You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Euston Road Alexandria’ tag.

A good example of housing development along Gardeners Road Alexandria, built right to the footpath. Balconies and major living space face the street where possibly more than 60,000 vehicles pass by every day. It is the same along many other main roads, including in the Inner West Council municipality.  

Anyone who is a regular reader of this blog will know that I post fairly often about air pollution & the link to human health.  I’ve been pleased to read the recent research about this issue & enjoy having experts agree with what are fundamental beliefs of mine.  I once again got that feeling when I read the headline of a recent article in The Conversation titled, Transport access is good for new housing, but beware the pollution.’  See – http://bit.ly/2v0tOEl

The article says that it makes sense to build housing close to public transport, but building high-rise housing along busy roads exposes those people to traffic pollution to the detriment of their health.

The former Department of Planning has a 9-year-old interim guideline titled ‘Development near rail corridors & busy roads to help development limit harmful exposure to air pollution.  

Suggested design measures include:

  • building setbacks
  • articulation or “stepping” of building façades
  • avoiding creation of street canyons; and
  • mitigation measures such as greening close to the road.”

Locally high-rise buildings are built right to the footpath, instead of building away from the footpath & putting in a line of trees to make the air quality better for residents.  The stepping back of building facades is being suggested in planning documents for the Sydenham to Bankstown Corridor in a bid to lower the impact of an eight storey building being built next to single storey houses.

“The NSW document suggests:

The location of living areas, outdoor space and bedrooms … should be as far as practicable from the major source of air pollution.”   If you look, the majority of high-rise developments have balconies that face the street & are attached to living rooms, so this suggestion is obviously not working.

The interim guideline also says, “… it is preferable if residential uses are not carried out along a busy road unless it is part of a development which includes adequate noise and air quality mitigation.  So we know that the government at all levels & developers know that the way they are developing Sydney & other major Australian cities is not good for us & will have serious negative health impacts.

Road widening from 4 lanes to 7 lanes along Euston Road in Alexandria as part of exit management from the WestConnex Motorway resulted in the removal of two rows of quite big trees. These trees did much to improve air quality for these residents & also the public who walked along this road.  Now the residents will need to adjust from the “up to less than 6,000 [vehicles] a day to more than 50,000 when WestConnex is built.”   See – http://bit.ly/2nijiSD

Just how these residents will adjust to living 1.4 metres away from more than 50,000 plus passing vehicles every day is anyone’s guess.

“…..the Sydney Motorway Corporation, RMS and contractors have canvassed the possibility of installing noise insulation, sealing wall vents and installing airconditioning units in apartments that will jut up against the seven-lane road.”  So, use your balcony at your own risk then?  Even prisoners in gaol get access to fresh air from their cells.

The Conversation article summed the issue up in a nutshell – “We are in a situation where councils can refuse approval for a well-designed, aesthetically pleasing carport in front of a building line, while people’s health is put at risk due to new housing developments along main roads being prioritised.  ….The Parramatta Road Corridor is one example of the current approach.”

Nitrogen dioxide pollution “include increases in all-cause, cardiovascular and respiratory mortality and hospital admissions for respiratory and cardiovascular disease, decreased lung function in children, and an increased risk of respiratory symptoms such as asthma, stroke & lung cancer.  If left unchecked or unevaluated, planning decisions that put new homes along busy roads are likely to undermine public health protection principles.”

 

 

click here to follow Saving Our Trees on Twitter

Archives

Categories

© Copyright

Using and copying text and photographs is not permitted without my permission.

Blog Stats

  • 509,580 hits
%d bloggers like this: