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No street trees is a feature of New Canterbury Road Dulwich Hill. The new development in view did not include street trees, though they did include concrete.

New concrete – no street trees. Is this the best this will look?

This new development in New Canterbury Road Dulwich Hill at least put in street trees. I find the power pole in the middle of the footpath odd.

We cycled up New Canterbury Road Dulwich Hill last week & were surprised at the large developments happening there.  Our area is changing fast.

One of the high-rise blocks has four Brushbox trees planted out front, though one is already dead.   Street trees of this kind will enhance the streetscape and keep the footpath area cool so I am glad they were planted.

The other high-rise building has no street trees, just a long expanse of brand new concrete.

If this is going to be the future look for New Canterbury Road, then I think it is a missed opportunity.  Inner West Council needs to insist that developers include a decent number of street trees as part of the development & dare I say, verge gardens.  There certainly is room enough for them.

When NSW Transport built the light rail stations, they did not stop at station infrastructure.  They also planted trees & other plants extensively both inside & around the light rail stations & made these places quite attractive.  It is this that I would like to see developers do when they build a new building for the area – to look at the streetscape surrounding & especially in front of their development.  What they don’t spend in concrete, they can spend on street trees & plants.   I learnt from listening to the architect for The Revolution in Marrickville that if something “green” is not mandatory, then they don’t bother to include it in the development.

More & more around Sydney I am noticing busy roads including verge gardens & it all works well.  With climate change starting to really make its impact & with three heatwaves already this year, development needs to change into something that assists the community.  Concrete does not cut it anymore.  We know too much about how great expanses of concrete is bad for us & exacerbates heat.

Brilliant awning in Waterloo. Just a small change allows the community to have tall street trees. Such a sensible idea.

I also think Council should make it mandatory to have street side building awnings to be of the kind that has cutouts to allow the canopy of a street tree to grow & gain height as is the norm all along the Princes Highway in North Sydney.  They have tall Brushbox trees growing along their business/shopping strip & all the trees have space for their canopy to grow.  It looks good & not only that, it is sensible.  I’ve also seen this in Waterloo.   Why can we not have this in our area?

 

Further down closer to Dulwich Hill shops – New Canterbury Road Dulwich Hill is barren in many places.

To end on a positive note, I very much like the new verge gardens on both sides, corner of Myra Street & New Canterbury Road Dulwich Hill. Council narrowed the road to add gardens and slow down traffic.  They have planted Callistemon ‘Little John,’ which is a fabulous plant.  It looks terrific.  

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Looking left along Gilbert's Garden

Looking left along Gilbert’s Garden

Looking right along Gilbert's Garden

Looking right along Gilbert’s Garden

A couple of weeks ago we were cycling around the area.  Waiting for a break in the traffic at the corner of Beach & Wardell Roads Dulwich Hill, I looked across & saw people working in what appeared to be a community garden in Gilbert Barry Reserve.  A quick agreement between us & off we went to say hello.  The people there gave us a lovely welcome & confirmed that this was a community garden.   We chatted & were shown around their garden, which to my eyes was a lovely thing.

The Gilbert Barry Reserve was a poorly used & uninviting space until the Inner West Council  gave it an overhaul finishing work around July 2016.  The concept plan shows they were to remove 6 trees, plant 5 new trees & add three native garden beds.

The logs from trees removed are now lying around the far garden bed providing habitat for ground creatures.   I like that Council is doing this as a norm these days, instead of feeding every tree through the wood-chipper.

Rotting logs are a part of the natural ecosystem.   Dead wood not only continues to hold carbon, it also continues to be useful to the environment.   The process of decay adds nutrients into the soil helping to grow fungi & moss amongst other plants.  Small insects & slugs & worms love this environment.  Most of us as children have picked up a log & watched the tiny creatures run from the light. I like to think of them as ‘hotels for insects & other creatures.’  Sandstone blocks have been scattered around the garden beds & these too offer a cool moist habitat for little creatures.

A picnic table setting & two other park benches have been installed.  The benches are attractive & do not have a barrier in the middle of the bench to stop people lying down, which was great to see.  I do not like defensive architecture & unfortunately, it is creeping into our locality.

A water fountain was in the plans, but I do not remember seeing one.  I think it will be the first water fountain in the old Marrickville LGA.  I think it would be wonderful for all parks to have a fountain to provide water for birds, as well as beauty for people.  You can’t have great biodiversity without access to drinking water.

Apparently, a newly planted tree in the centre of the reserve died & is yet to be replaced.

Along the back fence of the reserve a community garden has been formed.  A decent sized stretch of land has been set aside for this & lined by sandstone.  ‘Gilbert’s Garden’ was formed around 9-months ago by a group of local residents.  They have a range of vegetables & herbs growing.  Apparently, they had a good harvest last season.

The group meets every second Sunday for a couple of hours.  Not everyone comes to every meeting, but there seems to be a core group.  They are looking for new members because the more people are, the less work for everyone.  Plus, it is fun to meet new people & form new friendships.

We met three lovely members who were very welcoming to both of us.  We both knew that invitations to join the community garden were real, not just words thrown out there.

It was pleasant to be there in the late afternoon sun chatting about the benefits of growing food.  Other people were in the reserve sitting there reading, while others were watching the activity happening at the garden.  From being a drab, empty green space, Gilbert Barry Reserve is now much improved, has beauty & usefulness & most importantly, offers inclusiveness & purpose for the community.

The more these community gardens are allowed to be formed in public spaces the better in my opinion. Despite Sydney getting larger & more populated, loneliness in the community is on the rise.  Gardens like this bring people together & break down barriers.   They not only help people learn how to grow food, they foster happiness & connection.  Getting out in nature & fresh air is good for our health too.

The community garden has a Facebook group called, ‘Gilbert’s Garden.’  If you are interested in joining or would just like to help occasionally, you can contact them here – https://www.facebook.com/groups/1491955174436769/

Gilbert Barry Reserve looking towards the road  from the community garden

Gilbert Barry Reserve looking towards the road from the community garden

Part of the new garden beds & new seating

Part of the new garden beds & new seating

Note the magnificent Melaleuca street tree.  This is the result when tall growing street trees are planted on the side without powerlines.  Photo shows new park bench and new garden bed,

Note the magnificent Melaleuca street tree. This is the result when tall growing street trees are planted on the side without powerlines. Photo shows new park bench, new tree and new garden bed

Four Robinia trees to be removed on the corner of Herbert and New Canterbury Road Dulwich Hill. By my observations, this is a popular place for people.

Four Robinia trees (and perhaps one power pole) to be removed on the corner of Herbert and New Canterbury Road Dulwich Hill. By my observations, this is a popular meeting place for people who were seeking the shade on this warm winter’s day.

Inner West Council (nee Marrickville) have given notification that they intend to remove 5 x Robinia (Robinia pseudoacacia) trees outside 366 New Canterbury Road Dulwich Hill

Council gives the following reason for removal –

  • “Trees to be removed as part of an upgrade project. They are in poor condition & at the end of their useful life.”

They say the trees will be replaced with “super advanced 400L container size tree Liriodendron tulipifera installed in structural soil to provide optimal soil volumes.”

I can have a guess at what “structural soil” & “optimal soil volumes” mean, but why not write the reason in plain English so that everyone in the community can understand?  Industry jargon always isolates & alienates those not in the industry & this applies to all industries.  The target audience is the community, not other arborists & town planners.

Of importance is our urban forest will not be increasing fast when five trees are removed to be replaced with only one tree.

The Liriodendron tulipifera is a deciduous tree native to North America.  It produces green/yellow flowers in spring & yellow autumn color before the leaves are dropped.  It grows in an upright form & can reach 20-metres in 10-15 years.   Liriodendron tulipifera are planted along the Marrickville Road shopping strip.

I went to have a look & could only see four Robinia trees in this location.  One was a power pole with a streetlight, so easily mistaken I suppose. Maybe the pole will be removed as well.

I wanted to call this post ‘A lost opportunity.’

In 2015 Marrickville Council did research to garner information about the urban heat island effect & the impact of heatwaves in Dulwich Hill.  They also created a Thermal Map, which showed the hot areas in Dulwich Hill.

Not only was New Canterbury Road nominated as ‘hot spot’ by the community, but the thermal map showed that this perception was indeed correct.  The corner of Herbert Street & New Canterbury Road is right up there in terms of excessive heat at between 32.9 – 36.8 degrees – the maximum heat shown in the thermal map.

The same corner was also in the second highest area of a study of the ‘population vulnerable to heat stress.’

So knowing that this location is really hot & is in an area of population deemed vulnerable to heat stress, Council only plans to plant one tree?  Seriously!

The location at corner of Herbert Street & New Canterbury Road has an unusually large streetscape space.  It’s not often Council gets an opportunity to work in public street space that is around 5 x 20 metres.  The corner juts out in a wide swoop.  Currently it is a wide space of concrete with the four trees, one pole & two bench seats & still leaving plenty of room that is open-air concrete.

To plant only one tree is a missed opportunity for Council to create something lovely to not only beautify the streetscape, but to also lower the heat island effect here.

I had difficulty taking photos of the trees that did not include people because they kept rushing into the space to sit on the seats or to stand in the shade.  At one stage there were fifteen people under the trees.  This shows that this is a popular meeting space for the community – another reason why more than one tree should be the upgrade project’s target.

A busy café is on this corner.  People buy something from the café & take it outside.  The café itself, does not seem to get relief from the afternoon sun.  In Sydney winter really only started yesterday after a summer-like autumn that broke all previous temperature records.  It was cold today, but still hot enough outside for people to be actively seeking shade.

This idea that we need deciduous trees for the winter months belongs to the pre-climate change past. Even the shops are despairing because of record low sales of winter clothing.

In my opinion there is room for five decent sized trees speed spread out over this site, plus landscaping works that incorporate the current seating.  Anything less means that Council knows the area is hot, but is not willing to take steps to mitigate the heat & make it an attractive & useful space for the community.   Such a shame.

The deadline for submissions is Monday 1st June 2016.

Showing the corner from Herbert Street

Showing the corner from Herbert Street.  This is a large space and much good can be done with it to make it a beautiful and useful space for the community.

Showing the corner from New Canterbury Road. Again you can see how wide this section is.

Showing the corner from New Canterbury Road. Again you can see how wide this section is.

Looking behind and up New Canterbury Road. No street trees, so the opportunity for trees on the corner becomes even more visually obvious.

Looking behind and up New Canterbury Road. No street trees, so the opportunity for trees on the corner becomes even more visually obvious.

 

Dying Evergreen oak tree in Hoskins Park Dulwich Hill. Unfortunately it stands above the playground.

Dying Evergreen oak tree in Hoskins Park Dulwich Hill. Unfortunately it stands above the playground.

Showing some of the branches where you can clearly see this tree struggling to recover.

Showing some of the branches where you can clearly see this tree struggling to recover.

The lovely big trunk.

The lovely big trunk.

Marrickville Council gave notice of their intention to remove an Evergreen oak (Quercus ilex) in Hoskins Park.

They give the following reasons for removal –

  • “Tree has significant level of canopy dieback & deadwood & is in an advance state of decline.
  • The tree poses an unacceptable level of risk to the public & property.”

This is a devastating loss in my opinion.  The tree is one of the very special trees in Hoskins Park & likely would have been planted when the park was formed in 1938.  It has a beautiful shape & once had a large canopy.

Council says this tree will be “replaced with trees and understory from the Sydney turpentine-ironbark forest community as part of a combined Green Way planting initiative by 30 June.”  Unfortunately there was not a ‘Notification of Removal’ sign on the tree.

Council does not say how many replacement trees they will be planting.  They keep missing out on opportunities to declare the good work they are doing, which I do not understand.

The replacement turpentine-ironbark forest community & understorey is a good choice. This is an ‘endangered ecological community’ in the area & will support the great work re-vegetation done by the Friends of the Greenway.  Just standing beside the greenway one can hear the number & variety of birds that live in this small corridor.  It sounds great, as it should sound when there is habitat, food & water available.  More trees & understorey will only widen the area of habitat & improve  the lovely amenity of Hoskins Park.

The deadline for submissions is Friday 6th May 2016.

Last Friday I was notified by a resident that Marrickville Council had chopped down a number of street trees on Victoria Road Dulwich Hill nearest street for location reference is Nelson Street.

Sadly the trees on Victoria Street Dully are being removed without warning or consult!!   Healthy & young trees. Gone!  A lady I know that lives there, stopped them from removing the one at the front of her house by then they had removed about three or more. She was so upset!!!  She had called council & the guy wasn’t very helpful – tree team leader or something? So awful!! Apparently according to the resident, they were following a report from 2012. But that was the old trees. They were removed & replaced.
On Friday they removed the young trees that were planted as replacement!!!”

So I went to have a look today & found four stumps.  I am presuming these trees were 5-metres or less in height.  Marrickville Council chooses not to inform the community when they remove trees 5-metres or under, which I think is something that often causes anxiety, anger & distrust toward Council, as the above communication clearly shows.  Also, it gives Council carte blanch for tree removal, as the Marrickville Street Tree Inventory Report found that the average height for our street trees across the whole of Marrickville municipality is just 5.2-metres.  What’s 0.2-metres when choosing whether to inform the community or not?

What is left after the tree removal is a long stretch of nothing, but grass & the concrete footpath.  At least two families are upset about the removal of the trees here.  I hope Council plans to replace the trees this tree planning season.

What is left after 4 street trees were removed by Marrickville Council last week.

Victoria Street Dulwich Hill after 4 street trees were removed by Marrickville Council last week.  I suspect the Callistemon in the distance was the one saved by the resident.

Looking down the lane  from Albermarle Street.

Looking down the lane from Albermarle Street.  Railcorp land is on the right.

In June 2015 I went to look at the works by Marrickville Council in Kays Avenue East laneway in Dulwich Hill. The lane travels between Kays Avenue East to Albermarle Street along the railway line.

I visited again recently to see the completed works & the planting done by the community.  It looks good & is a big improvement from what was here before.

I love the curved path & the rain gardens, which have already been put to use with the recent wet weather.  We all benefit whenever these kinds of spaces are greened up.   One day I hope that this kind of environment is the norm around the inner west.

The rain garden along the laneway.

The rain garden along the laneway.

Two large rain gardens fill the space at the end of the  cul-de-sac.  A good use of a large expanse of bitumen.

Two large rain gardens fill the space at the end of the cul-de-sac — a good use of a large expanse of bitumen.  These rain gardens will help clean the stormwater before it reaches the Cooks River, as well as help lower the urban heat island effect.  Streetscape beauty & habitat is another outcome.

The yellow dots show what I believe are newly planted trees.  Good one Marrickville Council.

The yellow dots show what I believe are newly planted trees. Good one Marrickville Council.   The Illawarra Flame tree in the background is putting on quite a show.

I last wrote about Jack Shanahan Reserve in April 2014, just after the park reopened after an upgrade. See – http://bit.ly/1VbnyNK

We ended up in Jack Shanahan Reserve this afternoon while enjoying a random bicycle ride around the area.  I am pleased to say that this park is looking great & was full of children & young adults. Being a skater’s park it is very popular.

Immediately apparent was the new trees. I counted 19 of them. Some might have been planted with the upgrade last year, but I cannot remember so many new trees & feel sure that I would have mentioned them in my post.

I wrote, “A number of good-sized Pin Oaks have been planted around the picnic kiosk & also at points along the path.   These trees continue what appears to be a theme in this park.  I was pleased to see that none of the mature trees on the hill have been removed. In 12-months when the grasses have grown & the trees are larger the differences will be more apparent.”

The new trees are Eucalypts & others, but not Pin oaks. They have been planted in the lawn area alongside the railway line. They already look good & very soon their canopy will block out the passing trains, plus provide shade & habitat for wildlife.

The native grasses have grown & filled out garden beds. It all looks lush & inviting – a park one would want to visit.

Unfortunately I saw young people throwing glass bottles at three Australian White Ibis who had come to inspect the barbeque. I am not a fan of signs, but I think Council could do well to install a sign here to tell the community that these birds are native & protected by law. It may help eliminate unnecessary cruelty to wildlife that have an equal right to be in the park as people do.  A sign may also help young people educate others who do the wrong thing.

This photo was taken in April 2014. Only one tree on the left.

This photo was taken in April 2014. Only one new tree on the left.

Same area today. There are definitely more trees.

Same area today. There are definitely more trees.

The garden beds were all planted with native grasses.  I think this is looking good.

The garden beds were all planted with native grasses. I think this is looking good. Plus there is another new tree indicated by a yellow dot.

Australian native Bracelet Honey Myrtle to be replaced by ornamental Manchurian pear.

Australian native Bracelet Honey Myrtle to be replaced by ornamental Manchurian pear.

The yellow dot shows the tree to be removed.  It also shows the verge gardens and the other street trees.

The yellow dot shows the tree to be removed. It also shows the verge gardens and the other street trees.

Tree number 1:

Marrickville Council has given notification of their intention to remove a Bracelet Honey Myrtle (Melaleuca armillaris) outside 583 New Canterbury Road Dulwich Hill.

They give the following reasons for removal –

  • “Tree is in decline with significant canopy dieback.
  • Lean presents a significant obstruction and is a risk to public and property.
  • The tree is unsustainable in its current condition.”

Council says they will replace with a Manchurian Pear (Pyrus ussuriensis) as part of the 2016 Street Tree Planting Program.

The Manchurian Pear is a deciduous ornamental tree that grows to approximately 9-metres tall by 7-metres wide. Their leaves turn red in autumn & they produce small white flowers in late winter to early spring.  The tree produces inedible, greenish-yellow, globose fruit up to 3 cm in diameter.

As far as I am aware these trees have no benefit to wildlife, though perhaps the bees like the flowers.

Gardening Australia says the following about Manchurian Pear trees –

“The tree has inherent branch weaknesses, which means that it can fall apart & in a home garden that’s a considerable safety problem. The biggest problem is included bark, which is where the bark grows into the junction between the branches, and means you don’t really get good, firm attachment. The result is that the branch has simply peeled off and broken. Although good bark is produced to heal the wound, it’s still an unsightly feature and unsafe when the branch breaks.
 Another problem is a V-crotch or an acute branch structure. It’s where one branch has grown quickly and with the weight of foliage it acts like a lever and that can easily lead to a break.”  See – http://ab.co/1DBD68U

The Bracelet Honey Myrtle tree is one of those old gnarly street trees that many love.  Unfortunately this tree is in decline, though it is not dead yet.   I wonder whether a tree growing in these conditions with only whatever rainwater it could catch could respond to fertilizing, watering & mulching.

I feel regret when a lovely old tree that has received very little care over its life gets chopped down before any attempts to save it.  I consider this a big loss, as it is one of the nicest street trees along this stretch of road.

To replace this food-producing native with an ornamental Manchurian Pear that does nothing for wildlife is a shame.

Tree number 2: A Small-leafed Peppermint (Eucalyptus nicholii) outside 16 Ross Street Dulwich Hill.

Council gives the following reasons for removal –

  • “Subject tree is in decline/dying.
  • Identified for removal under Street Tree Inventory 2012.
  • Tree in its present state poses an unacceptable risk to public and property.”

Unfortunately this lovely tree is not doing well. It is the last big tree in the street that seems almost bare of street trees.

Council says they will replace it with a Jacaranda (Jacaranda mimosifolia) as part of the 2016 Street Tree Planting Program.  Another loss of a native for an ornamental tree.

The deadline for submissions for both trees is Friday 14th August 2015.

Small-leafed Peppermint to be removed.

Small-leafed Peppermint to be removed.

Lovely shaped branches.

Lovely shaped branches.

 

 

Marrickville Council has commenced work on Kays Avenue East laneway Dulwich Hill

Marrickville Council has commenced work on Kays Avenue East laneway Dulwich Hill.  I very much like the curve path.  It is a shame that Railcorp does not plant trees in the large empty patch of land next to this.

I went to have a look at the work Marrickville Council are doing at Kays Avenue East laneway in Dulwich Hill. The lane travels between Kays Avenue East to Albermarle Street along the railway line.

Council is making this into a ‘living lane’ & putting in rain gardens to reduce flooding that occurs here regularly. The rain gardens will filter the stormwater before it travels to the Cooks River.

I noticed a drain nearby had a painted stencil informing that stormwater in this location went to the Cooks River. I’d like to see these on every drain. The more of these around, the more people will get to understand that stormwater can travel kilometres before reaching the river.

The pathway design through the lane is curved, which softens the feel of the area. There is space either side of the path where Council is intending to landscape & plant new trees.

There will be a community planting day when the work is completed. If you want to participate, send an email to water@marrickville.nsw.gov.au

There will also be new parking spaces in Kays Avenue & a new cycleway linking Albermarle Street with School Parade.

I have always appreciated the planting outside the fence line of the adjoining property in the Kays Avenue East laneway, which I presume was done by a resident. Their work added beauty & now Marrickville Council’s work would be significantly adding to this.

So far the laneway works looks terrific. Once completed, I think it will be a bonus to people & wildlife.  I will post an update when the works are completed.

Looks like the beginning of a rain garden.

Looks like the beginning of a rain garden.

Lots of pipes to be installed.  Flooding much be significant

Lots of pipes to be installed. Flooding much be significant

Waiting for final removal.

Waiting for final removal.

Marrickville Council has given notice of their intention to remove a Small-Leafed Peppermint (Eucalyptus nicholii) outside 17 Eltham Street Dulwich Hill.

They give the following reasons for removal –

  • “Major branch failure during high winds resulting in approx. 40% loss of canopy leaving the tree unstable.
  • The tree in its present state poses an unacceptable level of risk to the public & property.”

Council says they will replace with a Chinese Pistachio (Pistacia chinensis) in the current 2015 Street Tree Planting Program.

The Chinese pistachio is native to China, Taiwan & the Philippines.  It is fast-growing, deciduous & puts on a red display in autumn. It reaches a height of between 6-10 metres.  Female trees produce berries that are attractive to birds.

The Queensland Government website says, – “Chinese pistachio (Pistacia chinensis) is regarded as an environmental weed in New south Wales & the ACT, & is also a potential environmental weed or “sleeper weed”  in other parts of southern Australia.”   See – http://bit.ly/190nZHG

It is beyond my understanding why Marrickville Council chooses to plant risky non-native trees when there are so many suitable Australian native trees.

The deadline for submissions is Friday 8th May 2015.

The playground at Hoskins Park is lovely & naturally shaded by the surrounding big trees.

The playground at Hoskins Park is lovely & naturally shaded by the surrounding big trees.

After a long & solid campaign by the community, Marrickville Council is proposing to classify Hoskins Park as a Heritage Item & classify Hoskins Park & surrounds as a Heritage Conservation Area.

The deadline for submissions is Thursday 18th December 2014.   See – http://bit.ly/1I6pv8I

You can watch a short video of beautiful Hoskins park here – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7CoNGNX09Vc

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