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The new area.  This and the photo below shows the whole site.

Sometime during winter the Inner West Council – Marrickville cleared the grass below & around their latest ‘habitat trees’ in Mackey Park.  The cordoned off area lay there for a few weeks until it was covered with wood chip.  About a fortnight ago I noticed that the area had been planted with small plants like native grasses.   The more areas that support wildlife the better in my opinion.

Hopefully it fills out.

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The tree for removal has a blue sign on the trunk.  It is unaffected by power lines.

The Inner West Council has given notice of their intention to remove a Spotted gum (Corymbia maculata) outside 7 Hilltop Avenue Marrickville dated 7 October 2017.

They give the following reasons –

  • “The tree is structurally compromised & has multiple trunk defects. These defects will increase size as the tree matures & further impact the sustainability of the tree.
  • The tree in its current state presents an unacceptable risk to the public & property.”

The trunk defeats are easy to see.  It is a shame that this tree needs to be removed.

Council says they will replace with 2 x advanced-sized Coastal Banksias (banksia integrifolia), but not when they will do this.

Replacing two for one tree is great & I thank Council for this.  Small changes like this will build on our urban forest.

Coastal Banksia is native to the east coast of Australia.  It will reach heights between 4-15 metres & produces flowers from late summer to winter.  It is a food source for nectar-eating birds, seed-eating birds, insects & possums.

No deadline for submissions was given, but up to now it has always been 3-weeks from notification.  If you have something to say contact the Tree Manager.

Showing the “trunk defects.”

 

BEFORE: Google street view of the tree that was removed. This image is a few years old, perhaps a decade. The tree was much taller, with a much larger trunk & a bigger canopy.

AFTER:  Photo taken today after all branches were removed. The top of the trunk is higher than I can reach.

What is wrong with people?   Late last week a mature Bottlebrush tree outside 89 Warren Road was unceremoniously chopped to nothing, but a trunk.   It looks awful.  It is one less tree in this street.  It also is a waste of rate-payers’ money & a waste of Council’s work.

This vandalism has robbed the community of all the benefits this tree was providing.  It was more than 20-years-old.   Local people have contacted me about this tree & they feel furious that the tree has been destroyed & they want the Inner West Council to replace it as fast as possible.

Some facts about the value of trees to help any vandal who may happen to read this realise that their actions actually have a bigger negative impact than just losing a tree –

  • A good street tree can add 30% to your property value.
  • A street full of good leafy street trees is a real estate agent’s pleasure because all houses will sell for more than the same kind of house in the same kind of condition in a street that does not have street trees, or has poor quality street trees.
  • Street trees provide a buffer from traffic & collect particulate matter pollution from passing vehicles.  Without this buffer, that particulate matter pollution is much more likely to reach your lungs.
  • Particulate matter causes lung irritation, respiratory illnesses & impairs airway function. It also can cause irregular heartbeat, heart attacks & premature death in people with heart or lung disease.  It also collects on buildings.
  • The shade of a tree can reduce air temperature by 1 – 8 degrees Celsius.
  • The canopy acts as a buffer for wind & can reduce wind speed by 10%.
  • A street tree can save up to $400 on your annual power bill.
  • Trees are nature’s air conditioners & they cool down surface heat & lower the urban heat island effect.
  • Trees also sequester CO2 & produce oxygen.
  • They help capture stormwater.
  • Trees provide habitat & food for wildlife.
  • People are happier when in leafy green streets. Since we have very little green space (the former Marrickville LGA had the least green space in Australia), the streets and the street trees are our green space, aside from parks.
  • People are happier & have less depression when able to be around trees.

So well done.  This is a busy street with both pedestrians & vehicle movement.  It’s hot walking around there.  The locals are angry with you.  You did not enrich the streetscape.  Instead, you destroyed part of it & this is a terrible way to treat both the tree & the community to whom that tree belonged.

What is left.

The palm trunk above the Marrickville Golf Course Club House is the new home of a pair of Sulphur-crested Cockatoos.  The white dot is a cockatoo.

Gone!

On 19th August 2017, I posted about a palm tree trunk behind the Club House at Marrickville Golf Course that was being used as a nesting hollow by a pair of Cockatoos.   See – http://bit.ly/2wboFtx

I rode past today & it was gone.

National Tree Day site in Steel Park Marrickville South. All that is wood chip is the new area that was planted today. It joins last year’s site to create a continuous corridor along the river in this area.

This afternoon we went down to Steel Park Marrickville South to have a look at Inner West Council’s National Tree Day site.  I had looked at the site earlier & noticed just how big the area to be planted is in comparison to previous years.  Inner West Council decided to convert a significant area into habitat for wildlife at this location &  I think this is excellent.

Three new trees were planted –

  • Two Swamp mahoganies (Eucalyptus robusta), an Australian native that can reach up to 30-metres in height. It can live for at least 200-years.  I find exciting to have such long-lived trees planted in a park where it has a decent opportunity to reach such an age.  Fingers crossed anyway.   It flowers well in spring & summer & offers food for birds & other nectar-eating wildlife.  Christmas beetles like to eat the leaves, so hopefully we will see some of these at Steel Park.
  • One Prickly-leaved paperbark (Melaleuca styphelioides) – also an Australian native. This is a medium-sized tree that reaches between 5-11 metres in height.   It has a dense, rounded canopy with drooping branchlets & produces cream or white cylindrical bottlebrush-like flowers in summer.  It likes to grow along stream banks or other moist situations, so good for this location.

Everyone who planted today have done the whole community a service & I thank them.   It is excellent to see more places along the river that are for wildlife only & I personally, think that looking at bushy areas is far more interesting than great expanses of lawn.  The birds will come, which adds a further layer of enjoyment to users of the park.

A closer look. Each dark patch is where something was planted.

The 3 trees that were planted.  Swamp mahogany in the foreground, the Melaleuca in the middle and another Swamp mahogany in the background.  

The Cooks River at the Cooks River Foreshore Marrickville today.

We like to think of ourselves as being environmentally green in Marrickville, but this is going too far.  I have no idea what is causing the water to be this colour & have reported to Sydney Water, Inner West Council & local group, the Cooks River Valley Association.  Maybe it is n early stage of blue-green algae.  I don’t know, but it sure doesn’t look right.

Marrickville Golf Course

Inner West Council has given notice that they intend to remove & work on trees located in Marrickville Golf Course.

Council says it plans to do the following –

  • “Tree removal– includes the removal of several dead trees or trees present significant defects and/or structural issues.
  • The creation of habitat trees– where trees are reduced down to safe limbs and boxes and hollows are created for use by native fauna.
  • Tree pruning– to remove defective or dead branches to reduce risk.”

Council do not give the location or number of trees to be removed.  We should be told about each individual tree & why they must be removed.

Nor do they give the number & location of trees they intend to prune or those they intend to make into Habitat Trees.    Council goes on to say that –

“All trees to be removed will be replaced (and more) as part of a planting program to be developed in collaboration with Council, Marrickville Golf Course and the community.”

Again, Council does not tell the community how many new trees will be planted or what species.

This is not something I understand.  I think it is in Council’s interest to tell the community how many trees they will plant because this is positive information that makes people who care about the local environment happy.  If Council had informed the community that they planned to plant 15 new native trees for example, everyone would feel happy about it, which is good for Council.

It is called transparency.  It is their duty.  Open & full communication is the only thing that instills trust in the community for what its government does.   You can’t have words about believing in open government & consultation, but fail to inform your community.

On a positive note, I think it is wonderful that more habitat trees are being created, especially in this important biodiversity corridor along the Cooks River.   I also think it is great that more trees will be planted.  The golf course has plenty of room for more trees.

Community compost bin in Chippendale.  Photo taken 2013.

Good news for World Environment Day.   The Inner West Council is trialling community compost huts & they say they are the first council to do so in Australia.   In 2013 I posted about community compost bins that are scattered around the streets of Chippendale.  It must be huts versus bins that make Inner West Council’s initiative unique.   Whatever the reason, I think community composting is a great idea however it is delivered.

Local residents who live within walking distance to the compost huts & are signed up to participate, can drop off their compostable kitchen waste.  The huts are not for garden waste.

Each compost hut can manage the compostable waste of between 40-60 households.

Inner West Council will manage the compost & turn it once or twice a week.  When ready, the composted material will be available for use by council in local parks or by residents.

I love this initiative.  It’s simple, cheap & totally sustainable.  To have food waste go back into producing lovely rich fertile soil to be used locally is perfect.  I really hope the trial works & compost huts will become the norm for use of residents all over the municipality.  Well done Council.

A rain garden is being created just behind the picnic table.

Murdoch Park at 171 Illawarra Road Marrickville is undergoing Stage Two of an upgrade.

Stage One was completed in June 2014.  The then Marrickville Council spent $50,000 to add a path, a new gate, a picnic table, a park bench, a drinking fountain & two sandstone sculptures.   They also planted a garden, vines along the fence & four trees.  The trees were a special treat because this green space had no trees & was just a patch of grass with a diagonal path from front to the back lane.  See –  http://bit.ly/2qvwUdj

Stage two includes a raingarden, which was being created when I went past recently.  I think Inner West Council has done well to make this small green space attractive & useable for people & a source of food & habitat for wildlife.

Green space is scarce in the former Marrickville municipality, so Council ensuring that each & every space is attractive strongly benefits the community.

The chimney December 2016 before any height was removed

Work has almost finished and scaffolding is gradually being removed. The two rings below the top of the chimney can be seen in the middle of the two platforms in the scaffolding in the photo showing the chimney before any bricks were removed. If I am correct, a lot of height was removed.

Back in December 2016 I posted about Sydney Water’s plan to reduce the height of the historic sewer vent at Premier Street Marrickville South.  See –  http://bit.ly/2pXqZ5f

In that post I wrote, “From memory Sydney Water did not feel confident that the vent would survive a one in 100 year storm.”    I was incorrect.  Sydney Water did not feel the chimney would survive a one in 500-year earthquake.  That is a far more interesting reason to remove part of an important historic landmark.  Problem is, none of us will be around to check whether this was indeed necessary at all.

If I look for it, this landmark is quite visible in my day to day activities.  So, it was with great interest that I watched what appeared to be nothing happening behind the scaffolding & I had a ridiculous hope that Sydney Water had changed their mind.

Over the months I chatted with quite a few locals about the chimney & realized I was just one of many who were observing the lack of progress with the hope that it was to be left intact.  Most days I would look & feel excited that the chimney was still untouched.

It was fun while it lasted as I was again wrong.  They did indeed start removing bricks & now their work appears to be completed.

As per the notice out front of the property, the chimney has been lowered to 17.85-metres.  I’ve read the historic detail page by Sydney Water ( http://bit.ly/2hh2LuS), but I cannot find the original height of the chimney to know how exactly much height has been removed.

However, I did notice a couple of interesting points –

  • The sewer vent maintains its original function as part of the SWSOOS ventilation system. So, the lower the chimney gets, the closer the community are to the smell of sewerage.
  • In 2000 the cowl was removed from the top of the chimney. I had to google to find out what a cowl is, so for those like me, “a cowl is a usually hood-shaped covering used to increase the draft of a chimney and prevent backflow.”

The finished work doesn’t look too bad in that there is still something to see on the hill & this landmark is still visible from Petersham.  We haven’t lost out completely.   It’s a shame it has happened at all, but hopefully, if an earthquake does happen, everyone will be safe.

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