You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Public tree removal in Marrickville’ tag.

The tree for removal has a blue sign on the trunk.  It is unaffected by power lines.

The Inner West Council has given notice of their intention to remove a Spotted gum (Corymbia maculata) outside 7 Hilltop Avenue Marrickville dated 7 October 2017.

They give the following reasons –

  • “The tree is structurally compromised & has multiple trunk defects. These defects will increase size as the tree matures & further impact the sustainability of the tree.
  • The tree in its current state presents an unacceptable risk to the public & property.”

The trunk defeats are easy to see.  It is a shame that this tree needs to be removed.

Council says they will replace with 2 x advanced-sized Coastal Banksias (banksia integrifolia), but not when they will do this.

Replacing two for one tree is great & I thank Council for this.  Small changes like this will build on our urban forest.

Coastal Banksia is native to the east coast of Australia.  It will reach heights between 4-15 metres & produces flowers from late summer to winter.  It is a food source for nectar-eating birds, seed-eating birds, insects & possums.

No deadline for submissions was given, but up to now it has always been 3-weeks from notification.  If you have something to say contact the Tree Manager.

Showing the “trunk defects.”

 

Marrickville Golf Course

Inner West Council has given notice that they intend to remove & work on trees located in Marrickville Golf Course.

Council says it plans to do the following –

  • “Tree removal– includes the removal of several dead trees or trees present significant defects and/or structural issues.
  • The creation of habitat trees– where trees are reduced down to safe limbs and boxes and hollows are created for use by native fauna.
  • Tree pruning– to remove defective or dead branches to reduce risk.”

Council do not give the location or number of trees to be removed.  We should be told about each individual tree & why they must be removed.

Nor do they give the number & location of trees they intend to prune or those they intend to make into Habitat Trees.    Council goes on to say that –

“All trees to be removed will be replaced (and more) as part of a planting program to be developed in collaboration with Council, Marrickville Golf Course and the community.”

Again, Council does not tell the community how many new trees will be planted or what species.

This is not something I understand.  I think it is in Council’s interest to tell the community how many trees they will plant because this is positive information that makes people who care about the local environment happy.  If Council had informed the community that they planned to plant 15 new native trees for example, everyone would feel happy about it, which is good for Council.

It is called transparency.  It is their duty.  Open & full communication is the only thing that instills trust in the community for what its government does.   You can’t have words about believing in open government & consultation, but fail to inform your community.

On a positive note, I think it is wonderful that more habitat trees are being created, especially in this important biodiversity corridor along the Cooks River.   I also think it is great that more trees will be planted.  The golf course has plenty of room for more trees.

All that is left is three orange safety cones.

All that is left is three orange safety cones.

From my memory three Lombardy poplar trees were planted at the front of the Revolution apartments on Illawarra Road Marrickville around 2 – 2.5 years ago, shortly after the development was completed.  The trees were growing well.  This species is fast growing, so they were noticeable on the streetscape.

Sometime in the last week all three trees were removed & replaced by orange safety cones.  I have read reports that men with a truck removed the trees, so the trees were not removed by an opportunistic vandal.

Who knows why the trees were removed or even who removed them?  There is no Notification of Removal on Inner West Councils website.   Makes me sigh.

Black Tea-Tree outside 21 William Street Marrickville

Black Tea-Tree outside 21 William Street Marrickville

Showing the split

Showing the split

Street side

Street side

Marrickville Council has given notice of their intention to remove the following trees in Marrickville.

Tree number 1:

One Black Tea-Tree (Melaleuca bracteata) outside 21 William Street Marrickville.

Council gives the following reasons for removal –

  • “Active split at junction of co-dominant stem.
  • The tree poses a risk to property and to the public.”.

Council say they will replace this tree during the 2015 planting season with the “species to be determined by Street Tree Master Plan.”

I looked up the Street Tree Master Plan & Williams Street is part of the Newington Precinct.  Trees planned for this street are Chinese Elm (Ulmus parvifolia ‘Tod’) opposite wires & Weeping Bottlebrush (Callistemon viminalis) under wires.   This tree is under powerlines, so it will be replaced with a Weeping Bottlebrush, a lovely tree that attracts lots of birds who feed on the flower nectar.

Tree Number 2:

One Bottlebrush (Callistemon viminalis) outside 13 Wharf Street Marrickville.

Council gives the following reasons for removal –

  • “Tree has significant mechanical damage.
  • Tree is in a state of decline.
  • Tree poses a risk to public safety.”

Council says the replacement species “will be determined by Street Tree Master Plan 2014,” but not when they will plant the tree.

I looked up the Street Tree Master Plan & Wharf Street is part of the Marrickville South Precinct. Weeping Bottlebrush (Callistemon viminalis) are planned for this street.

No wonder this tree is to be removed.  Pruning for powerlines has removed one side of the tree & at least two other main branches.

The deadline for submissions for both trees is Tuesday 28th October 2014.  I will not be putting in a submission for either tree.

Pruning for powerlines has left a lopsided tree. Pruning for powerlines has left a lopsided tree.   Pruning for powerlines has left a lopsided tree.

Pruning for powerlines has left a lopsided tree.  The red semi-circle indicated the tree to be removed.

Large branch removed

Large branch removed

More pruning indicated by the yellow lines

More pruning indicated by the yellow lines.  The top was also a large branch.

It appears that one of these trees in Stanley Street is up for removal.

It appears that one of these trees in Stanley Street is up for removal.

Marrickville Council has given notice of their intention to remove a Narrow-leafed Peppermint (Eucalyptus nichollii) opposite 160–164 Livingstone Road Marrickville.

Council gives the following reasons for removal –

  • “Tree is causing significant damage to public infrastructure.
  • Tree is in a state of decline with extensive internal decay and damage from termites.
  • Tree poses a risk to public safety.”

Council says they will replace with a Red Ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica), but not when they will do this.

Red ash is native to eastern & central North America. This tree is deciduous & has conical upright growth to 15-metres. The dark green leaves turn a deep bronze in autumn.  Although hardy, it is not a long-lived tree.

Opposite 160–164 Livingstone Road are Watergums, so I am pretty sure Council is referring to one of the two trees in Stanley Street. The tree to be removed does not have a Notification of Removal sign on it.

The deadline for any submissions is tomorrow, Friday 10th October 2014.

Marrickville Council's map of tree removal & other works at Mahoney Reserve.  Click for a larger image.

Marrickville Council’s map of tree removal & other works at Mahoney Reserve. Click for a larger image.

These six Poplars are to be removed.  It's autumn so they are not looking their best after losing most of their leaves.

These six Poplars are to be removed. It’s autumn so they are not looking their best after losing most of their leaves.  They are much taller than the other trees.

Marrickville Council has given notice that they intend to remove an unspecified number of trees from Mahoney Reserve on the river at Marrickville South. I counted 23 trees to be removed, however, I could have missed a tree or two because the only information Council provided is orange dots on a downloadable map.

None of the trees in the park have Notification of Removal signs on them, so it is highly likely that most of the community will not be aware of the tree removal until after it happens.

If 23 trees is correct, then Council is planting only 8 trees to replace this loss. I don’t know how our urban forest will ever expand given this negative ratio of removal & replacement.  This park has plenty of room for more trees.

I am not surprised that so many trees are to be removed. I first wrote about the trees of Mahoney Reserve back in January 2011. See – http://bit.ly/1cOo9B6. Even then I could tell that the trees in this park were in trouble. Evidence of boring insects was visible for a phenomenal number of trees.

I wrote, One by one we looked at the trees along the Wharf Road side of Mahoney Reserve. It was difficult to find a tree that wasn’t showing borer holes & rot.  Many had ant infestations as well.”

This tree & another will be pruned to install stag ferns

This tree & another will be pruned to install stag ferns

The Marrickville section of the Cooks River is notable because someone in Council had the foresight to plant Poplars around 40-45 years ago. I think the trees are Populus deltoids (Cottonwood), but don’t quote me.  These trees are well suited to riparian zones & although not native, provide food & habitat for a wide range of wildlife. Their roots prevent bank erosion & clean contaminated soil, groundwater & stormwater.  They are great for windbreaks too, making them a sensible choice along the river, which can get very windy.

The Poplar trees along the Cooks River in Marrickville are much-loved by the community because of their significant beauty, their seasonal interaction with the environment & their sheer size. We really do not have many trees around with huge girths & of such height.

Their leaves also sound fabulous when there is a breeze & provide a great crunch under foot when they have fallen.  They also provide a wonderful dappled shade in Steel Park, allowing people to sit almost anywhere out of the sun, instead of huddling near a tree trunk.  These are also landmark trees, as they are visible from many areas on both sides of the river.

Six mature Poplars were removed from Mahoney Reserve in late 2010.  I was told it was because they died.  I suspect their death was due to boring insects, as there was ample evidence of attack on their trunks.  Council chopped back their branches & left the trunks in situ for habitat, but later they were deemed dangerous & removed in 2012.  These six trees were part of an impressive avenue of 21 Poplars in Mahoney Reserve. They were approximately 22-26 metres tall.

In this round of tree removal, six more mature Poplars are to be removed.  This will leave only six Poplars along the river & three along Illawarra Road side of the park of the original 21 trees.

Marrickville Council’s Recreation Study indicated that they would like to install synthetic turf in Mahoney Reserve.  My bet is the annual leaf drop of these trees will not be appreciated, so I expect these other trees will be removed in the coming years & as with the current Poplars, will not be replaced with Poplars.  This is a shame in my opinion.

The eight replacement trees to be planted are –

  • 1 x Lillypilly (Syzygium smithii formerly Acmena smithii)
  • 1 x Bangalay (Eucalyptus botryoides)
  • 1 x Red Mahogany (Eucalyptus resinifera)
  • 1 x Swamp Mahogany (Eucalyptus robusta)
  • 1 x Sydney blue gum (Eucalyptus saligna)
  • 1 x Forest red gum (Eucalyptus tereticornis)
  • 1 x Snow in Summer (Melaleuca linariifolia)
  • 1 x Prickly paperbark (Melaleuca styphelioides).  These seven species will be planted in a line where the current Poplar trees are.  Gaps will be left where the other trees are removed.
  • 1 x Moreton Bay fig (Ficus macrophylla) – to be planted at the corner of Wharf & Illawarra Roads. I am pleased that this will be a feature tree. One day it should look wonderful.

Two mature trees near the toilet block on Wharf Road will be pruned to install stag ferns. Around 75 other trees will have “canopy maintenance pruning.”  They need it.

I am glad Marrickville Council is doing work for the trees in this park, but feel sad that the Poplars will not be replaced.  In my opinion, these trees have many positive benefits & are iconic to the river at Marrickville.  There is plenty of room to plant the other eight trees, as well as replace the Poplars. There is so much visual change happening in Marrickville. It would be nice to have something beautiful offer continuity.

I did find a microbat box high in a tree, which was nice.

You can access the map of works here – https://www.marrickville.nsw.gov.au/Global/Environment/In%20your%20community/Tree%20management/H%20J%20Mahony%20Reserve_Mahoney%20Reserve%20Tree%20Management%20Plan.pdf

Submissions are due by Friday 30th May 2014.

Lastly, I have tried to put the photos of the trees to be removed in an anti-clockwise order around the park starting at the left of the clubhouse & finishing near the bus stop on Illawarra Road.  Two of the trees to be rmeoved are missing from the photos.

Small sick tree to go.

Small sick tree to go.

The red dot marks tree to be removed.

The red dot marks tree to be removed.

I thik it is this tree to be removed.

I think it is this tree to be removed.

A big one

A big one

Another

Another

Beside the golf course

Beside the golf course

Shame about this tree.

Shame about this tree.

I think it is these two

I think it is these two

Five of the six Poplars to go.

Five of the six Poplars to go.

Such a small shrubby tree. It looks like it has regrown after being chopped down.  I personally would wait until the other grew before removal because it offers refuge for small birds & spaces for animals & lizards at ground level.

Such a small shrubby tree. It looks like it has regrown after being chopped down. I personally would wait until the other grew before removal because it offers refuge for small birds & spaces for animals & lizards at ground level.

On the side side of the park to be removed

On the river side of the park

Another shrubby tree that I would leave until the others have grown.

Another shrubby tree that I would leave until the others have grown.  It offers refuge for birds.

I think it is this tree

I think it is this tree to be removed.

 

Such a shame as it has vigorous growth & is covered in fruit.

Such a shame as it has vigorous growth & is covered in fruit.

Marrickville Council has given notice that they intend to remove a Port Jackson Fig (Ficus rubiginosa) inside Enmore Park at Victoria Road frontage.

Council gives the following reasons for removal –

  • “Tree has extensive internal decay.
  • Subsidence split to a major limb.
  • Tree failed a Resistograph test (over 70% internal decay)
  • Two independent Arborist reports recommend removal.
  • Tree poses a risk to public safety.
  • High target area.”

Council says they will replace with another Port Jackson Fig, but not when they will do this.

This tree was on the original list for removal, but Council decided to investigate to see if it was suitable for bracing.  Then the decay was discovered.

The deadline for submissions is Friday 14th March 2014.   I will not be putting in a submission.

closer look

closer look

It feels quite empty in this section of Jarvie Park now.  The child gives an idea of the size of the trunk.

It feels quite empty in this section of Jarvie Park now. The child gives an idea of the size of the trunk.

Marrickville Coucil has given ‘post notification’ emergency tree removal of a Port Jackson Fig (Ficus rubiginosa) at Jarvie Park Marrickville for the following reasons –

  • “The tree had a major branch (approx 40% of tree canopy) failure during a high wind event.
  • The remaining tree was structurally unsound & not viable for retention.”

Council says they will replace with an 800L Moreton Bay Fig  (Ficus macrophylla) in during 2013 planting season.

What a shame.  This was a seriously beautiful tree & its loss has left a big hole in the park.  I am glad that Council is replacing with another Fig tree of an advanced size.  May the new Fig tree go on to live a very long incident-free life.

The stump - it is a big one.

The stump – it is a big one.

Marrickville Council has given notice of the following emergency tree removals.

Six dead Poplars were left in Mahoney Reserve to develop holes as habitat for wildlife.

Six dead Poplars were left in Mahoney Reserve to develop holes as habitat for wildlife.

Tree 1:  Small leaf lilly pilly (Acmena smithii) outside 265-273 Illawarra Road Marrickville.

Council gave the following reasons for removal –

  • Damaged due to strong winds.
  • Failed codominant stem union resulted in a shear split down the centre of trunk.
  • The subject tree presented an unacceptable risk to the public & property.

Council says they intend to replace this street tree during the 2013 planting season.

Trees 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7:  6 x Cottonwood (Populus deltoids) at Mahoney Reserve Marrickville South.

Council gave the following reasons for removal –

  • Dead trees with extensive basal decay & borer damage.
  • The trees presented an unacceptable risk to public safety.

Council says they intend to replace during 2013 Planting Season.  The removal of these trees is disappointing as they were intentionally left to provide habitat for wildlife.

Mountains of woodchip are all that remain of these majestic trees in Mahoney Reserve.

Mountains of woodchip are all that remain of these once majestic trees in Mahoney Reserve.

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