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A drowsy Pelican

It’s Spring & the Aussie backyard Bird Count is almost here.  Birdlife Australia are asking people to count all the birds they see during a 20-minute period & then log this information onto their website or via their free app.  Your information helps them assess the health of birdlife throughout Australia.

Your backyard can be the park, your real backyard, the grounds at school – anywhere & at any time of day.   You can do one count or many counts, but each area needs to be logged on a separate count.

If you fail to see any birds, they want you to log this information too, as it helps the researchers know where birds are sparse.

The Aussie backyard Bird Count asks that you count birds within one area rather than walk for 20-minutes, because this can result in a large area.  Best to target an area with a maximum 80-metre radius or an area 100-metres by 200-metres maximum.

400 birds are listed in a field guide to help you identify them.

The app & a list of FAQS can be found here – https://aussiebirdcount.org.au/faq/

The Aussie Backyard Bird Count runs from the 23 to 29 October 2017.

An extra way you can help is report any Cockatoos you see nesting, tagged & untagged to Hollows as Homes.  See – http://www.hollowsashomes.com 

 

A very happy pair of nesting Cockatoos.

White-faced Heron finds a snack in the saltwater wetlands at Tempe Reserve

A young White-faced Heron finds a snack in the saltwater wetlands at Tempe Reserve

White-faced Heron near its nest. They lay 3-4 eggs on average & can lay up to seven..

White-faced Heron near its nest. They lay 3-4 eggs on average & can lay up to seven.

The first ‘Aussie Backyard Bird Count’ is happening this month from Monday 20th to Sunday 26th October 2014.

The event is organized by Birdlife Australia & Birds in Backyards & they want as many people as possible to take part.

All you have to do is spend 20-minutes counting birds in your backyard, school, local park, beach, forest, paddock – wherever you are.

They are very happy for individuals to submit multiple checklists of 20-minutes, so you can count birds at your home & other places in your local area if you wish.

You can either enter your count through the Aussie Backyard Bird Count website at – http://aussiebirdcount.org.au

or via a free app available to download here – https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/aussie-bird-count/id917024019?ls=1&mt=8

You do not need to be an expert on birds to take part. A field guide is built into the app to help you identify birds. There is also a list of colloquial names to help you identify birds.

This is an opportunity for all of us, young & old, to get involved in this very important citizen science.  Development, loss of green space, trees & forests, as well as a changing climate has an impact on bird life.  Birds give an immediate picture of an area’s environmental health & this information can be used to help improve habitat & biodiversity.

Grey Butcher bird

Local Grey Butcher bird – the parent of the fledglings below.

Local Grey Butcher bird fledglings

Local Grey Butcher bird fledglings.  They were hard to find.

Five local Noisy Miner fledglings.

Five local Noisy Miner fledglings.

One of the first Magpie chicks to hit the grass at Mackey Park.  Dad is on the left.

One of the first Magpie chicks to hit the grass at Mackey Park. Dad is on the left.

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