You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Gum trees. Eucalypts’ tag.

2 gorgeous Gums in Dulwich Hill

The story goes like this –

In the yard of a home owned by public housing was an 18 metre tall Grey Gum (Eucalyptus punctata) with a 14 metre wide canopy.  Next door lived Ms R in a home also owned by public housing. The tree’s branches overhung the driveway. The tree had dropped some branches over the years. Ms R had asked the Department of Housing to remove the tree & the tree was trimmed a couple of times. During a storm branches fell from the tree breaking a couple of windows.

In 2005 the Department of Housing applied to the local Council for permission to remove the tree because it was unstable.  The Council’s Arborist inspected the tree & did not approve removal because the tree was in a sound/stable condition & removal was inconsistent with the Council’s Tree management Plan.  The Arborist said he had no objection to pruning deadwood & to thin the crown by 15%, but without height reduction.

In December 2005 Ms R was hit by a branch or dead wood. She sued Council & the Department of Housing for negligence.  Her consultant Arborist thought the Council’s Arborist did “not consider the intrinsic nature of Eucalypts to unpredictably shed dead branches or live branches that have been damaged,” & that the tree “will provide an ongoing source of potential hazard,” & “despite any further remedial pruning, it will continue to pose an unacceptable & ongoing risk of hazard to the safety of people & damage to property.”

Another 2 lovely Gums in Smidmore Street Marrickville

The District Court did not award Ms R damages. She appealed. On 13th September 2010 the NSW Court of Appeal delivered judgement (Rhodes v Lake Macquarie City Council & another [2010] NSW Court of Appeal 235).

The Court noted Council’s evidence that this particular species drop deadwood, but did not think Council was negligent in its decision that the tree should stay.

The Court said Council’s Tree Management Policy “favours retention of native trees, including trees such as Grey Gums which produce deadwood & drop branches; and that substantial justification is required for consent to be given for removal of such trees.”

To find the authorities negligent “the risk of substantial damage to property or significant injury to a person would be required.”

The Court acknowledged the accident was unfortunate for Ms R, but concluded “the history of 2 broken windows, some broken tiles & 1 very minor injury to a person, over a period of about 6 years, was not such to suggest that this tree was any more dangerous than the general run of such trees.”

Gum trees in Enmore

The injury to Ms R is regrettable, but one must acknowledge the Council’s policy that encourages the maintenance of tall Eucalypts with wide canopy is of great social utility.   Also, the Court’s endorsement of policies that say trees should prevail despite some risks naturally present. This decision is significant in this era of climate change when having trees has become more important than ever.  I hope that Councils take courage from this judgement & not go about chopping trees down unless they present significant risks.

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Feasting Lorikeets

1. The Newcastle community have taken the axing of the Laman Street Figs to the Land & Environment Court today.  In their favour is the Arborist’s Report prepared by Mark Hartley.  Mr Hartley assessed the trees as not dangerous & had serious concerns with several mistakes in previous Reports supplied by Newcastle Council.  I hope the community win. You can read about the decision & the Independent Arborist Report here – https://savingourtrees.wordpress.com/2010/09/01/independent-arborist-report-for-newcastles-laman-street-figs/

2. In a great move to support Wolli Creek being established as a national park, Canterbury Council have agreed to transfer part of the Wolli Creek bushland at Earlwood to the National Parks & Wildlife Service.  The land is between Bexley Rd & Waterworth Park.  http://express.whereilive.com.au/news/story/vote-brings-planned-park-a-step-closer/

3. Large amounts of Eucalypts are dying across Australia & it is thought to be caused by Bell Miner Associated Dieback. One little bird guarding the psyllid, a sap-sucking native insect that provides food for the Bell Miner is thought to be responsible in some areas.  In New South Wales alone, up to 2.5 million hectares of forest are wasting away. Another theory published in 1968 by ecologist William Jackson of the University of Tasmania & regaining favour is that the Australian bush needs regular bushfires to survive. Interesting reading. http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg20727772.200-receding-gums-what-ails-australias-iconic-trees.html?full=true

4. Frightening results in a recent survey about climate change of local, state & federal Australian politicians conducted by the University of Queensland.  Of the 300 politicians surveyed, nearly 70% believed anthropogenic climate change was real, but “more than 40% thought a temperature rise of 4 degrees would be safe.” Scary stuff as these people are making decisions for all of us. http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2010/08/12/2980671.htm

5.  2 Fig trees were to be removed in Kensington by the City of Perth Council without community consultation. The Council said the trees were damaging the footpath & could affect fibre-optic cables. Well roads can be fixed, so can footpaths & fear that a tree may damage underground cables is a pretty poor excuse to remove the Fig trees.  I wish Councils would use floating or permeable footpaths to allow them to keep trees. These trees would far outweigh any concrete or bitumen in value & benefits to the community. It’s that old way of thinking again, rip out a tree-it’s the easiest route. The City of Perth Council will now do community consultation about these trees. http://www.inmycommunity.com.au/news-and-views/local-news/Threat-to-trees-angers-residents/7568257/

6. By contrast, Brisbane City Council ordered a redesign of the $10.2 million Perry Park upgrade to save a row of Fig trees.
A spokesman said council policy was to retain “mature, healthy trees” where possible. In QLD, trees & street landscaping is everywhere & is wonderful.
 It really looks like a different country. Loud applause from me.  http://city-news.whereilive.com.au/news/story/fig-trees-slow-upgrade-start/

7. A row of 14 old, ‘ulgy’ & ‘past their use by date’ Nicolai gum trees along Chiefly Road Lithgow will likely have been chopped down by now.  Lithgow Council said “the trees had been inappropriately pruned in past years by electricity authorities.” I’ve no doubt that this approach to Lithgow looked old & ulgly. Shame it happened in the first place. I wonder when this cycle of tree management will end.  http://www.lithgowmercury.com.au/news/local/news/general/tree-removal-an-environmental-necessity/1936892.aspx

8. A report done by the WA Environment Protection Authority said “declining rainfall & rising temperatures were taking a heavy toll on parts of the 1.2 million hectare state forest area south of Perth.” Paul Vogel, the head of the Environment Protection Authority said there was “more biodiversity per square metre in some of these forests than there is in the Amazon.” The Conservation Council, WA Forest Alliance & Wilderness Society want clearing & logging stopped immediately in affected areas. 850,000 hectares of WA state forest is available for logging, however, the current management plan is deemed severely lacking. http://www.perthnow.com.au/news/western-australia/environment-watchdog-warns-against-logging-in-west-australian-forest/story-e6frg13u-1225921967989

Grevillea flowers

On 26th June 2010 the Sydney Morning Herald published an article headlined: Why living near a road is bad for your health. A major study was done by the US Health Effects Institute who reviewed 700 worldwide health-pollution studies. They found:

  • traffic pollution within a 500-metre radius of a major thoroughfare was likely to exacerbate asthma in children
  • trigger new asthma cases across all ages
  • impair lung function in adults &
  • could cause cardiovascular illness & death

Because the results showed a clear health-risk for those living within 500 metres of a main road the National Environment Protection Council will consider the US study in a review of existing national air pollution regulations next month.

The National Environment Protection Council will be considering “whether a limit should be imposed on the concentration levels of particulate matter larger than 2.5 micrometres. Currently authorities need to adhere to limits set for particulate matter larger than 10 micrometres.”

That’s good, even if it is significantly overdue.  25 years ago a friend’s mother  told me not to rent a house in Leichhardt because it was a block away from Parramatta Road. She said the pollution will be dropping in your yard & you will be breathing it every day, especially when the wind blows towards the property. I took heed & let that house go even though the rent was low.

The Australian Federal Chamber of Automotive Industries is already trying to find loopholes saying, “the industry supported moves to minimise pollution from cars, but added that air quality was good in Australia & warned against comparisons in US studies.” Except the 700 health-pollution studies were taken world-wide, not just in the US.

A random view of the Pacific Highway, Sydney. There are just as many trees along most of its length to Hornsby.

Recently I posted on the differences between Parramatta Road & the Pacific Highway.  They are both main roads, but the differences between the two are astounding, so much so, one could believe they are in different countries, not in the same city separated by a bridge.  The Pacific Highway has large trunk tall trees along its length. Tree canopies cascade over the road & no one is in fear even though the majority appears to me to be of the Eucalypt variety.

Parramatta Road however, has very few trees along the section managed by Marrickville & Leichhardt Councils & most of this road managed by other Councils are just as treeless.  The Princes Highway also is almost devoid of trees, even though this road appears to have more obvious spaces that would allow for planting.  I would think these Councils made a decision not to plant street trees along these main thoroughfares as these roads have remained in this state for decades. https://savingourtrees.wordpress.com/2010/06/10/north-shore-versus-inner-west-main-roads/

A random view of Parramatta Road at Stanmore.

Now it is not just a matter of unsightliness (which has its own recognized impact on mental & physical health), it has been recognized as a serious health matter for the thousands of people who live within 500 metres of main roads. The pollution from Parramatta Road & the Princes Highway must be at astounding levels.  I don’t know whether anyone has measured the pollution levels along these roads, but I doubt it will be too long before a study is done on this.

All the people who live within 500 metres of these roads are having their health compromised on a daily basis when all that needs to be done is plant decent sized street trees.

A tree with a 76 cm-diameter trunk removes 70 times more pollution per year than does a tree with a 7.5 cm trunk.  This is not a big tree. Double the trunk size & you will be removing a much greater amount of particulate matter & other pollutants.  The trees along the Pacific Highway are not small thin little things. They are big trunked robust growing trees with a significant canopy.

Trees are best known for their ability to sequester & store CO2, but they also absorb other pollutants such as Ozone, Nitrogen Dioxide & Sulfur Dioxide through their leaves. They reduce air temperature ground-level ozone, which contributes to greenhouse gas creation & global warming. They also remove up to 60% of street level particulate matter such as dust, smoke, ash & the sooty bi-product from car & truck exhausts. The more trees planted, the less heat is generated & the more air pollution is removed.

Now that health effects from pollution from main roads is finally being taken seriously in Australia, it is time all main roads are made safer.  The cars & trucks are not going to go away for the foreseeable future & it doesn’t matter that engines of newer cars spew out lower levels of toxic material, it is still happening year in, year out & having a major effect on the health & lives of residents & people who work on or near main roads.  Perhaps the Health Department will help cover the cost of trees for planting. It’s a valid argument as trees will help stop thousands of people becoming ill & landing up at hospitals.

http://www.smh.com.au/national/why-living-near-a-road-is-bad-for-your-health-20100626-zavi.html

In a few short years the City of Sydney Council have made this run down area opposite the Fish Markets at Pyrmont unrecognizable. Young Hills Figs line the road on both sides softening buildings & other grey infrastructure. I think the landscaping looks fabulous & all those trees are great for the health of the people who live & work in this area. The beauty of the area will also give a favourable impression of Sydney to the many tourists who visit the markets.

glorious Fig standing sentinel on Lilyfield Road Rozelle

ABC’s Stateline has another fantastic news item with a 2.25 minute video. The NSW Housing Department has given $30 million for a tree planting program in tree-poor housing estates across Sydney. Boys Town residents will be trained in planting the semi-mature trees & caring for them for the first 12 months.  After that, it is hoped the community will take over the care for the trees.

15,000 semi-mature trees (looked to be 4-6 metre) will be planted along 150 kilometres of urban & regional arterial roads, parks & streetscapes. The emphasis is on shade trees that have significant canopies to lessen the heat, help pedestrians & improve the look of bleak areas by creating avenues of trees. The video is interesting viewing. The program is truly remarkable.  http://www.abc.net.au/news/video/2010/05/07/2893807.htm

Since April 2010 the community has been protesting development by Delfin Lend Lease at the ADI site Cranebrook. One protester said “Native wildlife gone, native bushland gone, everything is slowly disappearing in front of our eyes.” http://cumberland-courier.whereilive.com.au/news/story/adi-site-protesters-vow-fight-isn-t-over/

Canberra has lost more than 20,000 public trees over the last 7 years. The removal of a further 1719, mostly Eucalypts commenced this week.  For the first time since 2003, trees will be replaced on nature strip. Replacement of street trees stopped due to the drought.  http://www.canberratimes.com.au/news/local/news/general/tree-program-to-remove-hazards/1819743.aspx

Disturbing news for Adelaide’s trees as new rules will make it easier for councils & developers to cut down established trees, raising concerns it will lead to fewer trees in Adelaide’s suburbs. Currently trees with a trunk circumference of 2m, measured at 1m above the natural ground level, are protected as significant. The conservation group, People for Trees is concerned about the implications saying “councils should do more to preserve their trees. They are just leaving trees to just rot, then something happens & they say `we’ll just chop down the tree.” First to go is a River red Gum because fallen branches damaged a car. I ask, why not prune the dying branches before they fall? http://www.adelaidenow.com.au/news/south-australia/new-south-australian-rules-the-unkindest-cut-for-established-trees/story-e6frea83-1225858567248

However Councillors in Adelaide’s San Antonio City Council bucked the trend by voting in favor of stricter environmental ordinances, preventing developers from bulldozing trees, preserving current trees & planting trees.  http://www.kens5.com/news/More-trees-will-be-preserved-under-environmental-rules-enacted-by-SA-council-93066469.html

The NSW Minister for Climate Change & the Environment, Frank Sartor, has launched a new website to provide information on the proposed changes to River Red Gum forests, wetlands & woodlands. This is a great move. http://www.riverredgums.nsw.gov.au You can read about the launch & more about the web-site & the forests at – http://cumberland-courier.whereilive.com.au/news/story/river-red-gums-website-goes-live/

A lovely article from the University of Richmond in the USA where they are building Robins Stadium, but preserving what is thought to be the oldest tree on campus. The college employed a Tree Surgeon to supervise with digging during construction to ensure no harm came to the tree. http://www2.timesdispatch.com/rtd/sports/college/college_football/article/URFB11_20100510-223007/343604/

Casurinas near Mackey park

In NSW, there are stories every week of old & heritage trees in school playgrounds being removed for the building of new halls as part of the Federal government’s stimulus program.  Old news being November 2009, but a great example is the loss of 14 mature Box trees planted in 1956 in Lathlain Primary School Perth for construction of classrooms & car parks. There was strong protest from students & parents.

One of the mothers said 
that a spokesman for the education department turned up and said ‘these trees are going down & there is nothing you can do about it’ before walking off. Then the chainsaws started. The first comment left by Kate of Lathlain provides further details. She writes “…we & our families will be left with the legacy of having to fundraise for air conditioning.” To read about the Lathlain Primary School trees – http://www.perthnow.com.au/news/western-australia/parents-children-lose-fight-to-save-school-trees/story-e6frg15c-1225796602477 To see the photos of the trees being chopped down –http://www.perthnow.com.au/gallery-e6frg1vc-1225796570712?page=1

Lastly, for pure delight, a 2.54 sec YouTube video of David Attenborough presenting Australia’s unique Lyre Bird imitating the sounds of a camera shutter, a camera with a motor drive, a car alarm & quite horribly, the sound of chainsaws cutting down forest trees. http://bit.ly/8y7tKO

I was invited by Marrickville Greens to go to watch the magnificent Lemon Scented Gum street tree in Cambridge Street Stanmore being chopped down by Marrickville Council.  For various reasons I declined, but I know I did not want this image imprinted on my memory.  I have come to love this tree & I am distressed about its loss.  To me, it was no ordinary street tree.

Marrickville LGA has some gorgeous trees, mostly in parks, though there are also good ones that are street trees.  However, we have thousands of butchered, stumpy & not good-looking street trees all over the LGA & it is noticeable if you look.

I think many of us have become desensitised to the ugliness of our street trees because their disintegration happens over time & we just get used to seeing them in this poor condition.  Leave the LGA & you immediately notice the differences.

This magnificent street tree is gone

The Lemon Scented Gum in Cambridge Street Stanmore was one of the better-looking street trees in the whole LGA & this is not an exaggeration.  Do I think this because I like Gums?  Yes & no.  I do like Gum trees, but I also like most other trees.  I am an all-round tree lover though I admit to preferring tall stature trees & especially trees which flower & provide food for insects, birds & animals.

I think it is necessary in an urban environment to think about wildlife when choosing trees to plant.  I also think we have a duty to provide food for these creatures who are losing more & more food resources every year.  If you don’t believe me, put out a birdbath in a safe place in your garden & watch how long it takes for birds to arrive.  They are short of water as well.  When we built a fishpond, the rare frogs of the area arrived within 2 days & there wasn’t other ponds around.  Where did they come from, we wondered.  If you plant flowering trees & shrubs that feed birds, they will come in droves & the air will be filled with birdcalls.

So for a tree of this magnitude to be cut down seems ridiculous to me.  The tree provided refuge for both wildlife & humans because it was a flowering native tree & its canopy significantly cooled the air in the street.  This is not a feeling I am used to when I walk the streets of my local area.  Mostly I cannot walk during the day because the streets are so hot with the heat reflected by the road & concrete.  I believe that as temperatures rise due to global warming, the heat island effect is going to get worse & we are going to bake.  City of Sydney Council recognises this & intends to plant 10,000 more trees in the CBD this year to counteract the heat.

I am aware the residents who wanted the tree removed said it was causing cracking to their house & Council felt hamstrung because of the potential of litigation.  However, because we do not have a Significant Tree Register, our public trees are vulnerable.  Cracking to houses can always be repaired & it is something we should expect when we live in 100 year old houses, which are built on clay soils & with poor quality mortar.  In fact, even renovated houses in the Inner West need regular work as they are always deteriorating.  It comes with the territory. That’s why many people prefer to live in modern units or project homes that are built on cement slabs.  As a norm, tree roots are not strong enough to lift a concrete slab.

Ordinary street in Chatswood with multiple large street trees- a very different outlook to our LGA

When we respect trees & fully appreciate their positive impact on our lives &  vital role in our civilization’s existence, if atmospheric levels of CO2 continue to rise as expected, then we will do everything we can to keep our mature trees that sequester large amounts of CO2.

The removal of this tree affects the whole community, not just the residents of Cambridge Street.  First is it one tree, then another tree & so on.  Before we know it, the whole streetscape is changed & not for the better.  It took 40 years for that tree to grow a 2.5 metre girth & it had at least another 60 years of life left in it.  Eucalypts often live 100 years or more.  All it took was 4 ½ hours for it to be gone.

The Marrickville Greens tried to get a stay of execution to try other methods to repair the cracking & fix the problem at ground level. The Labor & Independent Councillors had to power to grant this so that amelioration could be tried to give the tree a chance to be saved.  I would have conceded defeat if all avenues had been tried & agreed the tree needed be removed, but these avenues weren’t given a chance.   I am sure the Greens feel the same as I do.  This tree was also worth a lot of money to the community & especially to Cambridge Street.  Better to sell a house before a tree is cut down than after.

Our tree assets get voted out because of concrete, their particular species, because they are old, because, because, because.  I have not yet seen tree saving strategies voted in during council meetings, only the opposite.  Trees are seen as a nuisance & a liability.  The reality is: not having trees is a liability.

I will work with Labor & the Independents as well as the Greens if they are pro-trees & the greening of Marrickville LGA.  However, since I have started, I have noticed that support for my vision comes from the Greens & not from Labor or the Independents.  To be fair, Labor did reverse their decision over the Mackey Park Figs, but not until after a community protest of 300 people & an even larger petition.

Once again, regarding the Cambridge Street tree, the Greens voted to keep the tree.  Once again, the vote to remove the tree comes from the other counsellors.  Is it a pattern? Saving Our Trees hasn’t been alive long enough to be able to answer this question.

Frankly I was shocked when I read on the Greens website that:  Independent Councillor Dimitrios Thanos recently emailed Councillors & staff saying: “I’ll grab my chainsaw & meet the staff down there on the appointed day.” I just know he & I are not on the same page when it comes to trees.

Getting back to my intro, I didn’t want to go & watch the ‘Elle McPherson of trees’ be chopped down, but the Marrickville Greens did witness this.  You can read their posts about this tree –http://marrickvillegreens.wordpress.com/2010/01/14/risk-averse-council-condemns-stanmore’s-biggest-eucalypt-to-the-chainsaw/ & you can also view 2 photos taken today by the Greens at – http://yfrog.com/37y6 & http://yfrog.com/1ehcezj &

http://marrickvillegreens.wordpress.com/2010/01/20/stanmores-largest-gum-tree-turned-into-woodchip/

The Cambridge Street Stanmore Lemon Scented Gum tree is going to be chopped down soon.  I feel very sad about this.  During the Council meeting to decide the fate of this tree, the people who wanted this tree removed spoke about a large branch that fell on the street needing 2 people to carry it away.  The danger the tree posed from falling branches would have been one of the major factors why their request was granted.

Gum street tree in Petersham - 2 Currawongs have a nest in this tree

Gums trees do drop dead branches as a normal feature of their species.  Unfortunately, I think this is the reason why Marrickville Council appears not to not regard Eucalypts favourably.  Then include the fact that they grow tall & have a significant canopy.  In comparison to the usual street trees Council plants, Eucalypts are an anomaly.  I would guess the Gums are left over from the 1970s & before.

Suburbs like Petersham which have a lot of Eucalypts as street trees look fabulous as a result.  Everyone I have spoken to in this area always mentions the trees, most saying they were a major reason why they chose to buy in Petersham.  However, the Cambridge Street issue is likely to repeat itself for two reasons unless these are managed.

Firstly, building movement that causes cracking.  The Inner West is mostly clay soils & when there is drought (we have had a long one which is still continuing) the clay soils shrink. This results in movement of buildings & cracks to the walls, porches & paths, especially as most of the housing is 100 years old & the mortar used then was of very poor quality.

Roots of mature trees would have stopped growing years, perhaps decades ago. Often the tree has nothing to do with movement.  Arborists constantly have differing opinions about the impact of tree roots on house foundations.  Personally, I think it is too easy to blame the tree.

This Gum street tree in Brighton St Petersham deserves a medal for surviving pruning by Energy Australia for power lines

Even buildings that do not have a street tree out front can suffer from movement & cracking, especially during drought.  If your property is built on clay soil, removing most or all the trees on or around your property is unlikely to prevent further house movement.  It is a fact of life in the Inner West.

To minimize cracking to your house during drought, you need to water thoroughly along the exterior walls on a regular basis.  If you keep the soil moist, the clay will not shrink & your foundations are less likely to move.  Many people have concreted their yards, so they will definitely have house movement & cracking, drought or no drought.  If you already have cracking, you can assist by watering around the building to get the moisture back into the soil.  Our front door, which had started sticking, returned to normal 2 months after I recommenced watering our front garden.  I have written more fully about clay soils in the following post –

https://savingourtrees.wordpress.com/2009/12/11/11th-december-09-much-ado-about-clay-soils/

Managing dry clay soils does take time & patience.

Secondly, Eucalypts develop dead branches, which they shed as a normal feature of their development.  This does not make the species dangerous.  The process of the branch dying off until it eventually drops is not a quick one.  I have been watching trees with dead branches for 12 months now.  (It’s been one of my ‘must do posts’ which hasn’t happened until now.)  However, Gums are called ‘widow makers’ for a reason. A falling branch can kill a person if they drop on their head, but then again, so can most things that drop from a height.  I was young when I first heard the term ‘widow maker’ & I remember being told the following with much laughter:

The tree branch is dying over many months, sometimes years.  The wife asks the husband to do something about it.  Time moves on.  She nags & nags, but he watches footy & says he will prune the branch later.  Then, one day when he is mowing or something, the dirty big branch falls on his head & the wife is left a widow. The moral of the story is that men should do what their wife asks when she asks it to be done, husbands are lazy & her nagging is warranted.

Maybe you had to be there & times have changed.  The story made a big impact on me because ever since I have a keen eye to notice these branches.

This tree cnr Illawarra & Addison Rds has multiple dead branches. 3 other Gums further down towards Marrickville Rd also have dead branches

Whether or not Council should be responsible for checking trees for dying branches is not something I have an opinion about.  However, I do think we see the street trees in our neighbourhood almost daily & if we notice a tree branch is dying, a quick call or e-mail to Council should have the branch pruned before it becomes a problem & drops.

If we leave it until the branch drops, Council is likely to say the tree is dangerous & needs to be removed.  Then the community suffers another loss of a tree & eventually we lose all remaining Eucalypts & other tall trees.  Our suburbs suffer as a result because we lose the beauty that tall trees offer.  We also lose out on property values because great street trees have a surprising positive impact on local property values.

The street trees near our homes, especially the large ones, remove pollution & particulate matter which causes breathing problems.  They collect CO2 & emit oxygen making the air cleaner & cooler.  They lower temperature which helps lower our power bills, they slow down traffic, make the footpaths safer for pedestrians & generally make people feel happier.  I have written more about the value of trees in the page 100 Tree Facts, which can be located on the left hand column of this site near the top.

Lastly, if Sydney’s North Shore can have hundreds of thousands of Eucalypts as street trees, why can’t Marrickville LGA?  Let’s look after & keep the ones we have left.  They are necessary for our wildlife.

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