You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘tree removal’ tag.

The Coral tree for removal is centre of this photo.

Inner West Council has given notice that they intend to remove a Coral tree (Erythrina × sykesii ) inside Weekley Park, adjacent to 89 Albany Road Stanmore.

Council gives the following reasons for removal –

  • “Tree has poor vitality and significant canopy dieback.
  • Major open wound to trunk with decay and loss of structural wood.
  • The tree poses an unacceptable level of risk to the public and property.”

The Coral tree is thought to be a “hybrid of horticultural origin, that was probably developed in Australia or New Zealand.” http://bit.ly/2tsjgKC

It is regarded as a weed tree in NSW because they can regrow from a fallen branch, a twig or stem or even suckers.  Despite this, they can easily be managed in suburban areas as shown by Bayside Council who have classified a number of their old Coral trees as significant & protected.

The condition of this Coral tree in Weekley Park is as described by Council.   They say they will replace this tree with an Illawarra flame tree (Brachychiton acerifolius) by September 2017.

While it is a shame to lose this big old Coral tree, I am pleased that it will be replaced with a native tree that puts on a great colour show & can grow to a significant size.  We need big trees.

Illawarra flame trees are native to coastal rainforests from central New South Wales to far north Queensland.  They are deciduous in winter & produce clusters of vivid red bell-shaped flowers over spring-summer, which provide food for nectar-eating birds, bees & butterflies.  Anytime an Illawarra Flame tree is added to the Inner West landscape is a win as far as I am concerned.

The deadline for submissions is this Friday 23rd June 2017.

It appears that the bark was removed to inspect the tree. You can see that it is not in great shape.

Marrickville Golf Course

Inner West Council has given notice that they intend to remove & work on trees located in Marrickville Golf Course.

Council says it plans to do the following –

  • “Tree removal– includes the removal of several dead trees or trees present significant defects and/or structural issues.
  • The creation of habitat trees– where trees are reduced down to safe limbs and boxes and hollows are created for use by native fauna.
  • Tree pruning– to remove defective or dead branches to reduce risk.”

Council do not give the location or number of trees to be removed.  We should be told about each individual tree & why they must be removed.

Nor do they give the number & location of trees they intend to prune or those they intend to make into Habitat Trees.    Council goes on to say that –

“All trees to be removed will be replaced (and more) as part of a planting program to be developed in collaboration with Council, Marrickville Golf Course and the community.”

Again, Council does not tell the community how many new trees will be planted or what species.

This is not something I understand.  I think it is in Council’s interest to tell the community how many trees they will plant because this is positive information that makes people who care about the local environment happy.  If Council had informed the community that they planned to plant 15 new native trees for example, everyone would feel happy about it, which is good for Council.

It is called transparency.  It is their duty.  Open & full communication is the only thing that instills trust in the community for what its government does.   You can’t have words about believing in open government & consultation, but fail to inform your community.

On a positive note, I think it is wonderful that more habitat trees are being created, especially in this important biodiversity corridor along the Cooks River.   I also think it is great that more trees will be planted.  The golf course has plenty of room for more trees.

A section of the site of  what will be the St Peters Interchange for WestConnex Motorway

Signs from the community are everywhere and everywhere a sign is designates a tree that will be chopped down for the Motorway.

We had a look at Campbell & Euston Roads around Sydney Park yesterday.  Even though I expected this having seen the beginning of the demolition, actually looking at the carnage was difficult.  I cannot believe the size of the spaghetti junction (officially known as the St Peters Interchange).  It is mammoth.

I found it sad to look at mounds of earth where once were people’s homes & where a significant band of very tall trees once stood.

I am really interested to see if the artist’s impression of the green & leafy St Peters Interchange will actually look like it is depicted 10-years post completion.  In the image trees soar above the elevated roadway.  It looks almost utopian.

The Sydney Park side of Campbell Street has yet to undergo tree clearing.  To see all those beautiful mature trees that will be chopped down & mulched is sobering.  I hope we do not end up with yet another main road devoid of street trees.

The Euston Road side of Sydney Park is a mass of dirt.  What was once thick trees in the park is now waiting to become bitumen.  I don’t know whether this was true for all hours of the day, but whenever I have gone there, this road has always been sleepy.  Yes, there was traffic, but not much of it.  That will change once it becomes part of the motorway, but I do wonder where the traffic will go once it gets here.

While we were looking through the cyclone fencing at the old Dial a Dump site, a security man drove up & parked a couple of metres from where we were standing & watched us.  I found this action surprising as we were on a public road outside a gate in broad daylight, dressed in normal clothes, making no movement to enter the property & carrying nothing more than a camera.  He was parked further down Campbell Street, but chose to come real close.  It was somewhat threatening.

Lastly, the Stop WestConnex community must be feeling vindicated when the news this week released that the $16.8 billion price tag for WestConnex motorway is projected to blossom to almost $29 billion more than expected, at least this is what analysis by the City of Sydney Council suggests.

“The analysis, which is disputed by the state government, argues WestConnex and its connecting roads combined will cost more than $45 billion, after the extra roads are added to the project’s $16.8 billion public price tag.”

Lord Mayor of Sydney Clover Moore said, “Just one exit from WestConnex in St Peters, for example, will require more than $1 billion of publicly funded road upgrades to manage the extra 30,000 cars that will pour into the area daily.”  See- http://bit.ly/2of6rjw   

Every entrance & exit from WestConnex will require road work.

A section of the tree removal in Sydney Park for WestConnex

Another section of WestConnex tree removal in Sydney Park

These trees have yet to be chopped down.

Here is the red flowering gum in 2016 – short, but bulky.

Here is the same tree in February 2017 after being vandalised.  A dead Brushbox is on the right.

A close up of the vandalised tree. You can see that branches have been twisted and ripped off.

Around 5-6 years ago, Marrickville Council planted some red flowering gums along the verge on Livingstone Road near & in front of Marrickville Park.  At the time, I was very surprised as I think Council rarely plants flowering gums. Imagine if the streets were full of flowering gums instead of those awful weed trees Evergreen ash (Fraxinus griffithii), with their hundreds of thousands of seeds per tree.  Flowering gums come in orange, hot pink, soft pink & red flowers & are food producing for nectar-eating wildlife.  They are a short stature tree & perfect for under powerlines.

Unfortunately, Council was ripped off as these trees were the ones that only grow to 1 – 1.5 metres & over a very long time.  I do remember there was talk about removing them in one council meeting, but that did not go any further.

Every year these trees would burst into flower & look terrific.  Every time I passed I looked for them to assess their growth.

Last year Council planted six Queensland Brushbox trees outside the tennis courts on Livingstone Road in-between the flowering gums.  I thought this was wonderful. Brushbox trees grow tall, look lovely & have a great canopy.  This is the side of the road without powerlines so they could grow & eventually could create a visual link to the mature Brushbox trees in Marrickvile Park.

Unfortunately, only three of the newly planted Brushbox trees survived.  It may have been the extraordinary heat over the summer.  Who knows.

A few weeks ago I saw that the biggest red flowering gum, a quite substantial shrub really, had been vandalised.  Someone had twisted & ripped off all but one branch. It must have taken them a great deal of strength & energy to do this because the branches were quite thick.   Yet another public tree lost to an antisocial vandal who is against the public interest.

If I feel frustrated at the amount of tree vandalism that happens in the former Marrickville municipality, I think Council must be either pulling their hair out or numb with fatigue witnessing the destructive things the happen in public spaces.

There are some in our community who go out of their way to destroy any beauty in public spaces.  They would not pick up rubbish or pull weeds out from the verge or footpath as “this is council’s job,” but they think they have a right to vandalise or destroy a street tree because it is in front of their house or planted in a place they think a tree should not be. I have heard people express this sentiment a lot & I’ve never understood the contradictory personal ideology that creates it.

I scoffed when I read today, the following statement in a 2015 article in The Conversation about tree vandalism (http://bit.ly/2n5Ixq7)Larger councils with 50-100,000 trees have somewhere between five and 10 trees killed each year.”

At last count in 2012 the former Marrickville municipality had 22,608 street trees & I doubt this number has changed much.  I can say with complete confidence that at least 10 street trees are vandalised & killed each year just in the suburb of Marrickville, not the whole former Marrickville Council municipality.

Everyone must have read the Chinese proverb –  “The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago.  The second best time is now.”   

It takes at least a decade for most newly planted trees to start providing any real benefits in terms of shade, carbon sequestration, pollution uptake & oxygen output.  The twenty years is needed to allow the tree time to grow into a decent size.

Anyway, Council has removed the three dead trees & the vandalised gum.  When looking at my photos tonight I realised that I had a photo of another flowering gum in this particular block & that too has been removed.  Maybe it was also vandalised.  So that is five dead or vandalised trees in what is the space of 40-metres.  Not bad hey?

I wrote a long list of reasons why I thought people vandalised trees here – http://bit.ly/2mCPnY8

Showing 5 of the 6 newly planted Brushbox trees and TWO red flowering gums. It was only after looking at these photos did I see that there was another red flowering gum alive and well here and this too has been removed. Maybe this one was vandalised as well.  The second gum is behind the second staked tree on the right. 

Showing the tree death in this location. Three Brushbox in a row died and one red flowering gum was vandalised. One other small gum tree has also been removed bringing the death count to five.

 

The crack is significant.

The crack is significant.  

Inner West Council has given notice that they intend to remove a Narrow-leafed red ironbark (Eucalyptus crebra) opposite 6 Tramway Avenue Tempe.

Tramway is a lovely street with lots of street trees.  The tree to be removed is the one with the sign.  I am glad that Council are replacing with another in this location.

Tramway is a lovely street with lots of street trees. The tree to be removed is the one with the sign. I am glad that Council are replacing with another in this location.

Council gives the following reasons for removal –

  • “Tree has significant crack in the main trunk causing it to be structurally unsound.
  • The tree poses an unacceptable level of risk to the public and property.”

Council says they will replace with a Red Iron Bark (Eucalyptus sideroxylon) as part of the 2017 Street Tree Planting Program between May & September.

The deadline for submissions is Friday 3rd March 2017. 

This is a big tree - one of hundreds of big trees that will be removed to widen Campbell Street & Euston Road for the WestConnex Motorway

This is a very big tree – one of hundreds of big trees that will be removed to widen Campbell Street & Euston Road for the WestConnex Motorway

The trees in Euston Road are big, much bigger than the street trees we are used to seeing in the old Marrickville municipality

The trees in Euston Road are big, much bigger than the street trees we are used to seeing in what until recently, was Marrickville municipality.  Stand here and all you can here is birdsong, especially Fig birds.

Every tree you see is to be removed. Just past the grass is the lower pond filled with water birds. It appears that the land taken by WestConnex will come very close to this pond.

Every tree you see is to be removed. Just past the grass is the lower pond filled with water birds. It appears that the land taken by WestConnex will come very close to this pond.

We have just returned from the ‘Save Sydney Park Festival’ organised by the WestConnex Action Group & Reclaim the Streets.   We also visited the Camp of residents who have stayed in the park for the past 13 days.   It has not been without drama though.  At 3am on 20th September, police evicted the camp & the WestConnex Authority came & fenced off the campsite.  The Camp moved further up the park & re-pitched their tents.  Today a lone security guard sat in the fenced off area protecting the trees from the community for the WestConnex Authority.  Taxpayers’ dollars at work. It’s the community which wants to save the trees.

The Camp of the WestConnex Action Group & supporters

The Camp of the WestConnex Action Group & supporters

The WestConnex Authority is preparing to chop down hundreds of trees along Campbell Street & Euston Road St Peters.  If this wasn’t bad enough, they also intend to encroach 12-metres into Sydney Park itself & remove many mature trees, shrubs & gardens.

The WestConnex Action Group ( http://www.westconnexactiongroup.org.au ) says that, “The State Government is cutting down more than 350 trees & taking 14,000 square metres of Sydney Park to build their dirty toll road.”

The WestConnex Action Group has spent a significant number of people hours tying blue fabric around each tree to be removed.  There is blue everywhere you look.  Hundreds of decades old trees will be felled.  Even worse is the blue fabric around massive trees inside Sydney Park.  It is also reasonable to think that any tree within 10-metres of the work zone would also be at risk of dying if their roots extend into the work zone, so perhaps more precious trees will be casualties of this motorway.

Sydney Park may seem like a big park, but we don;t have much green space in the area & to lose any is terrible. Sydney Park is only across the road from the boundary of the old Marrickville Municipality.  The old Marrickville municipality has the least green space in Australia.  Therefore, Sydney Park is used a lot by this community, plus the community of the City of Sydney municipality & the numerous visitors who travel significant distance to spend time in the park.  No wonder. It is a beautiful park that just keeps on improving every year.

So for the WestConnex Authority to take a whopping 14,000 square metres of Sydney Park in an area with very little green space is a huge loss.

Campbell Street & Euston Road St Peters will be widened into 6 lanes taking traffic from the St Peters Interchange (colloquially known as the Spaghetti Junction) to Alexandria, Mascot & Newtown then into surrounding roads originally built for horses with carts.  The traffic bottle necks are going to be very frustrating to drivers & for the local community who are going to be hit with far more traffic than they have ever experienced, plus associated air pollution & health issues from the pollution.

The St Peters Interchange itself is massive & one wonders why it needs to be so large.  Looking at the plans it looks to be three-quarters the size of Sydney Park.

An article published three days ago in the Telegraph, (which I am unable to access again to give you the link) said that 85,000 square metres of new parkland will be created under & around the St Peters Interchange.  The new parkland will come with two ventilation stacks.   The first public space is due to be opened in 2019 & the second in 2023.

Now I don’t know about you, but we will be very unlikely to choose to spend our time outdoors under a freeway spaghetti junction with particulate matter dropping down on us from the vehicles traveling above & pollution from the two ventilation stacks.   It won’t matter how green the grass is.

It seems that the WestConnex Authority has carte blanche to seize public green space for this motorway.  Just a couple of weeks ago they levelled 1.4 hectares of critically endangered REMNANT Cooks River Castlereagh Ironbark forest in Wolli Creek for a TEMPORARY car park.  Unbelievable!   See – http://bit.ly/2cpNw1i   This action is a big fat “we just don’t care about the environment” by the WestConnex Authority, aka the NSW government.

The WestConnex Authority tried it on for historic Ashfield Park wanting to destroy heritage trees & take away community green space, again for a car park.  See – http://bit.ly/2dkCivB   Thankfully the community won & Ashfield Park was saved.  Hopefully Sydney Park can also be saved.

My question to the NSW Government is – why do you choose to rob the Inner West community of green space?  Why not purchase the industrial buildings across the road from Sydney Park to provide the space needed to widen the road?  They certainly did not hesitate to force people out of their homes, so why not the same equity for industrial properties?   Or why not build better public transport?

We looked around, spoke to numerous people & heard the anger, dismay & the concern for the park, the trees & the wildlife.  Then we cycled around for a good look at what is proposed to be lost to road.  Of concern is the wildlife – the Bell frogs, the Tawny frogmouths & number other birds & all the other creatures that live in the trees to be removed.  The area subsumed comes mighty close to the bottom pond, which is also of concern.  Hopefully my photos will show what is to be lost more effectively than my words.

Everywhere I looked I saw big trees and blue ribbons indicating that these trees were to be chopped down.

Everywhere I looked I saw big trees and blue ribbons indicating that these trees were to be chopped down.  All the trees in the centre of the photograph are also in the area to be claimed by the WestConnex Authority.

The signs say it clearly

The signs say it clearly.   We cannot forget about the wildlife.

Some of the signs in the Camp.

Some of the signs in the Camp.

More signs

More signs

A sign in Campbell Street eloquently expresses community anger

A sign in Campbell Street eloquently expresses community anger

Local graffiti directing people to

Local graffiti is another visible sign of community anger.

The Town and Country Hotel at St Peter's -immortalised in the Duncan song by Slim Dusty is a casualty of WestConnex.

The Town and Country Hotel at St Peter’s -immortalised in the Duncan song by Slim Dusty & also a casualty of WestConnex.    PS.  In the Sun-Herald today, 2nd October 2016, there is an article titled, ‘Legal row leaves pub with no beer.’  In a nutshell, the Town and Country Hotel “fought off the threat from an extension to WestConnex….”  So I was wrong.  This iconic pub survives.

 

 

 

 

 

 

All that is left is three orange safety cones.

All that is left is three orange safety cones.

From my memory three Lombardy poplar trees were planted at the front of the Revolution apartments on Illawarra Road Marrickville around 2 – 2.5 years ago, shortly after the development was completed.  The trees were growing well.  This species is fast growing, so they were noticeable on the streetscape.

Sometime in the last week all three trees were removed & replaced by orange safety cones.  I have read reports that men with a truck removed the trees, so the trees were not removed by an opportunistic vandal.

Who knows why the trees were removed or even who removed them?  There is no Notification of Removal on Inner West Councils website.   Makes me sigh.

Inner West Council have given notification that they have removed a Small-Leaved Peppermint (Eucalyptus nicholii ) outside 73 Station Street Petersham.

Council gave the following reasons for removal –

  • “Tree was in poor condition with structural root instability.
  • Active termites & advanced internal decay at base.
  • The tree posed an unacceptable level of risk to the public & property.”

They say they will replace this tree with a Spotted Gum (Corymbia maculata) in the 2017 Street Tree Planting Program.

This area is to be planted with a 1.5-2 metre salt marsh next to the river.

This area directly next to the river is to be planted with a 1.5-2 metre wide salt marsh.

A couple enjoys the shade next to the river.

A couple enjoys the shade next to the river.

Continuing on from my posts for Mahoney Reserve – http://bit.ly/210uG1I, Steel Park – http://bit.ly/1suDxOh & Richardson’s Lookout, Warren Park & Cooks River Foreshore – http://wp.me/pyn6B-2mv

Inner West Council plans the following upgrades for Mackey Park –

  • Install 15 new seats.
  • Install 4 picnic tables along the river frontage
  • Install 2 new barbeques at river frontage.
  • Install bike racks
  • Install exercise equipment.
  • Install a new shade structure adjacent to the playground.
  • Install barbecue facilities in the playground.
  • Provide additional seating in the playground.
  • Install new playground equipment.
  • Repaint the River Canoe Club with a mural.
  • Plant a 1.5-2 metre salt marsh riparian along the edge of the river. While I think it is great to re-vegetate the river, I wonder why Council wants to stop people from accessing the river’s edge. Will the concrete stormwater top be the only place where we can sit directly at the river’s edge?
  • Remove the fencing from around the wetland and expand the area of vegetation
  • Remove exotic vegetation at the Concordia Club & plant low growing local, native plants.
  • The car park in the Concordia Club will include planting, rain gardens & regulated parking.

I went to Mackey Park the day after I posted about the intended removal of the poplar trees & saw that all the Poplars along the shared pathway at Mackey Park had a small silver number tag attached to the trunk.  These tags were not attached to the trees the previous week.

Obviously these trees are being allowed to stay.  Although I am very happy about this, I would think that they too would be “damaging water quality and adjacent plant communities,” which is the reason for removing 27 poplars in Council’s report.  Again, I say that I find it amazing that Council would spend so much money to remove trees for such odd reasons in this time of climate change. I have written about the decision to remove 27 trees here – http://wp.me/pyn6B-2lm

Community consultation is open until tomorrow Wednesday 8th June 2016.  You can access the link at ‘Your Say Marrickville’ & download the Plan here – http://bit.ly/1DRISiO

Showing the new tags attached to all the poplar trees along the shared pathway in Mackey Park

Showing the new tags attached to all the poplar trees along the shared pathway in Mackey Park

The shrubs around the Concordia Club seen on the left will be removed.

The shrubs around the Concordia Club seen on the left will be removed.

Warren Park Marrickville

Warren Park Marrickville

Plan for Cooks River parklands  – Richardson’s Lookout, Warren Park & Cooks River Foreshore

This is a series of posts about Inner West Council’s plan (nee Marrickville Council) for all the parks along the Cooks River, except Tempe Reserve.

For Mahoney Reserve. See – http://bit.ly/210uG1I For Steel Park – http://bit.ly/1suDxOh

I have not covered all of what Council intends, just those areas that are environmental initiatives or those that interest me.  The link to download the Plan is below.

Richardson’s Lookout

Inner West Council plans the following upgrades for Richardson’s Lookout –

  • Mulch & plant natives under the heritage fig trees.
  • Create an equal access path from Thornley Street to Richardson’s Lookout.
  • Revegetate the unusable area surrounding the Cooks pine.
  • Install 3 new seats.

Warren Park

The following is planned for Warren Park –

  • Build a native vegetated swale to the existing low point at the eastern end of Warren Park.
  • Do bank stabilisation works & “ant-scour” on steeper slopes. I do not know what ant-scour means.
  • Build a vegetated detention basin prior to the Cooks River.
  • The fencing between Warren Park & Thornley Street will be removed & native grasses & other local native plantings planted to act as a barrier between the park & the road.
  • Install 2 new seats.

Cooks river foreshore

The following is planned for the Cooks River Foreshore –

  • A failing retaining wall will be replaced with stone or similar. Biodiversity opportunities will be incorporated into wall design.
  • More re-vegetation will be done along the river foreshore.
  • Build a river-viewing pontoon or jetty constructed from steel mesh or similar.
  • Install an exercise station.
  • Install 3 new seats.
  • Install bike racks.
  • Install night lighting along the share pathway.
  • Progressively remove the Poplar Trees between Mackey Park & Warren Park. A total of 27 trees will be removed along the river from Mackey Park to Mahoney Reserve.  I have been waiting for this to happen for years, as a then Tree Manager told me it was planned when I spoke with him at the opening of Mackey Park in December 2010.  If the community doesn’t fight to keep these trees we will lose them. I have written about my horror about the proposed tree removal here. See – http://wp.me/pyn6B-2lm

Community consultation is open until tomorrow Wednesday 8th June 2016.  You can access the link at ‘Your Say Marrickville’ & download the Plan here – http://bit.ly/1DRISiO

All the Poplar trees along this beautiful walk are to be removed along the Cooks River Foreshore.

All the Poplar trees along this beautiful walk along the Cooks River Foreshore are to be removed 

 Richardsons Reserve and the Cooks Pine.

Richardsons Reserve and the Cooks Pine.

click here to follow Saving Our Trees on Twitter

Archives

Categories

© Copyright

Using and copying text and photographs is not permitted without my permission.

Blog Stats

  • 501,787 hits
%d bloggers like this: