees located inside Camperdown Oval, Camperdown.

Tree number 1: Lombardy poplar (Populus nigra ‘Italica’).

Council gives the following reasons for removal –

  • “Extensive internal decay at base.
  • Canopy dieback.
  • Unacceptable risk to public.”

They say they will replace this tree with a Lone pine (Pinus halepensis), which will be planted prior to Anzac Day 2015.

Tree number 2: Swamp Mahogany (Eucalyptus robusta).

Council gives the following reasons for removal –

  • “Basal wounding and internal decay.
  • Canopy dieback.
  • Unacceptable level of risk to public.”

They say they will replace this tree with a Forest Red Gum (Eucalyptus tereticornis) in the current 2014–2015 tree-planting program.

The deadline for submissions for both trees is Friday 27th June 2014.   I will not be putting in a submission for either tree.

Swamp mahogany to be removed

Swamp mahogany to be removed

Base of Swamp mahogany

Base of Swamp mahogany showing the decay & damage.

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